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NATIONAL
August 10, 2010 | Michael Memoli, Los Angeles Times
The House of Representatives on Tuesday approved a $26.1-billion package of state aid that would help keep nearly 140,000 teachers nationwide on the job and continue extra funding to provide healthcare services to low-income households during the recession. The final vote was 247-161, largely along party lines. The legislation now heads to President Obama's desk for his signature. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had called lawmakers back from their August recess to vote on the bill after it advanced from the Senate last week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO - In an unusual effort to bolster financial aid for undergraduates, UC on Wednesday publicly launched an online crowdfunding campaign that has movie stars, politicians, students and faculty pledging to host parties, lead hikes, sing rap songs and work in soup kitchens to win donations. The Promise for Education campaign, which will last six weeks, is designed in part to attract donations from young alumni and others who might not respond to more traditional fundraising appeals but may be intrigued by a social media one and donate to a particular person's activity.
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NATIONAL
June 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Bill Owens announced $600,000 in state aid to help the town of Granby recover from last week's bulldozer rampage by an armed man that virtually destroyed half a dozen buildings and badly damaged at least six more. State officials also said they would help people who lost their jobs -- if not their workplaces -- with a "fast-response team" developed to help employees laid off from major corporations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
San Francisco's city attorney Thursday filed two legal challenges to block a private panel from revoking the accreditation of City College of San Francisco. City Atty. Dennis J. Herrera is suing the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, alleging that the panel is biased against the college and its advocates because of differing agendas. The college encourages broad access to its educational and vocational programs rather than narrowly focusing on degree completion, while the accrediting panel has supported more restrictive policies, according to the lawsuit filed in San Francisco Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999
Although a site has yet to be selected, Ventura County supervisors have agreed to apply for $40.5 million in state grants to build a juvenile justice detention center. Submission of the grant application to the state Board of Corrections will mean that the county agrees to pay $25 million of the project's estimated cost of $65 million. It also pledges to staff the facility, which could require hiring up to 98 additional probation officers by 2010.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER
The White House was calling. Not the Oval Office White House with some important pronouncement. This was the Media Relations White House, a group of staffers that oversees the ebb and flow of the more mundane events staged near the mansion's West Wing, where the press hangs out.
NEWS
May 8, 1989
Federal and state aid to city governments has declined to the lowest level since 1967, providing only about 20 cents of every municipal revenue dollar in fiscal 1986-87, the Census Bureau said. By contrast, in the mid-1970s, federal and state aid to city governments rose to a high of 32 cents of each dollar in city revenues. According to a new Census Bureau report, federal aid to cities in 1987 amounted to 5 cents of each dollar in revenue and state aid provided another 15 cents. Federal revenues peaked at 13 cents in 1978, while state revenues reached 22 cents per dollar in 1975, the bureau said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writers
In his first public comments on the issue, Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday rejected San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor's assertion that he needs to be educated about the city's worsening drug and gang problem. The governor also lightly upbraided O'Connor for going public with a dramatic proposal for increased state aid for the city without first running it by him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1986 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Threatened with a loss of millions of dollars in state aid, the Southern California Rapid Transit District set itself the goal Thursday of reducing absenteeism among bus drivers by nearly 20% over the next three years. And, despite months of critical public scrutiny of the RTD, the board gave General Manager John Dyer a vote of confidence, unanimously approving a 5.3% raise that will boost his annual salary to $119,000.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
School officials are trying to figure out how to live with a $750,000 cut in state aid without harming academic programs. Gov. George Deukmejian last month vetoed $86 million in the 1986-87 budget for Urban Impact Aid, which has been provided to districts with high percentages of welfare-dependant or transient families, and bilingual students. About 35% of the Inglewood district's approximately 16,000 students are bilingual, and about 25% are from families that receive welfare.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Although the state's unemployment rate is at its lowest level in almost four years and the number of employed Californians is growing, labor experts see a different reality: Full-time work has faded in many industries. Nubia Calderón Barillas, 32, left a job in retail in May for a housekeeping job at the Holiday Inn LAX that promised better pay and steady work. But nearly nine months later, the mother of three said, she rarely works more than two days a week. She has asked for more hours, she said, but to no avail, even in an industry that set a new peak employment level last year.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Gov. Jerry Brown has thrown his support behind expanding Medi-Cal, the health insurance program for impoverished Californians, to the full extent authorized by the 2010 federal healthcare reform law. It was the right choice, and Brown deserves credit for recognizing that the benefits to public health and the economy outweigh the potential costs. But his budget proposal left state lawmakers to decide whether to keep responsibility for the expanded program in Sacramento or hand it off to the counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2012 | By Larry Gordon and Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
UC Berkeley announced a $1-million grant Tuesday to boost financial aid for undocumented students, which is thought to be the largest gift of its kind in the nation. The donation from the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund will supplement state aid for undocumented students that is scheduled to roll out over the next two semesters in a policy change authorized by the California Dream Act. Undocumented students will be eligible for state aid but not for federal grants or loans, and the donation - along with other private funds - will help fill in the gaps, officials said.
OPINION
October 2, 2012
The day Gov. Jerry Brown took office in 2011, the state budget was more than $25 billion in the red - the latest installment in a long-running drama of boom-and-bust budgeting. Since then, lawmakers have slashed billions of dollars from education, health, public safety and community development programs, reducing the general fund to the smallest share of the economy in 40 years. Barring a miraculously speedy turnaround in the economy, however, the budget will remain far out of balance for the next several years unless Sacramento raises revenue or cuts spending by a draconian $6 billion annually.
OPINION
July 1, 2012
A photo of a man building a house may look exactly like a picture of him making repairs or one of him taking the place apart brick by brick, so it can be hard to tell whether a snapshot shows the beginning, the middle or the end of a major project. And so it is with this year's state budget: Are we watching California being put back together or witnessing its demolition? A generation of Californians has lived through several spasms of financial restructuring, some of which hit us from outside, some of which we created ourselves.
OPINION
May 31, 2012
America being the land of instant gratification, its residents tend to save far less than their foreign counterparts do - when they save anything at all. As a result, millions of people are heading into retirement with little more than their Social Security benefits to sustain them. Fearful that many will wind up dependent on state aid to get by, California Sen. Kevin De Leon (D-Los Angeles) wants to create a state-run but privately insured pension program that prompts more workers to save for their dotage.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State transportation authorities have sent two powerful signals to Los Angeles County transportation planners in recent days that they are serious about providing substantial financial aid soon for commuter rail projects in the Southland. First, in unveiling proposed guidelines scheduled to be adopted in early December for the distribution of $1.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court intervened in the disputed Cleveland voucher case Friday and cleared the way for more students to receive state tuition subsidies to enroll in religious schools. The high court, acting on a 5-4 vote, overturned a federal judge's order that blocked new students from taking advantage of the voucher program while the Cleveland case moves through the courts. The emergency order sends another strong signal that the court's conservative majority believes vouchers are constitutional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
When Jackie Morgan MacDougall and other parents learned that their Saugus Union School District received the least state aid of any district in the county, she said they had to act. With the state contemplating deeper aid cuts, MacDougall and others began circulating petitions to create an education foundation — a nonprofit organization in which community members raise funds for teacher grants, instructional equipment, extracurricular activities...
NATIONAL
January 11, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
On Wednesday, 28 seventh- and eighth-graders at Tucson's Mansfeld Middle School followed their familiar routine. They walked into Room 306, sat at their desks and greeted teacher Rene Martinez. But the class they'd known the day before had vanished. No longer can the students discuss Chicano perspectives on history. And no longer can Martinez teach Mexican American studies. After the Tucson Unified School District board voted late Tuesday to suspend the controversial classes to avoid losing more than $14 million in state aid, the students' world shifted.
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