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State James Baker

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
Secretary of State James Baker says there are still roadblocks to peace in the Mideast. I'm surprised; I thought we bombed out all the roads. HOWARD B. SCHIFFER Santa Barbara
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992
If it is true that Secretary of State James Baker said "that the Jews didn't vote for us" (March 7), shouldn't the Jewish people be applauded for their foresight? JOEY BISHOP, Newport Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992
If it is true that Secretary of State James Baker said "that the Jews didn't vote for us" (March 7), shouldn't the Jewish people be applauded for their foresight? JOEY BISHOP, Newport Beach
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | Richard B. Straus, Richard B. Straus is the editor of the Middle East Policy Survey
The Middle East peace conference in Madrid revealed what is possible when a fight ends with the victor unable to accept he has won, the vanquished unwilling to admit he has lost and the referee insistent on keeping the outcome to himself. Of course, it helps if the winners are the neurotically insecure Israelis, the losers are vainglorious Arabs and the ref is the ever wily U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991
In response to "New Mideast Arms Race Feared in War's Aftermath," March 18: The excellent article impelled me to present the following questions to President Bush, Secretary of State James Baker and Congress: 1. What is the rationale for equating regional stability with the aggressive pursuance of American arm sales to most countries in the Mideast? 2. Would a second Gulf War be more or less likely with incinerating missiles received from Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the United States?
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Secretary of State James Baker is to meet Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze in Vienna on March 7 for a get-acquainted session, the State Department said today. "There will be a preliminary get-acquainted meeting in Vienna on March 7. That will be followed later on by an in-depth meeting . . . outside of Vienna, at another time to be determined," State Department spokesman Charles Redman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991
Your editorial "Hoping Against Hope for the Breakthrough" (April 18) on Secretary of State James Baker's efforts to end the Arab-Israeli cold/hot war invites the comparison you make with President Carter's successful promotion of the Israeli-Egyptian rapprochement of 1977. But you fail to note the two salient differences between then and now: the then-President came to the peace table with clean hands, whereas the current President and his secretary of state had just promoted and waged a major war. President Carter showed his sincerity by his personal hands-on negotiating, while President Bush showed his insincerity (or remoteness)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1990
First, before we start to cry over spilled milk, I would like to say I think we should have waited to follow the U.N. lead and not gone into Saudi Arabia like charging elephants. Now that we are there, how to get out and not lose one American or Arab boy to this debacle is our problem. Let's say to the U.N., "What do you want us to do?" and do it. Nothing wimpy about that. I think the whole world would breathe a sigh of relief and the lives of thousands would be saved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989
I was stunned when I read, in the article "Congress Votes Contra Aid" (Part I, April 14), Secretary of State James Baker's comments to a Senate subcommittee. In these remarks he indicated little confidence that the Sandinistas will meet U.S. demands for democratic reforms. Baker claims that their record is abysmal and they have kept none of their promises. In all due respect, Baker is either the most uninformed secretary of state to ever hold an office of that stature, or he is hellbent on continuing the massive disinformation campaign of the Reagan era. How could Baker be unaware of the recent release of political prisoners in Nicaragua?
OPINION
February 10, 1991 | Martin Walker, Martin Walker is Washington bureau chief for the Guardian
The embattled leader sits in the bunker, surrounded by a small team of devoted aides who help him keep the world at bay, thinking about his enemies in the White House and fondly recalling the wonderful days before August when everything was going so well. No, not Saddam Hussein. These are grim times for Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
Secretary of State James Baker says there are still roadblocks to peace in the Mideast. I'm surprised; I thought we bombed out all the roads. HOWARD B. SCHIFFER Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991
Your editorial "Hoping Against Hope for the Breakthrough" (April 18) on Secretary of State James Baker's efforts to end the Arab-Israeli cold/hot war invites the comparison you make with President Carter's successful promotion of the Israeli-Egyptian rapprochement of 1977. But you fail to note the two salient differences between then and now: the then-President came to the peace table with clean hands, whereas the current President and his secretary of state had just promoted and waged a major war. President Carter showed his sincerity by his personal hands-on negotiating, while President Bush showed his insincerity (or remoteness)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991
In response to "New Mideast Arms Race Feared in War's Aftermath," March 18: The excellent article impelled me to present the following questions to President Bush, Secretary of State James Baker and Congress: 1. What is the rationale for equating regional stability with the aggressive pursuance of American arm sales to most countries in the Mideast? 2. Would a second Gulf War be more or less likely with incinerating missiles received from Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the United States?
OPINION
February 10, 1991 | Martin Walker, Martin Walker is Washington bureau chief for the Guardian
The embattled leader sits in the bunker, surrounded by a small team of devoted aides who help him keep the world at bay, thinking about his enemies in the White House and fondly recalling the wonderful days before August when everything was going so well. No, not Saddam Hussein. These are grim times for Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1990
First, before we start to cry over spilled milk, I would like to say I think we should have waited to follow the U.N. lead and not gone into Saudi Arabia like charging elephants. Now that we are there, how to get out and not lose one American or Arab boy to this debacle is our problem. Let's say to the U.N., "What do you want us to do?" and do it. Nothing wimpy about that. I think the whole world would breathe a sigh of relief and the lives of thousands would be saved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989
I was stunned when I read, in the article "Congress Votes Contra Aid" (Part I, April 14), Secretary of State James Baker's comments to a Senate subcommittee. In these remarks he indicated little confidence that the Sandinistas will meet U.S. demands for democratic reforms. Baker claims that their record is abysmal and they have kept none of their promises. In all due respect, Baker is either the most uninformed secretary of state to ever hold an office of that stature, or he is hellbent on continuing the massive disinformation campaign of the Reagan era. How could Baker be unaware of the recent release of political prisoners in Nicaragua?
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | Richard B. Straus, Richard B. Straus is the editor of the Middle East Policy Survey
The Middle East peace conference in Madrid revealed what is possible when a fight ends with the victor unable to accept he has won, the vanquished unwilling to admit he has lost and the referee insistent on keeping the outcome to himself. Of course, it helps if the winners are the neurotically insecure Israelis, the losers are vainglorious Arabs and the ref is the ever wily U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2001 | Matea Gold and Maggie Farley, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
In the worst terrorist attack ever against the United States, hijackers struck at the preeminent symbols of the nation's wealth and might Tuesday, flying airliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and killing or injuring thousands of people. As a horrified nation watched on television, the twin towers of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan collapsed into flaming rubble after two Boeing 767s rammed their upper stories. A third airliner, a Boeing 757, flattened one of the Pentagon's five sides.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Secretary of State James Baker is to meet Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze in Vienna on March 7 for a get-acquainted session, the State Department said today. "There will be a preliminary get-acquainted meeting in Vienna on March 7. That will be followed later on by an in-depth meeting . . . outside of Vienna, at another time to be determined," State Department spokesman Charles Redman said.
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