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May 21, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The captain of the American frigate that was attacked by an Iraqi aircraft in the Persian Gulf said Wednesday that defense systems aboard the ship were fully operational at the time of the raid but that there was not sufficient time to deploy them. In his first public comment since the Sunday attack that left 37 sailors dead, Capt. Glenn R.
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April 20, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court Monday dismissed a lawsuit filed against military contractors by families of 37 sailors who died on the guided-missile frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf in 1987, on the grounds that permitting the case to proceed could expose military secrets. The Stark was on patrol on May 17, 1987, during the Iran-Iraq war, when it was struck by two Exocet missiles fired by an Iraqi fighter jet.
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NEWS
June 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Last month's attack on the guided missile frigate Stark, which killed 37 sailors, might have been prevented by the use of a simple and inexpensive decoy device available since 1970, a published report said. The Chicago Tribune reported in Sunday's editions that while the Navy is spending tens of billions of dollars researching high-technology defenses against anti-ship missiles, it has failed to deploy the decoy device originally known as "Rubber Duckie."
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | Associated Press
A sailor convicted in two hammer slayings despite claims that he was driven insane by the 1987 Iraqi missile attack on the frigate Stark was sentenced Monday to two consecutive life terms. Walter Thomas Taylor Jr., 24, must serve 50 years before he is eligible for parole. Taylor was convicted Feb. 8 of two counts of first-degree murder in the Aug. 8, 1987, slayings of Paula Smits, 21, and her daughter, Amanda, 3.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON and OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writers
The death toll Monday rose to 28 aboard the U.S. Navy ship struck by an Iraqi missile, and President Reagan ordered other American vessels in the Persian Gulf to a higher state of alert, warning Iraq and Iran that their planes will be fired on if there is a hint of hostile intent. Twenty-four hours after the Stark, a guided missile frigate, was hit by an Iraqi air-to-sea missile streaking out of the darkness, firefighters still struggled to contain sporadic blazes on the ship.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Barely a month ago, U.S. Navy Capt. Glenn R. Brindel, 43, was the uniformly respected skipper of an award-winning ship, weeks away from completing his second successful command tour at sea. Then at 9:12 p.m. on May 17, Brindel's 22-year career was effectively shot down in the Persian Gulf when an Iraqi fighter pilot fired two Exocet missiles into his ship, the guided-missile frigate Stark. The attack killed 37 sailors and wounded 21 others.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
With parades, prayers and the playing of taps, Americans honored their war dead on a Memorial Day made freshly somber by the painful memory of the 37 sailors killed on the U.S. frigate Stark. About 5,000 veterans joined family and friends of dead servicemen at Arlington National Cemetery, where a ceremony honored the Stark crewmen killed on May 17, when an Iraqi warplane attacked the Navy frigate in the Persian Gulf. Surrounded by rows of headstones marking the graves of nearly 200,000 U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court Monday dismissed a lawsuit filed against military contractors by families of 37 sailors who died on the guided-missile frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf in 1987, on the grounds that permitting the case to proceed could expose military secrets. The Stark was on patrol on May 17, 1987, during the Iran-Iraq war, when it was struck by two Exocet missiles fired by an Iraqi fighter jet.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States has decided to ask Iraq for more than $75 million for the families of those killed in the Iraqi attack on the frigate Stark and for treatment of wounded and repairs to the ship, the New York Times reported. The paper said in its early Sunday edition that the State Department is expected to present Baghdad with the claim next month after it completes calculations on the dollar figure and consults with families of the 37 sailors who died.
NEWS
March 23, 1989
The United States said it has sent a high-level delegation to Iraq to press for compensation that Baghdad promised to families of American sailors killed in the 1987 attack on the frigate Stark. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said the delegation was led by Abraham D. Sofaer, the department's legal adviser, to persuade the Iraqis to pay the claims.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Iraq has agreed to pay $27.3 million in compensation to the families of 37 crew members killed when an Iraqi warplane attacked the U.S. Navy frigate Stark in 1987 in the Persian Gulf, the U.S. government announced Tuesday. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said the payment represents "full compensation" for the deaths. Although Iraq admitted responsibility and agreed to pay damages at the time of the attack, it took almost two years of haggling to fix the amount.
NEWS
March 23, 1989
The United States said it has sent a high-level delegation to Iraq to press for compensation that Baghdad promised to families of American sailors killed in the 1987 attack on the frigate Stark. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said the delegation was led by Abraham D. Sofaer, the department's legal adviser, to persuade the Iraqis to pay the claims.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States has decided to ask Iraq for more than $75 million for the families of those killed in the Iraqi attack on the frigate Stark and for treatment of wounded and repairs to the ship, the New York Times reported. The paper said in its early Sunday edition that the State Department is expected to present Baghdad with the claim next month after it completes calculations on the dollar figure and consults with families of the 37 sailors who died.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | United Press International
The Navy awarded a $14 million contract to the Sperry Corp. to restore the combat system of the frigate Stark, which was severely damaged in an attack by an Iraqi jet May 17, the Pentagon said Thursday. Restoration work by the Great Neck, N.Y., company is to be completed in September, 1988, the Pentagon said. The Iraqi F-1 Mirage fighter-bomber launched two missiles at the Stark in the Persian Gulf, killing 37 servicemen and wounding 21 others.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
An early test program to pinpoint ship danger points could have saved lives aboard the frigate Stark, which was hit May 17 by an Iraqi missile, a Defense Department official told Congress on Thursday. James O'Bryon, assistant deputy undersecretary of defense for the department's live-fire test program, also told a weapons acquisition panel that the Navy is considering improvements to reduce vulnerability in the FFG-7 class of ships, like the Stark.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
In the Reagan Administration's increasingly strident campaign to win congressional and public support for its plan to protect Kuwaiti tankers in the war-torn Persian Gulf, it is emphasizing two objectives: keeping the gulf open to international oil traffic and preempting a Soviet drive for greater influence in the area. Both goals seem vital to American interests, and U.S. policy-makers have pursued them for years under Democratic and Republican Presidents.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The wounded warship Stark steamed into home port Wednesday to a hero's welcome. The Perry-class guided-missile frigate, badly damaged in the Persian Gulf during a May 17 attack by an Iraqi warplane that left 37 sailors dead, was greeted by a brass band, the city's mayor and an ocean of yellow ribbons. "It's the biggest homecoming this city has ever seen," said Art Riccio, spokesman for the Mayport Naval Station on the outskirts of this northern Florida city.
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