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State Budget Deadlock

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992
Let me see if I have this right: Gov. Wilson will risk the lives of the elderly, the disabled and children in order to make a political point with the Legislature over the budget crisis. I wonder, would he dare to be so cavalier if the people depending on oxygen treatment, home health care and emergency medical treatment were his own wife, parents or children? Have you no sense of shame? Have you no sense of decency? ARLINE WILLIAMS Hollywood
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Legislative leaders continued to work on the final details of a state budget agreement Thursday, after a Democratic proposal that closely resembled Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's spending plan was blocked by Republicans in the Legislature on Wednesday. They said no final deal is likely to be reached before next week, and lawmakers not involved in negotiations left the Capitol for their districts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1998
Two ritual signs in Sacramento this week point to movement toward resolution of the annual state budget deadlock: The Big Five is meeting and the temperature finally has gone over 100 degrees. The bad news is that the Big Five--Gov. Pete Wilson and the Democratic and GOP leaders of the Legislature--acts as if it has all the time in the world to pass a budget. It nibbles around the edges rather than attacking the core problem.
OPINION
October 16, 2004
Re "State's Voters Agreeable to New Tax -- on Millionaires," Oct. 12: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger says Proposition 63 and two other health initiatives have "good motives" but that such measures should not be considered "until California's fiscal health is fully restored." In other words, addressing the mental health of tens of thousands of undeniably neglected mentally ill should await the state's fiscal health, whatever the governor means by that. Ira Spiro Los Angeles Of course voters want the wealthy to be taxed!
OPINION
October 16, 2004
Re "State's Voters Agreeable to New Tax -- on Millionaires," Oct. 12: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger says Proposition 63 and two other health initiatives have "good motives" but that such measures should not be considered "until California's fiscal health is fully restored." In other words, addressing the mental health of tens of thousands of undeniably neglected mentally ill should await the state's fiscal health, whatever the governor means by that. Ira Spiro Los Angeles Of course voters want the wealthy to be taxed!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voicing deep frustration over the 42-day state budget deadlock, state Sen. Gary K. Hart says he's never been so depressed in his 18 years as a legislator. "I don't see any progress at all taking place--none," declared the discouraged Hart, whose district includes Woodland Hills. During a Senate debate on a budget compromise Sunday night and again in an interview Monday, Hart (D-Santa Barbara) complained about the lack of leadership, even from within his own party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Legislative leaders continued to work on the final details of a state budget agreement Thursday, after a Democratic proposal that closely resembled Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's spending plan was blocked by Republicans in the Legislature on Wednesday. They said no final deal is likely to be reached before next week, and lawmakers not involved in negotiations left the Capitol for their districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roslyn Howard is worried and scared. "The bills have been stacking up while I've been waiting for the state to send us money," she said Wednesday as she sat in her home here with her two developmentally disabled sons. Howard is, in effect, an employee of the state. She works for the minimum wage--$4.25 an hour--in a state program called In Home Supportive Services.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state began the new fiscal year today without a budget after Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders failed to resolve their differences Thursday in an all-day negotiating session that focused on taxes, welfare and prisons. Wilson and Democratic and Republican leaders of the Assembly and Senate met into the night in hopes of producing a spending plan and related legislation that could be put to a vote today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1998
Two ritual signs in Sacramento this week point to movement toward resolution of the annual state budget deadlock: The Big Five is meeting and the temperature finally has gone over 100 degrees. The bad news is that the Big Five--Gov. Pete Wilson and the Democratic and GOP leaders of the Legislature--acts as if it has all the time in the world to pass a budget. It nibbles around the edges rather than attacking the core problem.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state began the new fiscal year today without a budget after Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders failed to resolve their differences Thursday in an all-day negotiating session that focused on taxes, welfare and prisons. Wilson and Democratic and Republican leaders of the Assembly and Senate met into the night in hopes of producing a spending plan and related legislation that could be put to a vote today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992
The persistence of problems in state finance is evident in one situation over a century ago. Although the California Legislature had appropriated $25,000 for a state geological survey in 1860, the state treasurer, for lack of funds, was continually delinquent in paying the salaries and expenses of the survey team. Writing to his brother in November, 1861, team member William Brewer remarked that " . . . the actions of legislatures in such matters are very uncertain. . . . The present tardiness in paying us is most unfortunate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roslyn Howard is worried and scared. "The bills have been stacking up while I've been waiting for the state to send us money," she said Wednesday as she sat in her home here with her two developmentally disabled sons. Howard is, in effect, an employee of the state. She works for the minimum wage--$4.25 an hour--in a state program called In Home Supportive Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voicing deep frustration over the 42-day state budget deadlock, state Sen. Gary K. Hart says he's never been so depressed in his 18 years as a legislator. "I don't see any progress at all taking place--none," declared the discouraged Hart, whose district includes Woodland Hills. During a Senate debate on a budget compromise Sunday night and again in an interview Monday, Hart (D-Santa Barbara) complained about the lack of leadership, even from within his own party.
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