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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990
An attempt by two members of the state Allocation Board to revoke $50 million granted the Los Angeles Unified School District for acquisition of the Ambassador Hotel site was narrowly defeated in Sacramento on Wednesday. The two said the school board has not delivered a convincing guarantee that it wouldn't ask for more funds. The attempt was defeated on a 3-3 tie. The seventh member abstained.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2000
As assistant superintendent for a small, rural school district, I take issue with your Dec. 15 editorial, "Break for Neediest School Districts." The new rules for state school construction funding adopted by the State Allocation Board will not more fairly distribute state school construction funds. These new rules define "need" for state funds based solely on the relative overcrowding in each school district competing for these funds. The new rules ignore, however, the relative need for state funding.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1996 | JEFF KASS
A state agency has approved the building plans for what would be California's first space-saver school, clearing the way for the State Allocation Board later this month to consider budgeting $25 million for the project. If the money is approved, construction would begin by December, said Mike Vail, senior director of facilities for Santa Ana Unified School District. The intermediate school would then be open for classes by September 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Los Angeles school construction program got a boost Wednesday when the state agency that distributes funds set aside $450 million for California's most overcrowded school districts. The money, about a third of the remaining construction funds from the 1998 state school bond, will not be available until June 2002, about the time that L.A. Unified officials expect to submit applications for several high school projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Los Angeles school construction program got a boost Wednesday when the state agency that distributes funds set aside $450 million for California's most overcrowded school districts. The money, about a third of the remaining construction funds from the 1998 state school bond, will not be available until June 2002, about the time that L.A. Unified officials expect to submit applications for several high school projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1990
Initially, I was amazed at the school board's insistence on selecting the Ambassador Hotel site for a new high school. Now that the State Allocation Board has approved $50 million for the acquisition of two-thirds of the site, I am shocked! Goldberg insists on placing the interest of our high school students above the redevelopment of the Ambassador site and the economic welfare of our community. We all agree on the necessity and urgency of a new high school. But the Ambassador site is ideal for a world-class hotel and major office complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2000
As assistant superintendent for a small, rural school district, I take issue with your Dec. 15 editorial, "Break for Neediest School Districts." The new rules for state school construction funding adopted by the State Allocation Board will not more fairly distribute state school construction funds. These new rules define "need" for state funds based solely on the relative overcrowding in each school district competing for these funds. The new rules ignore, however, the relative need for state funding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998
Not only did your Jan. 28 editorial, "Belmont: Bad Decisions Mount," misconstrue the actions of the Board of Education, but it also led your readers to assume that the board did not wish to give any documents to Assemblyman Scott Wildman (D-Los Angeles), by not mentioning that LAUSD has already shared thousands of documents with him. I had asked the board not to make a decision on this matter until more information was provided. With regard to Belmont, there is no turning back. The majority of the board made the decision to move forward with this project many months ago. Although I never supported the grandiose public-private venture involving the high school, everyone acknowledges we need a new school in this underserved area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1994
Minutes of a closed meeting, Santa Ana Unified School District board-- as I envision them: Board member 1: Let's buy 11 acres from Bristol Market Place for $23 million. They're stuck with the land and can't use it for anything else. Board member 2: Boy, that's almost $46 a square foot and we can buy land on the open market for $15 to $18 a square foot. Board member 3: That doesn't make any difference, this is free money from the state; we need money and the state gives it away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS
The boards of the Rio and Pleasant Valley elementary school districts have decided to apply for a total of about $4 million of state bond money for renovating schools, officials said. Each of the school boards voted at special meetings last week to apply for Proposition 152 funds. The statewide $1.9-billion bond measure was approved by voters in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999
Re "Panel Votes 4-3 for Completion of Belmont Project," Oct. 21: The wealthiest people in history, we have chosen to cover our landscape with strip malls, automobile sales lots and expensive sports stadiums, while making only derelict and polluted land available for our children's schools. We should stop claiming to value education or the family, because our actions and our spending decisions drown out our words. Until we are able to point to our schools with the same pride our civic leaders now lavish on a mere hockey stadium, we will continue to be a society of private luxury and public poverty, rife with hypocrisy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998
Not only did your Jan. 28 editorial, "Belmont: Bad Decisions Mount," misconstrue the actions of the Board of Education, but it also led your readers to assume that the board did not wish to give any documents to Assemblyman Scott Wildman (D-Los Angeles), by not mentioning that LAUSD has already shared thousands of documents with him. I had asked the board not to make a decision on this matter until more information was provided. With regard to Belmont, there is no turning back. The majority of the board made the decision to move forward with this project many months ago. Although I never supported the grandiose public-private venture involving the high school, everyone acknowledges we need a new school in this underserved area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
While heavy equipment dug deeply into hillsides near downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday to make way for a new high school, state officials meeting here refused to promise $40 million toward the costly campus until Los Angeles Unified School District attorneys prove to them that the project is legal. State Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1996 | JEFF KASS
A state agency has approved the building plans for what would be California's first space-saver school, clearing the way for the State Allocation Board later this month to consider budgeting $25 million for the project. If the money is approved, construction would begin by December, said Mike Vail, senior director of facilities for Santa Ana Unified School District. The intermediate school would then be open for classes by September 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial proposal to construct an innovative, "space-saver" school here has been dealt another blow with a finding by state officials that the site chosen for the project was not properly appraised. A report prepared by state real estate officials concludes that the appraisals of the selected site, which is in a section of the Bristol MarketPlace shopping center, are not valid, one of its authors said Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State officials have issued their strongest condemnation yet of a controversial proposal to build a middle school with state funds in a shopping center here, and they have set a vote for next month on whether to revoke $22.7 million set aside for the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial proposal to construct an innovative, "space-saver" school here has been dealt another blow with a finding by state officials that the site chosen for the project was not properly appraised. A report prepared by state real estate officials concludes that the appraisals of the selected site, which is in a section of the Bristol MarketPlace shopping center, are not valid, one of its authors said Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1994
In response to your editorial, "A Vote for Darkness" (March 24): The first rule of elected officials should be to conduct the public business in public. Also, it does appear that legislative bodies of public agencies do too often use excuses to meet behind closed doors. To attempt to link these statements to the Santa Ana Unified School District trustees' action to censure one of its own reflects a lack of understanding of the issue in question and confused knowledge of the law. The issue was the procedure utilized to release confidential documents and not what price was offered or paid for school sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1994
In response to your editorial, "A Vote for Darkness" (March 24): The first rule of elected officials should be to conduct the public business in public. Also, it does appear that legislative bodies of public agencies do too often use excuses to meet behind closed doors. To attempt to link these statements to the Santa Ana Unified School District trustees' action to censure one of its own reflects a lack of understanding of the issue in question and confused knowledge of the law. The issue was the procedure utilized to release confidential documents and not what price was offered or paid for school sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1994
Minutes of a closed meeting, Santa Ana Unified School District board-- as I envision them: Board member 1: Let's buy 11 acres from Bristol Market Place for $23 million. They're stuck with the land and can't use it for anything else. Board member 2: Boy, that's almost $46 a square foot and we can buy land on the open market for $15 to $18 a square foot. Board member 3: That doesn't make any difference, this is free money from the state; we need money and the state gives it away.
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