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NEWS
December 2, 2007 | Sean Yoong, Associated Press
He's been called the "Playboy Prince," famous for luxuries big and small -- planes, yachts, cars, even gold-plated toilet-roll holders. Brunei's disgraced Prince Jefri Bolkiah may have to adopt a more modest lifestyle now. A British court ordered him to surrender ownership of prestigious U.S. hotels and European homes to the Brunei government's investment arm as payback for allegedly helping himself to billions of dollars from state coffers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California has been flooded with revenue this tax season and is on track to finish the fiscal year with a surplus of billions of dollars, according to officials. State coffers contain about $4.5 billion more than expected in personal income tax payments. Nearly $2.8 billion of it arrived April 17, the third-highest single-day collection in California history, according to government figures. Business taxes have also rebounded and are likely to be $200 million ahead of projections.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Someday, this era may simply be known as The Google Years. California, whose budget revenue slides up and down like a yo-yo with changes in capital gains and stock options, is once again counting on outsized income tax filings from a handful of tech executives to help balance its budget. For this wave, California can largely thank Google Inc. After cashing in more than 9 million shares valued at $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2012 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
The future of California's public schools, universities and health programs could be linked partly to the fictional town of FarmVille. The popular virtual world is the creation of Zynga, a San Francisco online game company that raised $1 billion in an initial public stock offering last year. Because California receives much of its income from capital gains taxes, such moves by businesses like Zynga can mean hundreds of millions of dollars for state coffers. More California technology companies are poised to go public this year - including a widely expected $10-billion offering from Facebook - than at any time since the dot-com boom, experts say. Their success could relieve state officials of the need to cut state services more deeply in the budget year that begins in July, but Gov. Jerry Brown and his fellow Democrats are already squaring off over whether to count on the fruits of those transactions.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2003
How outrageous an idea that if you are stupid enough to get ripped off by a loan shark, you don't have to repay ("State Sues to Void 'Instant Loans' by Wells Fargo Unit," Jan. 10). I would fully agree that all interest should be deferred, maybe even the repayment going into the state coffers, but to forgive a loan fully is insulting to anyone smart enough to avoid that loan. Ben Boorman Compton
OPINION
December 23, 1990
It is official; I have received the notice that my SSI will be decreased as of Jan. 1. If the state of California had contented itself with merely keeping the SSI at the same level as it has been in 1990, that would have at least been honest. Yes, not having the money will be hard on me, but what really burns me up is the sneaky, underhanded way that our great state used to divert the benefit of the Social Security cost-of-living increase away from those people it was intended to help and into the state coffers.
OPINION
April 17, 2005
Re "Tribes Seek State Law Granting Tax Breaks to Expand Resorts," April 13: The key word in the article was "wealthy." Wealthy tribes want tax exemptions to build hotels, golf courses and other resort projects. These tribes have become just another group of wealthy special interest groups trying to siphon off money from state coffers. I voted for Indian tribe gambling, and I believe in it. But I don't believe the tribes' wealth should increase at the expense of the California taxpayers.
OPINION
April 28, 2004
Re "Most in State Expect Some Tax Increases," April 25: The Times Poll shows that a healthy majority of Californians are finally seeking fiscal sanity. For years now, the highly vocal tax-hating zealots in our midst have been very successful in convincing enough voters that any taxes paid to the government are just wasted. Over the years, one of the most successful tactics that these anti-tax zealots have employed is to tell taxpayers that they work just for the government four or five months a year because of the taxes they are forced to pay. The next time this tactic is used I suggest that, in rough figures, it should go something like this: Taxes paid in January and February go to pay the interest on the $2-trillion debt run up by President Reagan during his eight-year tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
California economists warned Thursday that the unexpected burst of revenue flowing into state coffers -- enough to wipe out a predicted $4-billion budget deficit -- appears to be a one-time shot in the arm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
It's familiar: A handful of Californians make a killing on investments, and their tax payments send state revenues soaring. Lawmakers go on a spending spree, without a plan for paying the bills when fortunes turn. That was the late 1990s, when the dot-com boom made the state flush but the gains proved fleeting, and California came perilously close to running out of cash. Now, as Gov.
OPINION
September 16, 2011
California lawmakers have attempted to give qualified undocumented immigrants access to state scholarships and grants for five consecutive years. Each time, however, a gubernatorial veto has cut short legislative efforts. Now, Gov. Jerry Brown has the opportunity to break with the past. He should do so by signing AB 131, part of a two-bill package known as the California Dream Act. The measure would allow illegal immigrants who graduate from a state high school and demonstrate both merit and need to apply for publicly funded scholarships and other state aid. A bill passed last month already allows these deserving students to apply for privately funded scholarships.
OPINION
February 3, 2010
Talk is cheap Re "Cellphone ban might not be making roads safer," Jan. 30 I read with interest your article about accident-rate research and the success of the new cellphone law in California. It is fairly obvious to me why the accident rate has not fallen since the law went into effect: Few people obey the law. As I drive about town, I still see many, many drivers ignoring the law by continuing to hold up their phones to their heads while juggling the steering wheel.
OPINION
June 7, 2009 | Brian O'Dea, Brian O'Dea, one of the biggest marijuana smugglers in U.S. history, is also a reformed addict and a former drug counselor. He is now a film and television producer and the author of the just-published "High: Confessions of an International Drug Smuggler."
When President Obama was asked in March whether he thought legalizing marijuana could help solve the nation's financial problems, his answer was unequivocal. "No, I don't think that is a good strategy to grow our economy," he said. But his response is unlikely to quell debate on an issue that polarizes Americans. Even academic studies that purport to be unbiased arrive at very different conclusions. Here are three viewpoints on why the country should or should not decriminalize the drug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld, Times Staff Writer
A court- appointed receiver vowed Thursday to raid California's depleted state treasury for billions of dollars as the state Senate's minority Republicans blocked -- for the second time in three days -- his plan to build prison medical beds. The developments threatened to severely worsen the state's fiscal crisis while setting up a showdown with federal judges who have declared the standard of healthcare in state prisons to be unconstitutional. The receiver, J.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | Sean Yoong, Associated Press
He's been called the "Playboy Prince," famous for luxuries big and small -- planes, yachts, cars, even gold-plated toilet-roll holders. Brunei's disgraced Prince Jefri Bolkiah may have to adopt a more modest lifestyle now. A British court ordered him to surrender ownership of prestigious U.S. hotels and European homes to the Brunei government's investment arm as payback for allegedly helping himself to billions of dollars from state coffers.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Someday, this era may simply be known as The Google Years. California, whose budget revenue slides up and down like a yo-yo with changes in capital gains and stock options, is once again counting on outsized income tax filings from a handful of tech executives to help balance its budget. For this wave, California can largely thank Google Inc. After cashing in more than 9 million shares valued at $3.
OPINION
February 3, 2010
Talk is cheap Re "Cellphone ban might not be making roads safer," Jan. 30 I read with interest your article about accident-rate research and the success of the new cellphone law in California. It is fairly obvious to me why the accident rate has not fallen since the law went into effect: Few people obey the law. As I drive about town, I still see many, many drivers ignoring the law by continuing to hold up their phones to their heads while juggling the steering wheel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1992
I am outraged that our welfare-oriented entitlement programs are threatening the state's ability to provide a proper and competitive educational program for our public schools. I wonder how many hard-working men and women are paying for other people's unemployment, welfare or worker's comp checks while themselves holding "low-paying menial jobs" waiting tables, towing cars, driving trucks, and so on? I wonder how much more these proud, hard-working taxpayers are going to allow to be deducted from their already small paychecks before they say enough!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2006 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
It's familiar: A handful of Californians make a killing on investments, and their tax payments send state revenues soaring. Lawmakers go on a spending spree, without a plan for paying the bills when fortunes turn. That was the late 1990s, when the dot-com boom made the state flush but the gains proved fleeting, and California came perilously close to running out of cash. Now, as Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Unions, school groups and advocates for the poor aren't the only ones clamoring for the extra cash that has state coffers overflowing for the first time in years -- California's biggest corporations are angling for the money too. Southwest Airlines, Intel, the Motion Picture Assn. of America and many others are busily canvassing the Capitol for state dollars in the form of tax breaks.
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