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Starr Ranch Sanctuary

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Out here at the foot of the Saddleback Mountains, the deer are so plentiful that Pete DeSimone doesn't even look up anymore when he encounters one. And the deer usually aren't interested in him, either. Humans are a much rarer sight than wildlife at the 4,000-acre Starr Ranch Sanctuary that DeSimone manages for the National Audubon Society. To preserve native Southern California species and maintain a pristine environment for scientific studies, the Audubon Society keeps the public out.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2004 | DAN WEIKEL, Times Staff Writer
Deep in South County, where the subdivisions end, New California suddenly turns to Old California off Grey Rock road. The abrupt transition from tract homes to wild land occurs at the property line of Starr Ranch Sanctuary -- 4,000 acres of coastal sage scrub, chaparral and oak woodland that belong to the National Audubon Society.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
Humans are usually far outnumbered by animals in the Starr Ranch Sanctuary, but this weekend the public will get a chance to visit the private 4,000-acre wilderness preserve. On Saturday and Sunday, the public can accompany wildlife biologists as they search for raptor nests and attach identification bands to nestlings. "This is part of our research program and part of what we like to do occasionally--share with people and let them know what goes on here," Starr Ranch manager Pete DeSimone said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A hundred yards into Starr Ranch Sanctuary, it's like driving 100 years in the past. As the tiled-roof homes of the Dove Canyon community disappear in the rearview mirror, animals emerge from the woods and stare quizzically at the occasional vehicle driving by. Humans are the curiosities in this 4,000-acre preserve run by the National Audubon Society, which aims to keep it this way. The public is not invited, except for an occasional day every couple of years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
For the first time in more than 20 years, the public is being invited onto the 4,000-acre Starr Ranch Sanctuary. Since 1973, only wildlife researchers and Audubon Society members have been able to set foot onto the 4,000-acre refuge. But the environmental group wants to give the outside community a glimpse of how the sanctuary works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pete DeSimone, manager of the Starr Ranch Sanctuary, watched with slightly narrowed eyes Saturday morning as cars began filling up an open meadow. Nearby, vendors hawked T-shirts and soft drinks. "This is a little strange," DeSimone said softly, leaning against a flatbed truck. "This place is usually so quiet. But I expect the deer will be back a half-hour after it's over."
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pete DeSimone, manager of the Starr Ranch Sanctuary, watched with slightly narrowed eyes as cars began filling up an open meadow. Nearby, vendors hawked T-shirts and soft drinks. "This is a little strange," DeSimone said softly, leaning against a flatbed truck. "This place is usually so quiet. But I expect the deer will be back a half-hour after it's over."
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989 | JOHN CHARLES TIGHE, Times Staff Writer and
As a boy growing up in Northern California, Garth Chambers was surrounded by ancient oak trees that took on a near-legendary meaning for him. "Oak was the tree of substance," Chambers said. "You looked to the golden hills and they were spotted with the oaks." In Orange County these days, few children live near old oak trees, and being surrounded by wildlife in the canyon of a mountain range is usually just a play-land fantasy. At Dove Canyon, a 1,300-home planned community opening this weekend in southeast Orange County, Chambers, now a 43-year-old developer, has spent $1.1 million to preserve 113 oak and three sycamore trees, some that have grown on the land for more than 200 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2004 | DAN WEIKEL, Times Staff Writer
Deep in South County, where the subdivisions end, New California suddenly turns to Old California off Grey Rock road. The abrupt transition from tract homes to wild land occurs at the property line of Starr Ranch Sanctuary -- 4,000 acres of coastal sage scrub, chaparral and oak woodland that belong to the National Audubon Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A hundred yards into Starr Ranch Sanctuary, it's like driving 100 years in the past. As the tiled-roof homes of the Dove Canyon community disappear in the rearview mirror, animals emerge from the woods and stare quizzically at the occasional vehicle driving by. Humans are the curiosities in this 4,000-acre preserve run by the National Audubon Society, which aims to keep it this way. The public is not invited, except for an occasional day every couple of years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
Humans are usually far outnumbered by animals in the Starr Ranch Sanctuary, but this weekend the public will get a chance to visit the private 4,000-acre wilderness preserve. On Saturday and Sunday, the public can accompany wildlife biologists as they search for raptor nests and attach identification bands to nestlings. "This is part of our research program and part of what we like to do occasionally--share with people and let them know what goes on here," Starr Ranch manager Pete DeSimone said.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pete DeSimone, manager of the Starr Ranch Sanctuary, watched with slightly narrowed eyes as cars began filling up an open meadow. Nearby, vendors hawked T-shirts and soft drinks. "This is a little strange," DeSimone said softly, leaning against a flatbed truck. "This place is usually so quiet. But I expect the deer will be back a half-hour after it's over."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pete DeSimone, manager of the Starr Ranch Sanctuary, watched with slightly narrowed eyes Saturday morning as cars began filling up an open meadow. Nearby, vendors hawked T-shirts and soft drinks. "This is a little strange," DeSimone said softly, leaning against a flatbed truck. "This place is usually so quiet. But I expect the deer will be back a half-hour after it's over."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
For the first time in more than 20 years, the public is being invited onto the 4,000-acre Starr Ranch Sanctuary. Since 1973, only wildlife researchers and Audubon Society members have been able to set foot onto the 4,000-acre refuge. But the environmental group wants to give the outside community a glimpse of how the sanctuary works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Out here at the foot of the Saddleback Mountains, the deer are so plentiful that Pete DeSimone doesn't even look up anymore when he encounters one. And the deer usually aren't interested in him, either. Humans are a much rarer sight than wildlife at the 4,000-acre Starr Ranch Sanctuary that DeSimone manages for the National Audubon Society. To preserve native Southern California species and maintain a pristine environment for scientific studies, the Audubon Society keeps the public out.
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989 | JOHN CHARLES TIGHE, Times Staff Writer and
As a boy growing up in Northern California, Garth Chambers was surrounded by ancient oak trees that took on a near-legendary meaning for him. "Oak was the tree of substance," Chambers said. "You looked to the golden hills and they were spotted with the oaks." In Orange County these days, few children live near old oak trees, and being surrounded by wildlife in the canyon of a mountain range is usually just a play-land fantasy. At Dove Canyon, a 1,300-home planned community opening this weekend in southeast Orange County, Chambers, now a 43-year-old developer, has spent $1.1 million to preserve 113 oak and three sycamore trees, some that have grown on the land for more than 200 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992
Owling Trip--The Sea & Sage chapter of the National Audubon Society is sponsoring an owling trip Saturday to Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park and the Starr Ranch Sanctuary. The nighttime trip begins at 5 p.m. Participants will hear and see great horned owls, barn owls and screech owls. There is also a chance that a long-eared owl will be spotted. The trip will end about 10:30 p.m. For more information, contact the Sea & Sage chapter office at (714) 543-7393.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA
The public will have its first opportunity today to comment on a proposal to build 9,800 homes in the hills east of San Juan Capistrano and construct a major bypass of Interstate 5. "This project is going to draw a lot of attention once the word gets out about it," said Pete DeSimone, manager of the Audubon Society's Starr Ranch Sanctuary. "I'll be following this one." Officials of developer Santa Margarita Co.
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