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SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Up and down the West Coast, starfish are dying. Casualties of a mysterious disease known as seastar wasting syndrome, they are dying in Alaska, deteriorating in San Diego and disappearing from long stretches  in between. Death from the disease is quick and icky. It begins with a small lesion on a starfish's body that rapidly develops into an infection the animal cannot fight. Over the course of the disease the starfish's legs might drop off, or even separate from the body and start to crawl away, as you can see in the PBS news story below.
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SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Up and down the West Coast, starfish are dying. Casualties of a mysterious disease known as seastar wasting syndrome, they are dying in Alaska, deteriorating in San Diego and disappearing from long stretches  in between. Death from the disease is quick and icky. It begins with a small lesion on a starfish's body that rapidly develops into an infection the animal cannot fight. Over the course of the disease the starfish's legs might drop off, or even separate from the body and start to crawl away, as you can see in the PBS news story below.
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SCIENCE
November 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Starfish up and down the West Coast are suffering from a strange disease known as "seastar wasting syndrome," and scientists are unsure why it is happening. Pockets of starfish decimation have been found from Southern California to Alaska. In some places the entire seastar population has been wiped out. (And before you get confused, seastar and starfish are two names for the same animal and I'll be using them interchangably.) PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish The seastar wasting disease begins as a small sore somewhere along the seastar's body.
SCIENCE
November 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Starfish up and down the West Coast are suffering from a strange disease known as "seastar wasting syndrome," and scientists are unsure why it is happening. Pockets of starfish decimation have been found from Southern California to Alaska. In some places the entire seastar population has been wiped out. (And before you get confused, seastar and starfish are two names for the same animal and I'll be using them interchangably.) PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish The seastar wasting disease begins as a small sore somewhere along the seastar's body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992
I think people should stop catching starfish because starfish make the sea look more beautiful. When people catch them, they don't know what to do with them, so the starfish dies and rots and makes the air stinky. JOHN KIM Oxnard Editor's note: These Letters to the Editor come from E.L.M. Street School in Oxnard. E.L.M.--Educational Learning Magnet Intersession--is a new school in the Oxnard School District that offers 10-day sessions for students who are between terms in the all-year school system.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers pushing the limits of optical design are learning from a simple sea creature crusted with tiny lenses, each one smaller and more perfect than any human engineer could devise. The brittlestar, as the organism is called, sees with its bones.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ANDREW BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I came here to find a starfish, that craggy, rough-to-the-touch emblem of the lure of the deep and the childlike wonder of distant seas. Instead, I found Martha and a pair of poodles in matching camouflage fatigues. My first question was not, why on Earth would a couple of poodles require camouflage gear, but why would they wear jungle green instead of the more appropriate sand color popularized in Desert Storm? "The poodles like wearing them," Martha explained. Surely, this is a beach in need of a DMZ--a line of demarcation to separate its elements: tide-pool investigators and cave dwellers, Boogie-boarding Valhalla dropouts and G-stringed sunbathers.
SCIENCE
October 2, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
The coral in Australia's Great Barrier Reef is rapidly disappearing due to a host of factors -- all of which are influenced by humans, according to a new study. The report, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, tracks coral cover over the last 27 years and finds levels have fallen by nearly 50%. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the world's most beloved natural attractions because of its remarkable array of sea life. But, according to researchers, a trio of factors has conspired to degrade the reef: tropical cyclones, attacks from the coral predator the crown-of-thorns starfish, and rising water temperatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1988 | CARY DARLING
*** THE CHURCH. "Starfish." Arista. The pairing of Australia's opaque, moody Church with the straight-ahead American production team of Greg Ladanyi and Waddy Wachtel seems like a desperate attempt by the band to get a hit after years of struggling. Yet, surprisingly, there's no sense of compromise of "Starfish." The dense, shimmering, exquisite guitar pop that has built the quartet a sturdy cult following is here in all its neo-psychedelic glory.
TRAVEL
March 24, 1996
On Sundays, I paw my way through the voluminous Times for the Travel section first, restraining myself from immediately turning to the back to savor "My Best Shot" before reading at least one or two articles. I must also comment on the consistent quality, variety and humor of your contributors, most recently Phil Barber and "Lost in Sulawesi" (Feb. 25). One line begs to be preserved for posterity: "If starfish could fly, and if you flattened one while doing 65 mph in a Jeep Cherokee, the resulting splatter on your windshield might approximate the shape of Sulawesi."
SCIENCE
October 2, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
The coral in Australia's Great Barrier Reef is rapidly disappearing due to a host of factors -- all of which are influenced by humans, according to a new study. The report, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, tracks coral cover over the last 27 years and finds levels have fallen by nearly 50%. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the world's most beloved natural attractions because of its remarkable array of sea life. But, according to researchers, a trio of factors has conspired to degrade the reef: tropical cyclones, attacks from the coral predator the crown-of-thorns starfish, and rising water temperatures.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2009 | Bob Drogin
The first comprehensive effort to identify and catalog every species in the world's oceans, from microbes to blue whales, is a year from completion. But early discoveries have profoundly altered understanding of life beneath the sea, senior scientists say. New tracking tools, for example, show that some bluefin tuna migrate between Los Angeles and Yokohama, Japan; one tagged tuna crossed the Pacific three times in a year.
FOOD
July 9, 2008 | Vani Rangachar, Special to The Times
IN THE 15th century, Vasco da Gama and other Portuguese seamen left their Atlantic-facing nation to cash in on the spice trade. They established colonies in South America, India, Africa and beyond, and as they gathered up the riches of their explorations, they spread their culture and cuisine and returned with the ingredients to spice up their own.
TRAVEL
March 2, 2008 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
Legendary rocker Keith Richards was out of uniform. No dangling cigarette, no wailing guitar, no stormy look. As a matter of fact, he was grinning. And scratching the tummy of a shaggy black munchkin of a dog. It was late January, and the Rolling Stones icon was chilling on a wooden dock overlooking the turquoise waters surrounding Parrot Cay, a Caribbean islet that bills itself as "the world's most exclusive resort."
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers pushing the limits of optical design are learning from a simple sea creature crusted with tiny lenses, each one smaller and more perfect than any human engineer could devise. The brittlestar, as the organism is called, sees with its bones.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2000 | ROBERT HILBURN and RANDY LEWIS
Limp Bizkit--one of the acts frequently cited in the debate over pop music content thathas stretched from the nation's living rooms to Capitol Hill--appears to be stronger than ever. The irreverent rap-rock group's new album, "Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water," got off to such a blistering sales start Tuesday in its first day in stores that one major retailer projects the album will sell about 1.3 million copies this week.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | Reuters
Millions of Crown of Thorn starfish that threatened to destroy the Australian Great Barrier Reef are disappearing--and no one is quite sure why. "The whole thing is a damn mystery. We still don't know where they (the starfish) come from, where they go and why they die," a spokesman for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1993 | ROBERT ELSTON
It was difficult for Kenny Rakeshaw, a kindergarten student at Newport Heights Elementary School, to imagine that the shiny starfish he was making Monday would end up on the nation's Christmas tree in Washington. "It is going to somebody's house," Kenny guessed, while gripping his thin copper cutout, complete with five tentacles. The 620 students of Newport Heights on Monday made the ornaments to decorate the Christmas tree to stand on the grounds of Capitol Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1998 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sure, you can go to the beach in the summer, cool off in the surf, then kick back on the sun-baked sand. But a day at the beach in the dead of winter has its charm, too. You can go it alone, or join a number of scheduled beach outings and see some nifty coastal spots in and around Ventura County. And you'll glean some marine science along the way. For exploring tide pools, winter is ideal.
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