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State Allocation Board

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1990
It's an enigma. When is it wrong to be honest when you are convinced that what is honest is wrong? The Los Angeles Unified School District wishes to build a high school on the site of the abandoned Ambassador Hotel on Wilshire Boulevard. Approximately one year ago, the Trump-Wilshire Group bought these 23 acres for $60-plus million. The school district, by the power of eminent domain, wishes to take 17 acres, all but the strip along Wilshire Boulevard. The district values that land at slightly under $50 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999
Re "Panel Votes 4-3 for Completion of Belmont Project," Oct. 21: The wealthiest people in history, we have chosen to cover our landscape with strip malls, automobile sales lots and expensive sports stadiums, while making only derelict and polluted land available for our children's schools. We should stop claiming to value education or the family, because our actions and our spending decisions drown out our words. Until we are able to point to our schools with the same pride our civic leaders now lavish on a mere hockey stadium, we will continue to be a society of private luxury and public poverty, rife with hypocrisy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, Times Staff Writer
Since the asbestos-filled Avalon gymnasium was torn down two months ago, Long Beach Unified School District officials have been searching for funds to replace it. The building served as the recreation center for Santa Catalina Island residents and school children. Next week, district officials will travel to Sacramento to meet informally with state officials as they plan their strategy for renewing their request for funds from the State Allocation Board. The board has given the district approval to build a 6,000-square-foot gym, estimated to cost $1.2 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
While heavy equipment dug deeply into hillsides near downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday to make way for a new high school, state officials meeting here refused to promise $40 million toward the costly campus until Los Angeles Unified School District attorneys prove to them that the project is legal. State Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State officials have issued their strongest condemnation yet of a controversial proposal to build a middle school with state funds in a shopping center here, and they have set a vote for next month on whether to revoke $22.7 million set aside for the project.
NEWS
August 10, 1986 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Acting against the advice of the state Department of Education and risking possible loss of funding and a lengthy legal battle, the Lynwood Unified School District Board of Education has voted to acquire property on Imperial Highway for a new high school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Ana Unified School District is no longer in danger of losing $23 million in state funding that had been set aside for a controversial school slated to be built at a shopping center here, a state official has said. The state set the money aside based on a preliminary appraisal of the Bristol Marketplace site by the school district.
NEWS
September 24, 1987
Preliminary plans for the expansion and renovation of Mark Keppel, Alhambra and San Gabriel high schools will be submitted to the Alhambra school board at its meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the district administration building, 15 W. Alhambra Road. The state Allocation Board has approved funds for architectural planning of a $36-million construction project at the three schools in place of an earlier proposal to build a new high school in Rosemead or Monterey Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The State Allocation Board has refused to pay for covered walkways and excess landscaping for the William S. Hart Union High School District's planned junior high, a decision that will cost the district more than $500,000. Hart district officials were seeking an even split of the school's $12.68-million cost. The state board approved matching funds for only $11.63 million in construction costs, leaving the district to pay the remaining $1 million.
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