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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008
RE "Hollywood's War Effort," by John Horn, April 30: Hollywood stars such as Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Clark Gable, Sterling Hayden and many others could easily have avoided service or chosen safe duties on bases in the U.S. in WWII but instead chose to serve on the front lines. Hollywood is often criticized for its indulgent lifestyle but many in the community, then and now, choose to be of service to their country and for humanity. Let's give recognition to those who do good as well as those who stain the image of Hollywood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For Allan Taylor, whose grandfather served in World War II and whose father saw action in Vietnam, Memorial Day has one overriding meaning. "It's about paying homage to those who have served," said Taylor, who sailed aboard the New Jersey off the coast of Beirut in 1983. "For me, a third-generation military man, it's mandatory. " Taylor, 47, of Oxnard, was among thousands who lined Sherman Way in Canoga Park for a parade with the theme "Saluting the Price of Freedom. " Under sunny skies across the Southland, trumpets blared, drums boomed and batons twirled as patriots from far and wide commemorated the nation's fallen servicemen and servicewomen at parades and cemeteries.
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NEWS
November 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Kenneth D. Zumwalt, a former civilian managing editor of the Stars and Stripes who authored a book on his wartime experiences with the military newspaper, has died at his San Diego home. He was 78. A retired assistant managing editor and Sunday editor of the San Diego Union, Zumwalt died in his sleep Wednesday of natural causes. Funeral services are pending. Zumwalt got his first newspaper job as an office boy at the Sacramento Union in 1938, four years before he enlisted in the Army.
SPORTS
March 7, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Mark Teixeira was a late scratch from the Team USA lineup for an exhibition game the other day. No worries, of course, as the United States boasts a gaggle of great first basemen. Teixeira could have been replaced by Prince Fielder, or Paul Konerko, or Ryan Howard. Alas, none of those guys are wearing the stars and stripes, so the country that invented baseball turned to utility man Ben Zobrist. The third edition of the World Baseball Classic is underway, with the U.S. making its debut Friday against Mexico.
SPORTS
January 13, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Stars and Stripes defeated AmericaOne and Prada beat Nippon today as both yachts stayed on track for a sailoff to determine the second finalist in the America's Cup challenger series in Auckland, New Zealand. Dennis Conner's Stars and Stripes beat AmericaOne, which has already qualified as one of the finalists, by 22 seconds. Prada had an easier time, defeating Nippon by 2:01. Prada is in second place with seven points, one ahead of Stars and Stripes.
SPORTS
June 13, 1989 | From Reuters
An order to impound the America's Cup catamaran Stars and Stripes for nonpayment of a debt has been lifted, the U.S. marshal's office reported today. A spokesman for the marshal's office said a court order was received late Friday to lift the lien placed on the boat and other property of Sail America, which organized the defense of yachting's premier trophy last year. Several containers of equipment, including the disassembled catamaran used to defeat New Zealand 2-0 last September, were seized on June 5 by the U.S. government for nonpayment of a $225,000 debt owed to North Sails Group Inc. Jay Hansen of North Sails said the board of directors had unanimously voted to drop the lawsuit and attempt to work out a payment plan with Sail America, now called the America's Cup Organizing Committee.
NEWS
September 30, 2001
In response to "For Some, an Unflagging Discomfort About Flying the Stars and Stripes" (Sept. 18) about flying the flag, may I offer this to Roger Lowenstein, Ira Glass and anyone else who has to "think about" flying a flag: I am flying the flag in rage, that some 5,000 people were murdered (and their families' lives ruined) for no better reason than they showed up for work on a Tuesday morning. I am flying the flag in pride that some heroic passengers, who realized their method of transport had suddenly become a terrorist weapon, chose to go down fighting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For Allan Taylor, whose grandfather served in World War II and whose father saw action in Vietnam, Memorial Day has one overriding meaning. "It's about paying homage to those who have served," said Taylor, who sailed aboard the New Jersey off the coast of Beirut in 1983. "For me, a third-generation military man, it's mandatory. " Taylor, 47, of Oxnard, was among thousands who lined Sherman Way in Canoga Park for a parade with the theme "Saluting the Price of Freedom. " Under sunny skies across the Southland, trumpets blared, drums boomed and batons twirled as patriots from far and wide commemorated the nation's fallen servicemen and servicewomen at parades and cemeteries.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "hometown" newspaper of American GIs in Europe, The Stars and Stripes, is preparing to go to war again. The European edition is printing 190,000 copies a day, up from the usual 140,000, and is flying the paper to Saudi Arabia, where it is distributed to U.S. troops. But with more than 230,000 U.S. servicemen and women in that region, all starved for news, "there's still not enough to go around," says Managing Editor Bob Wicker. The staff of "Stripes," as it is familiarly known, tries to deliver the paper to soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines within a day or two of publication, depending on the vagaries of the airlift system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2009
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The fog of Abbottabad strikes again. On Tuesday, confusion continued to swirl around Esquire magazine's cover story about the Navy SEAL who killed Osama bin Laden during the instantly legendary May 2011 raid on the terrorist leader's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The article, which was published online Monday, is framed around the premise that the SEAL, dubbed the Shooter, got "nothing" from the government after his retirement, including no healthcare coverage. According to officials and experts, that claim was incorrect : All Iraq and Afghanistan veterans get five years of healthcare benefits after retirement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
The enormously moving documentary "Honor Flight" proves a deft snapshot of a worthy nonprofit group as well as a profound tribute to America's brave, often unsung World War II veterans. Director Dan Hayes spotlights the Milwaukee-based Stars and Stripes Honor Flight, one of 117 volunteer hubs across the U.S. that raises money to fly WWII vets to Washington, D.C., to visit the National World War II Memorial. Since roughly 900 WWII vets reportedly die each day, the clock is ticking for these elderly ex-soldiers for whom this special trip may well be their last.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Once on a flight to Warsaw in the 1990s, when the Polish airline LOT was still trying to get the hang of market economy, I requested a vegetarian meal. For the first course, I was served the same salad of iceberg lettuce and thousand-island dressing as everyone around me. But my hot entrée, I discovered as I peeled away the foil, was another helping of that salad zapped in the microwave. It took a minute or two for the Pole sitting next to me to stop laughing and wipe his tears away, but he then described how fabulous Polish vegetarian cooking could be. He suggested several dishes I try once I landed and told me where to find them.
SPORTS
September 1, 2012 | Diane Pucin
Andy Roddick said no to retirement Friday night at the U.S. Open. He said no when he whipped 13 aces past 19-year-old Australian Bernard Tomic. He said no with his willingness to chase down lobs, to rush the net, to manage his emotions and play quick-strike tennis. Roddick, who turned 30 Thursday on the day he announced this tournament would be his last, extended his career by beating Tomic, 6-3, 6-4, 6-0, in the second round. Up next for Roddick, who won his only Grand Slam tournament title here in 2003, is 59th-ranked Fabio Fognini of Italy, which seems to give Roddick a path into the second week of the Open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2011 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
In this part of California's Central Valley, where the city turns to country and the flatlands to hills, there stands a barn painted like an American flag. It was built amid the open fields that stretch along California 41 — a gateway to Yosemite National Park — and it's a rural slice of America the Beautiful. Spacious skies? Check. Purple mountain majesties? That would be the Sierra Nevada. In the 10 years since the barn got a red-white-and-blue makeover, it's become a bit of an icon in a region sometimes called the Bible Belt of California and the Midwest of the West.
SPORTS
June 19, 2011 | By Teddy Greenstein and Jeff Shain
Luke Donald has two letters on his mind: R and R. "My wife [ Diane ] and I will take a little vacation in Italy for six days," he said Sunday after a disappointing performance at the U.S. Open. "I'll put my feet up. " Donald has been grinding since mid-May, tying for fourth at the Players championship in Florida, finishing as the runner-up in the Volvo Match Play in Spain, winning the BMW PGA Championship in England and tying for seventh at the Memorial in Ohio. Four tournaments in four weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1985
It is not hard to understand where McCalden's loyalty lies. He probably still flies the Union Jack above the Stars and Stripes. EDWARD G. GILLEN North Hollywood
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | Reuters
Shanghai's best-selling T-shirt, which bears the design of the American flag, has been banned by city authorities, who say patriotic Chinese should not wear such clothing. The Shanghai Liberation Daily said high-level officials ordered the ban because the shirts, 30,000 of which had been sold, "were having a bad effect on society."
OPINION
May 9, 2011 | Gregory Rodriguez
President Obama tried to use the announcement of the death of Osama bin Laden to get Americans to think big again. The successful end of a 10-year manhunt, he declared last week, was a "testament to the greatness of our country and the determination of the American people. " But Bin Laden's death instead seemed to feed stubborn domestic divisions and conjure thorny geopolitical stalemates. Maybe the president should take a different tack to get the public to embrace the "big things" rhetoric he launched in January's State of the Union address.
OPINION
June 14, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Poor Flag Day. It has to be the single most ignored national holiday in an otherwise patriotic country that loves its holidays — and no, it's not just because we don't get the day off. Nor is it because Flag Day gets lost between Memorial Day and the Fourth of July. The real reason that most Americans ignore the June 14 holiday is that it's utterly redundant. In the United States, every day is Flag Day. That's right. In this flag-crazy world, Americans are arguably the most obsessed with our national banner.
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