Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStardust
IN THE NEWS

Stardust

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been corrected. See below for details. Though unassuming, the kitchen clock onstage near Willie Nelson's amplifier at the Hollywood Bowl was the perfect prop. The Texas singer on Friday night delivered the entirety of his 1978 album of classic ballads, "Stardust," and the second hand circled, chronicling the moments while elegantly crafted lines and melodies, as pure as a perfect haiku, drifted into the crowd. "Funny how time slips away," he observed in his self-penned classic of the same name.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Angels in Stardust" is a creaky coming-of-age fantasy-drama whose luminous lead actress, A.J. Michalka ("Grace Unplugged"), has hopefully seen the last of this kind of ungainly corn pone. Writer-director William Robert Carey may channel bits from such classics as "The Purple Rose of Cairo" and "The Last Picture Show" to tell this Dust Bowl tale of teen dreams, trailer trash, cowboys and, yes, Indians (or as the film's hugely retrograde approach to Native Americans would have it, "Injuns")
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Angels in Stardust" is a creaky coming-of-age fantasy-drama whose luminous lead actress, A.J. Michalka ("Grace Unplugged"), has hopefully seen the last of this kind of ungainly corn pone. Writer-director William Robert Carey may channel bits from such classics as "The Purple Rose of Cairo" and "The Last Picture Show" to tell this Dust Bowl tale of teen dreams, trailer trash, cowboys and, yes, Indians (or as the film's hugely retrograde approach to Native Americans would have it, "Injuns")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
The most startling - and stunning - moment in David Roussève's latest dance-theater hybrid, "Stardust," came an hour into the 80-minute intermissionless piece, which premiered Tuesday at REDCAT. The 53-year-old choreographer appeared, seemingly out of nowhere, to perform a heartwrenching solo set to Johnny Mathis crooning the Bach/Gounod “Ave Maria.” With his jerking, swooping arms and quasi-angelic face, Roussève, bathed in Christopher Kuhl's amber light, and bending and dipping as if the world's weight were on his shoulders, was spellbinding.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Willie Nelson didn't get labeled an outlaw for nothing. Having turned his back on the Nashville-based country music establishment that tried to reign him in as a performer in the 1960s, Nelson hit his stride in the 1970s with a series of singles and albums made pretty much exactly the way he wanted them made. But that was hardly the end of the story for his idiosyncratic ways. After scoring his first No. 1 country hit as a performer in 1975 with "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain" and returning to the top spot on the country chart that year in tandem with Waylon Jennings with "Good Hearted Woman," Nelson helped usher in a new era of maverick country music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Susan Josephs
As a child growing up in Houston, David Roussève spent most of his Sundays attending an African American Roman Catholic church. Though determined to be a model altar boy, he questioned the definition of sin. "I certainly wasn't in touch then with my own sexuality," says the now 53-year-old choreographer, who came out as a gay man in his mid-20s to his family. "But I knew for a fact there were people in that congregation who were having sex and who weren't married, and it didn't seem right that all these people were going to hell.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
It's not exactly young love, but some might find it romantic. On Valentine's Day, an aging Lothario that has been flitting from beauty to beauty through the solar system will make his final stop, taking pictures of a battered dowager to send to the folks back home before disappearing forever. The Stardust spacecraft, which has already taken images of asteroid Annefrank and captured interstellar dust from comet Wild 2, on Monday night will swing by comet Tempel 1. There, it will take new pictures of the devastation wrought on the comet by NASA's 2005 Deep Impact mission.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2011 | Diane K. Fisher
Comet Tempel 1 has received more attention than any other comet in the universe -- at least as far as we know! Comets are part of our solar system, but we don't see them very often. Lots of comets hang out (with Pluto) beyond the orbit of Neptune. This region is called the Kuiper (KY-per) Belt. Many more comets (maybe a trillion!) live much, much farther away in another region of the solar system called the Oort Cloud. Comets seem to be mostly ice with rocks and dirt mixed in. As a comet approaches the Sun, it gets warmed up and some of the ice boils off, taking some of the dust with it. This material forms a cloud -- a coma -- around the comet nucleus.
MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991
I was ready to pass right over yet another article on the annoying baby boom generation. Then I noticed that, having been born in 1963, I was included among this pathetic mob. Boomers were born into the richest country ever when it was at the pinnacle of its power, and what does the next generation get? Dan Quayle, a neutered Democratic Party and an endless stream of annoying television and classic rock revivals. I am not stardust or golden and, quite frankly, I'm sick of hearing about the garden.
NEWS
May 2, 1993
I was very interested reading "For This Guy, Club Hopping's a Job" (L.A. Stories, April 20) about (Los Angeles Fire Department) inspector Alan Higginbotham and what he does to keep people safe. I am Irish. Reading the article brought very vivid and sad memories of an incident that occurred in Dublin on Feb. 13, 1981, when approximately 48 young people lost their lives and others were badly scarred in a fire at the Stardust nightclub. The main reason these people died was that the majority of the fire exits were locked with chains for fear of trespassers entering the club.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Susan Josephs
As a child growing up in Houston, David Roussève spent most of his Sundays attending an African American Roman Catholic church. Though determined to be a model altar boy, he questioned the definition of sin. "I certainly wasn't in touch then with my own sexuality," says the now 53-year-old choreographer, who came out as a gay man in his mid-20s to his family. "But I knew for a fact there were people in that congregation who were having sex and who weren't married, and it didn't seem right that all these people were going to hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been corrected. See below for details. Though unassuming, the kitchen clock onstage near Willie Nelson's amplifier at the Hollywood Bowl was the perfect prop. The Texas singer on Friday night delivered the entirety of his 1978 album of classic ballads, "Stardust," and the second hand circled, chronicling the moments while elegantly crafted lines and melodies, as pure as a perfect haiku, drifted into the crowd. "Funny how time slips away," he observed in his self-penned classic of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Willie Nelson didn't get labeled an outlaw for nothing. Having turned his back on the Nashville-based country music establishment that tried to reign him in as a performer in the 1960s, Nelson hit his stride in the 1970s with a series of singles and albums made pretty much exactly the way he wanted them made. But that was hardly the end of the story for his idiosyncratic ways. After scoring his first No. 1 country hit as a performer in 1975 with "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain" and returning to the top spot on the country chart that year in tandem with Waylon Jennings with "Good Hearted Woman," Nelson helped usher in a new era of maverick country music.
FOOD
June 2, 2011 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Is there a more stunning hotel lobby than the one at the iconic Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel? With its heavy painted beams, chic leather daybeds and grand proportions, it exudes old Hollywood glamour. A stately hush hovers over the vast room, and most of the time it's quiet enough to talk, a perfect place to meet for a drink after a film at the American Cinematheque. From the Library Bar tucked in one corner you can order up a classy Manhattan made with rye, Carpano Antica vermouth and maraschino cherry liqueur.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2011 | Diane K. Fisher
Comet Tempel 1 has received more attention than any other comet in the universe -- at least as far as we know! Comets are part of our solar system, but we don't see them very often. Lots of comets hang out (with Pluto) beyond the orbit of Neptune. This region is called the Kuiper (KY-per) Belt. Many more comets (maybe a trillion!) live much, much farther away in another region of the solar system called the Oort Cloud. Comets seem to be mostly ice with rocks and dirt mixed in. As a comet approaches the Sun, it gets warmed up and some of the ice boils off, taking some of the dust with it. This material forms a cloud -- a coma -- around the comet nucleus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Orrin Tucker, a bandleader whose orchestra achieved national prominence with a 1939 recording of "Oh Johnny, Oh Johnny, Oh!" and who decades later owned a big-band venue on Sunset Boulevard, has died. He was 100. Tucker, who was a longtime resident of South Pasadena, died April 9 in the San Gabriel Valley, said his daughter, Nora Compere. After forming the band in 1933, Tucker was its primary vocalist until jazz trumpeter Louis Armstrong suggested that a petite singer named Evelyn Nelson would be a good fit for the group, according to biographical references.
OPINION
October 29, 2006 | Swati Pandey, SWATI PANDEY is a researcher for the editorial pages.
LESS THAN two years from its 50th birthday, the Stardust Resort and Casino is closing Wednesday, the latest nail in the coffin of the old Las Vegas of jeweled-and-feathered glamour girls, boyish crooners and mob heavies. In its place will be the Boyd Gaming Corp.'s 5,300-room Echelon Place. The Stardust signaled its arrival at noon July 2, 1958, by exploding several bombs. It was the largest resort in the world, boasting 1,065 rooms and the largest swimming pool in Nevada.
SCIENCE
February 15, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Images of comet Tempel 1 taken by the Stardust spacecraft during its Monday night close encounter suggest that the comet's surface is much more fragile than astronomers had anticipated, with major changes occurring during its 5 1/2-year orbit of the sun, researchers said Tuesday. The close-up pictures also showed an unexpected layering of the comet's interior, a feature that researchers had not been able to detect in 2005 when an earlier mission shot an 820-pound probe into Tempel 1's side.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|