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State Budget Crisis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2009 | Jessica Garrison
The roving television reporter Huell Howser stood on the bright green lawn in front of a new apartment complex in the city of Signal Hill and, as the camera rolled, gushed about the marvels of redevelopment policy. "Your idea was to take one of the most blighted areas in the entire city and . . . do something with it?" Howser asked. "That was a tall order, wasn't it? Was it almost insurmountable?" City Manager Ken Farfsing nodded. "Without redevelopment this project . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman has turned his cameras on a mental hospital, dance troupes, a racetrack, the military and a state legislature. His 38th documentary examines education, campus leadership and student protest at UC Berkeley in 2010 during the state budget crisis. Edited from 250 hours' worth of material, his "At Berkeley" is a four-hour, four-minute tour, without narration, of literature classes, robotics labs, football games and the inner sanctums of administrators facing tough decisions on a beautiful campus.
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OPINION
December 22, 2009
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is in the process of crafting a budget for the coming fiscal year that must close a nearly $21-billion gap between expected revenue and required spending, so a little lashing out is understandable. But he's seen enough disastrous budget years now to know how readily -- and wrongly -- many people blame the state's problem on illegal immigration. So it's a shame that the governor fueled just that sort of thinking in televised comments over the weekend. It's probably true, as Schwarzenegger said Sunday on "State of the Union" on CNN, that California pays "approximately a billion dollars for the incarceration of undocumented immigrants" and gets only $100 million in return.
OPINION
January 3, 2013 | By Darrell Steinberg, Karen Bass, Dave Cogdill and Mike Villines
This Op-Ed has been updated to reflect passage of the "fical cliff" bill. Congress may have avoided certain disaster on Tuesday, but the plan that was passed does little to get the country back to a functional system of budgeting that doesn't involve chronic deficits. So what would that take? Republicans will have to recognize that raising taxes on high-income earners is a necessity. Democrats will need to agree to budget cuts and entitlement savings. That may sound impossible, but recent history demonstrates it isn't.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | DANIEL AKST
For individual investors who get a chance at some of the IOUs California is issuing during its ongoing budget crisis, there's only one word: lucky. Far from a raw deal, these so-called registered warrants, which came to about $1.9 billion Monday, can be pretty appealing. They offer 5% interest, and since individuals get that free of state and federal taxes, the effective yield is higher. The IOUs are an administrative headache, sure, but apparently they're no migraine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
At least five Republicans and six Democrats in the state Assembly have crossed party lines and joined forces to call for an immediate, comprehensive review of state government as they search for a solution to California's money troubles by June. The lawmakers said they are not trying to topple Democratic Assembly Speaker Herb J. Wesson Jr. or Republican minority leader Dave Cox.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the nation's large retail chains on Thursday reported modest sales increases for August, but sales in California appeared to lag behind, in part because of the long state budget crisis. Nationwide retail sales rose an average of 4.7% compared to the same period last year despite a late Labor Day holiday, which delayed back-to-school shopping. Labor Day, which traditionally marks the end of summer vacation, falls a week later this year than in 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2002 | Gregg Jones and Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Gray Davis said Thursday he will call a special session of the Legislature on Dec. 9 to consider $5 billion in spending cuts and other emergency steps to "staunch the bleeding" in the state's shaky finances. Davis warned that the 2003-04 budget shortfall will soar beyond the staggering $21.1 billion projected earlier this month by the nonpartisan legislative analyst's office, and he said he is imposing a freeze on much state spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The formation of a new think tank on higher education in California was announced Tuesday, along with a $6-million grant from the James Irvine Foundation to fund the effort. The California Higher Education Policy Center, to be headquartered in San Jose, will study issues of access, price and quality of education in both public and private colleges and universities, according to Patrick Callan, executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flyer posted in the hallway at Cal State Northridge's Ventura campus tells the story. "Contrary to any rumors you may have heard, the Ventura campus will continue to remain open and growing for the fall 1992 semester despite the state budget crisis." Indeed, rumors ran rampant on the 1,200-student campus in recent weeks during preparation for final exams. There was even talk that the extension campus, hit by an 8.5% budget cut this year, might be shut down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2012 | Carla Rivera
Luis Aparicio wasn't sure he wanted to go back to school, but on Monday morning he was at West Los Angeles College, jostling with thousands of other students as they headed to math and history classes or searched for the cafeteria. It was the first day of the fall term at most of California's 112 community colleges, and statewide budget cuts meant students were returning from summer break to face higher fees, fewer course offerings and crowded classrooms. An information booth on the Culver City campus overflowed with students hoping to add high-demand classes such as English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's another sorry saga in Sacramento: Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature botching the governor's Plan A for healing the bleeding budget. Who's to blame? And what now? The first question is easy to answer: Blame everyone and everything. Blame the Democratic governor and, to a lesser extent, Democratic legislators. Blame short-sighted Republican lawmakers. Blame the labor unions that intimidate Democrats. Blame the hate-mongering radio entertainers and a Washington-based anti-tax demagogue (Grover Norquist)
NATIONAL
May 23, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Democratic state Atty. Gen. Andrew M. Cuomo announced his long-expected candidacy for New York governor Saturday, promising to fix the state's colossal budget crisis and reform its troubled political culture. Cuomo, making his second try for governor, outlined his plan to restructure the state's government and plug a deficit that is likely to balloon to $20 billion by January, when a new chief executive takes over in Albany. Incumbent Democratic Gov. David Paterson is not seeking to keep his job. "It's time for the people of the Empire State to strike back," Cuomo, 52, said at a rally Saturday in front of Manhattan's Tweed Hall, a former courthouse named for a crooked 19th century political boss who stole millions of dollars from New York City taxpayers.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
Facing a budget crunch that threatened to close schools early, lay off teachers and slash healthcare benefits, Oregon voters ended two decades of tax scrimping Tuesday by approving higher taxes on corporations and wealthy families. The two ballot measures passed handily in a referendum watched closely around the country as a signal of whether voters are ready to approve targeted tax hikes to bail out cash-starved state treasuries. Oregon voters since 1990 have limited property taxes, rejected sales taxes and vetoed across-the-board income taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2010 | By Michael Rothfeld
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Wednesday exhorted lawmakers to overhaul the funding system for state prisons and higher education, approve a jobs creation package and seek more money from Washington, even as he attacked the national healthcare plan. But his ideas received a mixed reaction, and it was unclear how much traction they might achieve in the face of the state's ongoing financial crisis. In his seventh and final State of the State address, the governor effectively offered a personal wish list for what he would hope to accomplish before leaving Sacramento at the end of the year.
OPINION
December 22, 2009
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is in the process of crafting a budget for the coming fiscal year that must close a nearly $21-billion gap between expected revenue and required spending, so a little lashing out is understandable. But he's seen enough disastrous budget years now to know how readily -- and wrongly -- many people blame the state's problem on illegal immigration. So it's a shame that the governor fueled just that sort of thinking in televised comments over the weekend. It's probably true, as Schwarzenegger said Sunday on "State of the Union" on CNN, that California pays "approximately a billion dollars for the incarceration of undocumented immigrants" and gets only $100 million in return.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of Measure J, the jail tax initiative on the May 14 ballot, say reports that state officials are considering raising taxes statewide to solve a looming budget crisis will help defeat plans to put a jail in Gypsum Canyon. "We'll see if people are willing to pay 7 or 8 or 9% in sales taxes before this is all over," said Rick Violett, chairman of Taxpayers for a Centralized Jail, one of the groups opposing Measure J.
OPINION
May 19, 1991 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe is a senior associate of the Center for Politics and Policy at Claremont Graduate School.
Early in his term as President, John F. Kennedy found his legislative goals stymied by congressional conservatives. "When I was a congressman," he complained, "I never realized how important Congress was. But now I do." Gov. Pete Wilson may be harboring similar thoughts about the state Legislature. Like Kennedy, Wilson is learning that the interplay of attitudes and ambitions--his own and those of legislators--will affect his ability to lead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2009 | By Carla Rivera
Demand for enrollment at the California State University system is expected to rise by 57,000 undergraduate students over the next five years, driven by larger numbers of eligible high school graduates and community college transfers, according to a state report released Wednesday. But the report, by the California Postsecondary Education Commission, warns that those students will encounter an almost insurmountable hurdle caused by the state budget crisis, as Cal State moves to slash enrollment by 40,000 students in the next two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2009 | Patrick McGreevy
Three years after Margaret Hamblin was busted for running a $50 betting pool on football at the Elks Lodge, the 76-year-old grandmother believes she got some justice Thursday when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a law reducing the penalty for participating in such office betting contests. The betting pool measure was one of 128 bills the governor signed Thursday as he cleared his desk of legislation that had been delayed as lawmakers grappled with the state's budget problems.
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