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September 15, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - A prominent opposition activist was stripped of his seat in the lower house of the Russian parliament Friday, a move that heightens concern the Kremlin will continue its aggressive crackdown on political dissent. Gennady Gudkov, 52, a protest movement leader and member of the opposition Just Russia party, was expelled by a 294-151 vote of the State Duma, controlled by President Vladimir Putin's United Russia party. Gudkov, once an ally of Putin, called the action political vengeance by the Kremlin.
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WORLD
June 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- The lower house of Russia's parliament gave initial approval Tuesday to ban the adoption of Russian orphans by foreign same-sex married couples or by single persons from countries where same-sex marriages are allowed. Some lawmakers said the measure was intended as a response to a French law passed last month allowing same-sex marriage. The latest measure would not currently apply to Americans because they are already banned from adopting Russians. Lawmakers took that step in December in response to passage by the U.S. Congress of a law denying visas and imposing financial sanctions on Russian officials involved in the case of attorney Sergei Magnitsky, who died in prison in 2011 after shedding light on a multimillion-dollar scam.
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WORLD
November 15, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma, voted overwhelmingly to lengthen the presidential term from four years to six, an action that opponents called a step toward Prime Minister Vladimir Putin returning to the office. The constitutional amendment faces two more votes but appears certain to be enacted. Political analysts and Kremlin foes predict that President Dmitry Medvedev could step down as early as next year, making Putin the acting president and triggering elections in which Putin would run and probably win.
WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament took a first step Wednesday toward banning the adoption of Russian children by American parents, a move intended as retaliation for an anti-corruption law recently passed by Congress. The State Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted 399 to 17 in favor of a bill that included the ban and also would annul an adoption agreement between the two countries that Russia ratified in July. The measure still has to be approved by the upper house and signed by President Vladimir Putin, who has sent mixed signals about his support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2008 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
Boris Fyodorov, 50, a reformist financier who helped bring the Russian economy out of the post-Soviet chaos, has died, his company said in a statement. Russian television said he suffered a heart attack in London three weeks ago and died in a clinic there. Born in Moscow in 1958, Fyodorov was among the economists who fostered reforms in Russia before and after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. He also founded one of the country's largest investment banks, United Financial Group.
WORLD
May 8, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Dmitry Medvedev, a corporate lawyer tapped and groomed for the Kremlin by Vladimir V. Putin, was sworn in as president Wednesday under the watchful gaze of his mentor and predecessor. As soon as the ceremony was over, just as they had planned months ago, Medvedev nominated Putin for prime minister. With the two men apparently poised to rule in tandem, Russians were left waiting with a mix of anxiety and curiosity for hints of who's really in charge: 42-year-old Medvedev, who holds the highest job in the land, or Putin, the former KGB officer and wily politician who seems determined to keep a grip on power.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Communist was elected speaker of the Russian parliament at this year's first session Tuesday, a vote that came after about 100 opposition lawmakers walked out of the hall in protest. Gennady N. Seleznyov, who was chairman in the previous Duma, or lower house, was overwhelmingly reelected after a speech by acting President Vladimir V. Putin, who urged lawmakers to stop fighting with the presidency and start tackling the country's problems.
WORLD
June 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- The lower house of Russia's parliament gave initial approval Tuesday to ban the adoption of Russian orphans by foreign same-sex married couples or by single persons from countries where same-sex marriages are allowed. Some lawmakers said the measure was intended as a response to a French law passed last month allowing same-sex marriage. The latest measure would not currently apply to Americans because they are already banned from adopting Russians. Lawmakers took that step in December in response to passage by the U.S. Congress of a law denying visas and imposing financial sanctions on Russian officials involved in the case of attorney Sergei Magnitsky, who died in prison in 2011 after shedding light on a multimillion-dollar scam.
WORLD
June 27, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
RUSSIA * Russia's lower house of parliament passed a bill that would allow the sale of farmland for the first time since 1917 but would let foreigners lease, not buy it. The long-awaited reform is now almost certain to become law. Analysts said it will invite investment in one of the most backward sectors of the economy. The farmland in the world's largest country is estimated to be worth at least $80 trillion. Much of it is controlled by debt-laden collective farms.
WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament took a first step Wednesday toward banning the adoption of Russian children by American parents, a move intended as retaliation for an anti-corruption law recently passed by Congress. The State Duma, the lower house of parliament, voted 399 to 17 in favor of a bill that included the ban and also would annul an adoption agreement between the two countries that Russia ratified in July. The measure still has to be approved by the upper house and signed by President Vladimir Putin, who has sent mixed signals about his support.
WORLD
September 15, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - A prominent opposition activist was stripped of his seat in the lower house of the Russian parliament Friday, a move that heightens concern the Kremlin will continue its aggressive crackdown on political dissent. Gennady Gudkov, 52, a protest movement leader and member of the opposition Just Russia party, was expelled by a 294-151 vote of the State Duma, controlled by President Vladimir Putin's United Russia party. Gudkov, once an ally of Putin, called the action political vengeance by the Kremlin.
WORLD
July 14, 2012 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian lawmakers this week passed three measures to increase government control over the Internet, media and foreign-funded activist groups, despite widespread protests from Web professionals, journalists and human rights advocates. A bill that criminalizes libel and imposes fines of up to $153,400 on violators, and a measure that requires nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, that receive foreign funding to register as "foreign agents," were approved by the lower house of the parliament Friday, the last day of the legislative session.
WORLD
December 25, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
After just a few hours of debate, the lower house of Russia's parliament on Friday gave overwhelming preliminary approval to the New START nuclear arms treaty with the United States. The vote set the stage for the pact's likely easy approval in the new year. In a 350-58 vote, lawmakers in the State Duma approved the treaty on its first reading. Two more votes in the lower house, on the second and third readings, and balloting in the upper house were put off until January. However, experts said legislators of both houses are expected to fall in line with the Kremlin, which has given strong support to a treaty designed to sharply reduce the number of nuclear warheads and launchers in Russia and the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2008 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
Boris Fyodorov, 50, a reformist financier who helped bring the Russian economy out of the post-Soviet chaos, has died, his company said in a statement. Russian television said he suffered a heart attack in London three weeks ago and died in a clinic there. Born in Moscow in 1958, Fyodorov was among the economists who fostered reforms in Russia before and after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. He also founded one of the country's largest investment banks, United Financial Group.
WORLD
November 15, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma, voted overwhelmingly to lengthen the presidential term from four years to six, an action that opponents called a step toward Prime Minister Vladimir Putin returning to the office. The constitutional amendment faces two more votes but appears certain to be enacted. Political analysts and Kremlin foes predict that President Dmitry Medvedev could step down as early as next year, making Putin the acting president and triggering elections in which Putin would run and probably win.
WORLD
May 8, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Dmitry Medvedev, a corporate lawyer tapped and groomed for the Kremlin by Vladimir V. Putin, was sworn in as president Wednesday under the watchful gaze of his mentor and predecessor. As soon as the ceremony was over, just as they had planned months ago, Medvedev nominated Putin for prime minister. With the two men apparently poised to rule in tandem, Russians were left waiting with a mix of anxiety and curiosity for hints of who's really in charge: 42-year-old Medvedev, who holds the highest job in the land, or Putin, the former KGB officer and wily politician who seems determined to keep a grip on power.
WORLD
July 14, 2012 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian lawmakers this week passed three measures to increase government control over the Internet, media and foreign-funded activist groups, despite widespread protests from Web professionals, journalists and human rights advocates. A bill that criminalizes libel and imposes fines of up to $153,400 on violators, and a measure that requires nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, that receive foreign funding to register as "foreign agents," were approved by the lower house of the parliament Friday, the last day of the legislative session.
WORLD
December 25, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
After just a few hours of debate, the lower house of Russia's parliament on Friday gave overwhelming preliminary approval to the New START nuclear arms treaty with the United States. The vote set the stage for the pact's likely easy approval in the new year. In a 350-58 vote, lawmakers in the State Duma approved the treaty on its first reading. Two more votes in the lower house, on the second and third readings, and balloting in the upper house were put off until January. However, experts said legislators of both houses are expected to fall in line with the Kremlin, which has given strong support to a treaty designed to sharply reduce the number of nuclear warheads and launchers in Russia and the United States.
WORLD
June 27, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
RUSSIA * Russia's lower house of parliament passed a bill that would allow the sale of farmland for the first time since 1917 but would let foreigners lease, not buy it. The long-awaited reform is now almost certain to become law. Analysts said it will invite investment in one of the most backward sectors of the economy. The farmland in the world's largest country is estimated to be worth at least $80 trillion. Much of it is controlled by debt-laden collective farms.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Communist was elected speaker of the Russian parliament at this year's first session Tuesday, a vote that came after about 100 opposition lawmakers walked out of the hall in protest. Gennady N. Seleznyov, who was chairman in the previous Duma, or lower house, was overwhelmingly reelected after a speech by acting President Vladimir V. Putin, who urged lawmakers to stop fighting with the presidency and start tackling the country's problems.
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