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May 22, 2002 | From Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- The State Department's e-mail identity was forged by a computer virus that sent itself to law enforcement and media outlets across the country, a department official said Tuesday. Variants of the virus, called Klez, have been spreading since the late 1990s and are transmitted through e-mails and attachments. The virus sent e-mails to hundreds of computer users Saturday with the return address of the State Department's public affairs office.
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NEWS
January 27, 2002 | BOB DROGIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Calling for a change in White House policy, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell has asked President Bush to ensure that international rules of war govern the treatment of 460 suspected Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters who have been captured in Afghanistan and are in U.S. custody, administration officials said Saturday. The State Department urged the president to give the 158 detainees at the U.S.
NEWS
January 12, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His father was an Austrian Jew who escaped the Nazi Holocaust by fleeing to Cuba. His mother was a Catholic Cuban who escaped Havana after Fidel Castro came to power. Their son, Otto Juan Reich, came to America at 14 with a personal and passionate distrust of dictatorships.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The white powder in an envelope sent to Deputy Secretary of State Richard L. Armitage was probably not anthrax, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said. "Preliminary results indicate that the substance does not contain anthrax," Boucher said. The State Department called in the FBI when an aide to Armitage opened the envelope Monday. The envelope was mailed in Kenedy, Texas, on Oct. 29.
NEWS
December 14, 2001 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Do you know a terrorist? . . . Now, do something about it. . . . You may be eligible for a reward." The State Department rolled out a public service advertising campaign Thursday aimed at getting Americans to be on the lookout for terrorists and turn suspects in when they spot them.
NEWS
November 30, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush's controversial choice of Cuban American activist Otto Reich to head the State Department's Western Hemisphere bureau is unlikely to clear the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a committee staff member said Thursday. The committee has told the White House that approval of the nomination is not expected and that lawmakers would prefer a different nominee, the staffer said.
NEWS
November 14, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department is searching its mail system for an undiscovered anthrax-laced letter after testing at an off-site mail room backed up health officials' theory that another such letter exists, a department spokesman said Tuesday. "We are now proceeding to look at all the mail that we have held up, frozen, sealed off, in mail rooms in this building, annexes and around the world," said spokesman Richard Boucher.
NEWS
October 27, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration designated the Taliban rulers of Afghanistan and six other governments the world's worst persecutors of religious believers Friday, but rejected calls to include other countries that the White House views as key in the war on terrorism. Human rights groups complained that Saudi Arabia, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan should have been added to the annual list released by the State Department.
NEWS
October 26, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS MEGAN GARVEY and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The circle of anthrax exposure widened significantly Thursday as health officials announced that one State Department mail worker has the inhaled form of the disease and a second employee has suspicious symptoms, even though neither man is known to have visited a contaminated postal facility or handled an anthrax-laced letter.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Refugee advocates and abortion rights groups are gearing up to fight the appointment of a veteran Vatican diplomat to head the State Department's refugee and population programs. The White House indicated last month that it was about to name John M. Klink as assistant secretary of State for population, refugees and migration. Klink, 51, is a member of the Vatican's United Nations mission and frequently represents the Holy See at international conferences.
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