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OPINION
December 8, 2001
Even though I'm an American only by naturalization, I'm proud to fly the Stars and Stripes from my flagpole at home. But since this great nation consists of entities called states and commonwealths, should we not also take pride in that? Every other day or so I fly a different state flag from my flagpole. It gets attention from neighbors. When I get asked by passers-by why I do so, I reply that Americans all over this great republic of ours should be honored by flying their state flag from time to time, as well as Old Glory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
Flags at the state Capitol in Sacramento are flying at half-staff Tuesday in memory of a Hawthorne police officer who died Monday after a freeway crash, according to Gov. Jerry Brown's press office. Sgt. Leonard Luna was off duty and riding his personal motorcycle to pick up his police motorcycle when the crash occurred at around 5:30 p.m. Monday on the 105 Freeway near Lynwood. Luna was a 10-year veteran of the department, where he commanded the traffic bureau. He held previous positions in private security.
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NATIONAL
April 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Georgia Legislature voted Friday to change the state flag to a version that echoes the Confederate battle emblem, but without the familiar Dixie cross that had led civil rights leaders to threaten an economic boycott. Lawmakers also agreed to quash any possibility of a referendum on reviving the Confederate battle emblem, which black lawmakers called a symbol of oppression. If the measure is signed by Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2005 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In the darkness a man kneels on the sidewalk, tending a small sea of candles. At 10 p.m. the man is alone with his work. The ministers have left. The crowd has retreated to wherever crowds go when TV and newspaper cameras leave. And now the candles need attention. Rodney Edwards lifts one small white candle from a row of votives and touches it to the wick of another whose flame has died.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sidestepping a decision on whether to eliminate the Confederate battle emblem from the state's official flag, Georgia state senators authorized a referendum on the issue. With the state polarized along black-white and urban-rural lines by the dispute, the lawmakers killed a compromise to designate two official flags. Instead, the senators voted 38 to 18 to let Georgians decide the fate of Gov. Zell Miller's proposal to drop the 13-starred rebel emblem from the state flag.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2003 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to skirt a racially charged debate over the Confederate flag symbol, Republican Gov. Sonny Perdue and Democrats agreed Friday to a proposed design for the Georgia flag that would eliminate the Dixie emblem. The compromise flag -- approved by a key legislative committee -- adopts elements of a lesser-known banner of the Confederate government and drops the familiar battlefield emblem, a blue cross of St. Andrew on a red field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Congress should pass a law prohibiting states from displaying the Confederate battle emblem on their flags ("Mississippi Votes to Keep Confederate Battle Cross on State's Flag," April 18). The Confederate flag is a symbol of slavery and secession and should not be glorified by a place on any state flag. JOSH RIVETZ Northridge
NEWS
August 4, 1989
Texas Gov. Bill Clements signed a bill establishing a new state flag desecration law to replace the one thrown out by the Supreme Court. The measure, similar to one pending in Congress, makes it a crime to desecrate the American flag and does not include language that the Supreme Court found objectionable when it ruled in June that flag burning was a protected form of free speech. The new Texas law also makes it a crime to desecrate the state flag.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
Treason has been on the mind of City Clerk Nina Banuelos ever since the city's treasured American flag was stolen from City Council chambers last month. "What kind of a person would steal a flag?" she asked. According to Banuelos, the 6-by-4-foot Stars and Stripes and its 10-foot pole were stolen from behind the mayor's chair between Aug. 9 and 11. "This could be considered treason, depending on who took it and what they did with it," Banuelos said.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | MIKE WARD
They aren't quite ready to burn the state flag yet, but city officials are flying the old grizzly banner at half-staff in Monrovia and upside-down in Pomona. The moves are in protest to proposals in Sacramento to take revenue from cities to shore up the faltering state budget. Monrovia City Manager Rod Gould said the symbolism involving the flag may seem frivolous, but it is a serious attempt to fight state budget proposals that could force cities to cut services or raise taxes.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2004 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
Elijah Coleman climbed out of the car in the dark, carrying a hammer, nails and poster displaying the rebel cross. Printed beneath the symbol of the Confederacy were two words: Sonny lied. As 18-wheelers rushed by, the 62-year-old used car salesman nailed his message to a highway sign -- as he has done hundreds of times in the last week during midnight rides across western Georgia.
OPINION
January 30, 2004
Re "Hunter Kills Cougar After Sheep Is Mauled," Jan. 28: It appears that cougar baiting is alive and well in Trabuco Canyon. Just what is the motive of these people who keep free-roaming and unnecessary livestock in what is known cougar country? Is it their wish for the extermination of this wild cat? Perhaps in the near future, when shopping centers, mega-auto dealerships, roads, freeways, subdivisions and apartment complexes completely surround Cleveland National Forest and the last cougar has been killed, we'll see fit to add an image of the cougar to go alongside the grizzly on the state flag.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2003 | Rennie Sloan, Times Staff Writer
It took months of political wrangling to produce Georgia's spanking-new state flag -- its third in two years -- but those efforts left George Mounger unimpressed. "It quite honestly doesn't amount to a hill of beans," said Mounger, who lives in suburban Atlanta and was stopping at a Wendy's restaurant in Cumming. Mounger was not alone. Many Georgians were greeting their new state flag with a battle-weary sigh, rather than a salute.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
A new state flag without the Confederate emblem was raised over the Capitol on Thursday after a redesign aimed at laying to rest a dispute that inflamed race relations and roiled Georgia politics. As the old flag came down, drivers slowed their cars to watch and there were scattered cheers and boos from a crowd on the Capitol lawn.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Georgia Legislature voted Friday to change the state flag to a version that echoes the Confederate battle emblem, but without the familiar Dixie cross that had led civil rights leaders to threaten an economic boycott. Lawmakers also agreed to quash any possibility of a referendum on reviving the Confederate battle emblem, which black lawmakers called a symbol of oppression. If the measure is signed by Gov.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2003 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to skirt a racially charged debate over the Confederate flag symbol, Republican Gov. Sonny Perdue and Democrats agreed Friday to a proposed design for the Georgia flag that would eliminate the Dixie emblem. The compromise flag -- approved by a key legislative committee -- adopts elements of a lesser-known banner of the Confederate government and drops the familiar battlefield emblem, a blue cross of St. Andrew on a red field.
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | Marla Cone
BARE OF BEARS: A century ago, grizzly bears were as common in Orange County as wild pigs and wolves--which is to say they were very common. . . . The last of the great shaggy bears to roam these parts was trapped and killed in 1908 at Holy Jim Canyon in the Santa Ana Mountains. . . . Ironically, the grizzly still graces the state flag, even though the California species is extinct. "California is the only state whose emblem is a stuffed museum piece," says local historian Jim Sleeper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1985 | Robert Hanley
After a year's absence, the state flag of California again whips in the breeze over the city's branch of the Orange County Library, which finally obtained a replacement for the flag stolen during the 1984 Olympic Games. In a brief ceremony Tuesday, state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) presented the library with the red-and-white state flag that, along with a U.S. flag, is now protected against theft by a padlock on the flagpole.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2003 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Georgia became the site of the latest battle over the Confederate-flag emblem Wednesday as Gov. Sonny Perdue proposed a statewide vote on whether to return the symbol to its former prominence on the state flag.
OPINION
December 8, 2001
Even though I'm an American only by naturalization, I'm proud to fly the Stars and Stripes from my flagpole at home. But since this great nation consists of entities called states and commonwealths, should we not also take pride in that? Every other day or so I fly a different state flag from my flagpole. It gets attention from neighbors. When I get asked by passers-by why I do so, I reply that Americans all over this great republic of ours should be honored by flying their state flag from time to time, as well as Old Glory.
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