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NEWS
July 24, 1989 | From United Press International
Brig. Gen. Emsley M. Llewellyn, who served on Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's staff during World War II and organized and edited the Stars and Stripes newspaper, has died. He was 83. Llewellyn died Wednesday in Tacoma after a long illness, family members disclosed. He was born in Spanaway, Wash., on Oct. 10, 1905, and lived in Tacoma most of his life. He owned Llewellyn Advertising Agency for many years and also managed several local political campaigns.
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NEWS
February 21, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Pentagon report released Tuesday said that the Air Force colonel who resigned last week as editor of the Pacific Stars and Stripes newspaper violated military regulations by manipulating the paper's news content. Col. Edwin J. Montgomery resigned Friday, citing the report by ombudsman Philip Foisie.
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NEWS
November 16, 1988
The U.S. Armed Forces European Stars and Stripes newspaper said it has removed copies of Adolf Hitler's autobiography "Mein Kampf" from the 158 bookstores it operates in West Germany after discovering that sales of the book are banned. The newspaper said 600 copies of the book, in which Hitler outlined his goals before he came to power, were removed from the stores that serve U.S. military personnel and their families.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon eventually will replace the military editors of the armed services newspaper Stars & Stripes with civilians, a Defense Department spokesman said Monday. The development follows a recommendation made last year in a study by the General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress that said it found evidence of censorship and improper management at the government-run daily.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Pentagon report released Tuesday said that the Air Force colonel who resigned last week as editor of the Pacific Stars and Stripes newspaper violated military regulations by manipulating the paper's news content. Col. Edwin J. Montgomery resigned Friday, citing the report by ombudsman Philip Foisie.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon eventually will replace the military editors of the armed services newspaper Stars & Stripes with civilians, a Defense Department spokesman said Monday. The development follows a recommendation made last year in a study by the General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress that said it found evidence of censorship and improper management at the government-run daily.
NEWS
January 22, 1999
Nicholas J. Corea, 56, television writer, director and producer who worked on such series as "The Incredible Hulk" and "Walker, Texas Ranger." Born and brought up in St. Louis, Corea served in Vietnam as a Marine sergeant, earning a Purple Heart. Later he wrote for the Stars and Stripes newspaper. He also worked several years as a member of the St. Louis Police Department, turning those experiences into a novel, "A Cleaner Breed," published in 1974.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1991 | Associated Press
The European edition of Stars and Stripes newspaper, a main source of news for U.S. soldiers, is raising its prices due to inflationary pressures that caused losses of more than $570,000 last year. The daily newspaper claims a circulation of 200,000 and currently costs 25 cents. As of Feb. 1, the price will be 35 cents Monday through Saturday, and 50 cents for the Sunday editions.
NEWS
October 11, 1986 | Associated Press
An anti-alcohol drive has succeeded so well that the U.S. Army in West Germany will have to run a lottery next year to make up for lost liquor revenue, U.S. military officials said Friday. They said money raised by the lottery will be used for recreational and sports programs for American soldiers in Europe. Rex Gribble, spokesman at the U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1985 | United Press International
A civilian employee of the U.S. Army has been arrested by German police on suspicion of planting five primitive fire bombs around a U.S. installation, the Stars and Stripes newspaper said Friday. The unofficial U.S. armed forces daily identified the suspect as Bonnie M. Martin, 21, and said she was being held at a West German federal prison in Zweibruecken for psychiatric evaluation.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | From United Press International
Brig. Gen. Emsley M. Llewellyn, who served on Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower's staff during World War II and organized and edited the Stars and Stripes newspaper, has died. He was 83. Llewellyn died Wednesday in Tacoma after a long illness, family members disclosed. He was born in Spanaway, Wash., on Oct. 10, 1905, and lived in Tacoma most of his life. He owned Llewellyn Advertising Agency for many years and also managed several local political campaigns.
NEWS
November 16, 1988
The U.S. Armed Forces European Stars and Stripes newspaper said it has removed copies of Adolf Hitler's autobiography "Mein Kampf" from the 158 bookstores it operates in West Germany after discovering that sales of the book are banned. The newspaper said 600 copies of the book, in which Hitler outlined his goals before he came to power, were removed from the stores that serve U.S. military personnel and their families.
NEWS
April 6, 1996 | Associated Press
Five days before the plane crash in Croatia that took the lives of Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and 34 others, the commander of the plane's squadron was relieved from duty because he allegedly told superiors that such flights were unsafe, Stars and Stripes newspaper reported in today's editions. A U.S. Air Force spokesman confirmed that Lt. Col. James Albright was relieved on March 29 after he had raised safety concerns but denied that there was any link between the two actions.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | Associated Press
A Dutch soldier left behind by his unit during NATO maneuvers guarded a bridge in the West German countryside for five days, a newspaper said Wednesday. Sympathetic local villagers brought food and drink to Dutch soldier Johann Romers, 19, who last week refused to leave his post at the Leine River in northern West Germany, the Stars and Stripes newspaper said. The guard became especially noticeable to West German police after other Dutch soldiers had left the area, said the U.S.
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