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State Kevin Shelley

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OPINION
October 1, 2004
Thanks to Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, California voters can ask for a paper ballot this November election if we want a paper trail for our votes. SB 1438, which requires electronic voting machines to produce a paper trail, won't go into effect until January 2005. Whew! Mary Jacobs Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2008 | Nancy Vogel
Julie Lee, who once raised campaign money for former Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, was sentenced Tuesday to one year and a day in prison for her July conviction on two counts of mail fraud and three counts of attempted witness tampering, according to U.S. Atty. McGregor W. Scott. Lee, 62, was indicted in May 2005 on charges of misusing $125,000 in state grant money that was intended to help build a San Francisco neighborhood center. Through intermediaries, she donated the money to Shelley's 2002 campaign for secretary of state.
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OPINION
December 25, 2004
Re "Audit Says Shelley Mishandled Vote Funds," Dec. 17: $46 million misappropriated, and Secretary of State Kevin Shelley says "we could have done a better job." What an understatement! The funds spent on his friends and colleagues "were certainly not intentional." Were they unintentional? Somebody meant it. Again, the people are the losers. This guy should be sent to prison or at least impeached. Barbara Trujillo La Mirada
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2005 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
With the threat of a subpoena looming, California Secretary of State Kevin Shelley agreed Thursday to testify voluntarily before a legislative committee examining what auditors concluded was Shelley's mismanagement of $46 million in federal election funds. Assemblywoman Nicole Parra (D-Hanford) was poised to seek a subpoena to compel the elections chief to testify before the Joint Legislative Audits Committee, which she heads. But five minutes before Parra's 10 a.m.
OPINION
October 10, 2004
Re "Misuse of Staff by State Official Alleged," Oct. 1: It's interesting to see the allegations about Secretary of State Kevin Shelley's use of state workers to perform campaign duties -- at a time when it takes his department about four weeks longer to process a notary public commission than his predecessors took. Whether or not the allegations are substantiated, Shelley's management fails to meet state needs. Arnie Goldstein Torrance
OPINION
May 6, 2004
Re "Some Counties Might Sue Over E-Voting Orders," May 4: Even though officials in some counties are fuming at California Secretary of State Kevin Shelley's decision to block electronic voting, I applaud him. Our democracy should not be entrusted to these fallible machines. I, for one, am going to vote by absentee ballot, and I encourage everyone else to do the same. Perhaps in our mission to "get out the vote" our new mantra should be "stay in and vote." If you want your vote counted, that is. Adair Seldon Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2008 | Nancy Vogel
Julie Lee, who once raised campaign money for former Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, was sentenced Tuesday to one year and a day in prison for her July conviction on two counts of mail fraud and three counts of attempted witness tampering, according to U.S. Atty. McGregor W. Scott. Lee, 62, was indicted in May 2005 on charges of misusing $125,000 in state grant money that was intended to help build a San Francisco neighborhood center. Through intermediaries, she donated the money to Shelley's 2002 campaign for secretary of state.
OPINION
November 29, 2003
Re "Reversal of Ballot Printout Plan Urged," Nov. 22: I am gratified to see that Secretary of State Kevin Shelley understands and acknowledges the widespread distrust of electronic voting systems by many voters and has been proactive in finding a solution. His new requirement that such systems have a verifiable paper ballot printout will do much to alleviate this distrust and return voters to the polls. I believe it is imperative, and not too much to ask, that we know our vote is being counted in the way we have intended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2003 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State Kevin Shelley on Monday called for an investigation by the state's Fair Political Practices Commission into nearly $1 million in hidden campaign donations from a Los Angeles insurance company to the California Republican Party and county GOP committees in the closing days of last year's election. Shelley, a Democrat, also said he will press to close what he called a loophole in campaign finance law that permitted 21st Century Insurance Group of Woodland Hills to cloak contributions it made to the state Republican Party on Oct. 21 until well after votes had been counted.
OPINION
July 25, 2003
While it upsets me that the engineers of California's recall attempt are systematically eroding our democratic system, it is the financial implication that really gets me. In the midst of a $38.2-billion budget shortfall, Secretary of State Kevin Shelley estimated the cost of the recall election at about $35 million -- an amount that the myriad slashed social services could desperately use. Instead, the money, which will come directly from California's taxpayers,...
OPINION
December 25, 2004
Re "Audit Says Shelley Mishandled Vote Funds," Dec. 17: $46 million misappropriated, and Secretary of State Kevin Shelley says "we could have done a better job." What an understatement! The funds spent on his friends and colleagues "were certainly not intentional." Were they unintentional? Somebody meant it. Again, the people are the losers. This guy should be sent to prison or at least impeached. Barbara Trujillo La Mirada
OPINION
October 10, 2004
Re "Misuse of Staff by State Official Alleged," Oct. 1: It's interesting to see the allegations about Secretary of State Kevin Shelley's use of state workers to perform campaign duties -- at a time when it takes his department about four weeks longer to process a notary public commission than his predecessors took. Whether or not the allegations are substantiated, Shelley's management fails to meet state needs. Arnie Goldstein Torrance
OPINION
October 1, 2004
Thanks to Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, California voters can ask for a paper ballot this November election if we want a paper trail for our votes. SB 1438, which requires electronic voting machines to produce a paper trail, won't go into effect until January 2005. Whew! Mary Jacobs Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2004 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
Employees of Secretary of State Kevin Shelley were routinely directed to pick up and process his personal political contributions as part of their state-paid jobs, according to sources familiar with the operation of his branch office here. Shelley is already the focus of state and federal investigations involving campaign contributions and the way he has administered contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2004 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
Federal authorities on Monday seized $308,000 from a nonprofit group whose director is under investigation for allegedly funneling illegal campaign contributions to Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, state officials reported. State Controller Steve Westly said the action was taken because the San Francisco Neighbors Resource Center failed to meet a Monday deadline to provide the state with proof that it properly spent a $492,000 grant Shelley had helped arrange when he was a state assemblyman.
OPINION
May 6, 2004
Re "Some Counties Might Sue Over E-Voting Orders," May 4: Even though officials in some counties are fuming at California Secretary of State Kevin Shelley's decision to block electronic voting, I applaud him. Our democracy should not be entrusted to these fallible machines. I, for one, am going to vote by absentee ballot, and I encourage everyone else to do the same. Perhaps in our mission to "get out the vote" our new mantra should be "stay in and vote." If you want your vote counted, that is. Adair Seldon Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2005 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
With the threat of a subpoena looming, California Secretary of State Kevin Shelley agreed Thursday to testify voluntarily before a legislative committee examining what auditors concluded was Shelley's mismanagement of $46 million in federal election funds. Assemblywoman Nicole Parra (D-Hanford) was poised to seek a subpoena to compel the elections chief to testify before the Joint Legislative Audits Committee, which she heads. But five minutes before Parra's 10 a.m.
OPINION
July 23, 2003
Re "Davis Seeks to Rally His Base," July 20: Our governor -- who says the recall is all about a woman's right to choose, public education, saving the coastline and not about a man -- is wrong again. It is about a man who raises funds for his own political use from every union and major corporate lobbyist and finds himself in great economic/political shape while mismanaging and nearly bankrupting the economy of our great state. Originally I opposed the recall, but now I support it. Gov. Gray Davis needs to go. Those who cry foul because of the recall can always take a shot at amending the California Constitution.
OPINION
November 29, 2003
Re "Reversal of Ballot Printout Plan Urged," Nov. 22: I am gratified to see that Secretary of State Kevin Shelley understands and acknowledges the widespread distrust of electronic voting systems by many voters and has been proactive in finding a solution. His new requirement that such systems have a verifiable paper ballot printout will do much to alleviate this distrust and return voters to the polls. I believe it is imperative, and not too much to ask, that we know our vote is being counted in the way we have intended.
OPINION
July 25, 2003
While it upsets me that the engineers of California's recall attempt are systematically eroding our democratic system, it is the financial implication that really gets me. In the midst of a $38.2-billion budget shortfall, Secretary of State Kevin Shelley estimated the cost of the recall election at about $35 million -- an amount that the myriad slashed social services could desperately use. Instead, the money, which will come directly from California's taxpayers,...
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