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Stas Namin

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February 28, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Soviet rock superstar bands Stas Namin and Rondo had Americans standing on their feet and screaming for more when they appeared in Anchorage, Alaska, over the weekend. "Ya looblyoo tolka rock 'n' roll," sang Sasha Losev, lead singer of the Stas Namin group, in teaching some 4,500 people the Russian lyrics to the band's song, "I love only rock 'n' roll." The Stas Namin group, once banned in the Soviet Union, has sold 40 million records to Soviet rock fans.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003 | Henry Turner, Special to The Times
Stas Namin is something of a Russian phenomenon -- businessman, filmmaker, music and television producer, photographer -- and those are just his sidelines. In the '70s and '80s, he was one of Russia's biggest rock stars; his group Flowers sold 60 million records. Branded a dissident by Soviet authorities, he was forbidden to leave Russia until perestroika. Later he toured the world, playing with Frank Zappa, Bon Jovi and Kenny Loggins, and collaborating on an album with Keith Richards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Alexei Belov, the blond lead guitarist for the Soviet rock group Gorky Park, got up early enough on his first morning home in months to make the 45-minute drive from his parents' apartment to Lenin Stadium by 10 a.m. Belov, who speaks English well, seemed a bit self-conscious when he found himself almost alone in the huge, 100,000-capacity stadium, which was built in 1955 and upgraded for the 1980 Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Alexei Belov, the blond lead guitarist for the Soviet rock group Gorky Park, got up early enough on his first morning home in months to make the 45-minute drive from his parents' apartment to Lenin Stadium by 10 a.m. Belov, who speaks English well, seemed a bit self-conscious when he found himself almost alone in the huge, 100,000-capacity stadium, which was built in 1955 and upgraded for the 1980 Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003 | Henry Turner, Special to The Times
Stas Namin is something of a Russian phenomenon -- businessman, filmmaker, music and television producer, photographer -- and those are just his sidelines. In the '70s and '80s, he was one of Russia's biggest rock stars; his group Flowers sold 60 million records. Branded a dissident by Soviet authorities, he was forbidden to leave Russia until perestroika. Later he toured the world, playing with Frank Zappa, Bon Jovi and Kenny Loggins, and collaborating on an album with Keith Richards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1986 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Stas Namin, who might best be described as the Soviets' Bruce Springsteen, will bring his popular rock band to Los Angeles and 10 other American cities for the first time this fall on a joint U.S.-Soviet musical production tour called "Peace Child," it was announced here Monday. Stas Namin has reportedly sold 25 million records in eastern bloc countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
When was the last time you heard a band kick out with "Back in the U.S.S.R." and really be singing from experience? Probably never--unless you were one of the 200 or so people packed into At My Place in Santa Monica on Wednesday night to see Stas Namin and his six-piece band, live and direct from Moscow, where they reportedly have been the hottest thing since the samovar for more than 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1986 | BARBARA PEPE
"It's a great country for sure . . . I enjoy the people very much because they're so open, so warm-hearted . . . very similar to our country. It was strange to see on the other side of the planet people who are very similar." Stas Namin, who is billed as one of the premier rock 'n' roll attractions in the Soviet Union, was offering his first impressions of the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Vince Neil, the colorfully tattooed lead singer of Los Angeles' garish heavy-metal band Motley Crue, wasted little time in introducing more than 180,000 Soviet rock fans over the weekend to the often raunchy world of hard-core rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Soviet rock superstar bands Stas Namin and Rondo had Americans standing on their feet and screaming for more when they appeared in Anchorage, Alaska, over the weekend. "Ya looblyoo tolka rock 'n' roll," sang Sasha Losev, lead singer of the Stas Namin group, in teaching some 4,500 people the Russian lyrics to the band's song, "I love only rock 'n' roll." The Stas Namin group, once banned in the Soviet Union, has sold 40 million records to Soviet rock fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet rock music, on a roll for a year or more in this Gorbachev era of glasnost , has become a politically divisive issue. In ever stronger counterpoint, conservative critics, using language that strangely echoes the hysterical anti-rock sentiments heard in the West, have charged that the popularity of rock is a threat to the nation's moral fiber and possibly even a plot by anti-Communist strategists in the West. Rock musicians scoff at the allegations.
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