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State Lands Commission

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991
When is a deal not a deal? A deal is not a deal when the deal dramatically affects the lives of tens of thousands of people without their consent. The so-called "deal" mentioned in the editorial of Nov. 11 ("A Deal's a Deal in Bolsa Chica") concerning Bolsa Chica was arranged by three pro-developer factions (city of Huntington Beach, county of Orange, and Signal Landmark/Koll), an environmental group (Amigos de Bolsa Chica) and a neutral fifth party (State Lands Commission). Despite two requests, the homeowners of Huntington Beach were excluded from membership in the coalition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1997
An editorial in the Sept. 7 edition of The Times implied that the Surfrider Foundation, Ventura chapter, opposed the removal of the Oil Piers at the surf spot known by the same name. That is not true. In fact, in a letter dated Sept. 25, 1996, attorney Roger Lyon on behalf of the chapter wrote to the State Lands Commission. That letter stated, " . . . in conclusion, we support the removal of all or any portion of the Oil Piers complex." It should be noted that the issue was discussed by the Executive Committee of the chapter and the decision to support the removal of the piers is the official position of the chapter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
A snag involving the planned restoration of Batiquitos Lagoon has put the $15-million enhancement project in jeopardy and has blocked the massive Pacific Rim country club and housing development planned for the wetland's northern shore. The state Lands Commission has asked that Hunt Properties Inc., developer of the 1,000-acre resort, turn over ownership of its lagoon lands before restoration work begins.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The state Health Services Department has ordered its attorneys to find a way to build a controversial low-level nuclear waste dump in the Mojave Desert if a key state commission carries out its intention to block the construction. The fate of the proposed $40-million facility 24 miles west of Needles, in the Ward Valley, has been unresolved since June, when the State Lands Commission deliberately delayed action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1996
We strongly object to the unsubstantiated conclusion in your recent article on Bolsa Chica that Koll Real Estate Group is "giving up" on its approved Bolsa Chica plan. ("Koll to Offer Bolsa Chica for Sale to State," March 30.) This assertion is totally incorrect. The fact is that we remain committed to moving forward with the federal permit-approval process for the wetlands restoration and residential development on the lowland portion of the property. With the advent of the state's interest in acquiring the lowland, restoration of the degraded Bolsa Chica wetlands could occur through one of two ways: by implementing the Bolsa Chica plan approved by the County of Orange and California Coastal Commission (which includes a privately funded, 1,100-acre wetlands restoration in conjunction with construction of single-family homes on 185 acres of the lowland)
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | MARIA L. La GANGA and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
A controversial low-level nuclear waste dump in the Southern California desert cleared a major hurdle Thursday night, when Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan announced that he will proceed with the sale of 1,000 acres of federal land to the state of California for a site before the White House changes hands. Opponents of the dump said the action virtually assures that it will be built unless the courts intervene or the incoming Clinton Administration can reverse Lujan's decision.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
A Texas oil company's campaign to drill the first new wells in 40 years off the California coast continues despite setbacks in both the Legislature and at a key regulatory agency. The measure, which passed the state Senate but failed in the Assembly in August, would authorize drilling from an existing maritime platform in state waters off the northern Santa Barbara County coast. Supporters now hope for action this fall. Boosters of the project say state government stands to get an estimated $14 billion in potential new money to run schools, build prisons and strengthen a tattered social-welfare safety net. But opponents say they worry about the possibility of an oil spill that could threaten the California coast, an internationally renowned tourism magnet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2002 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California State Lands Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to recommend that a harbor-area city not include most of the land occupied by the Port of Los Angeles. Instead, the commission said the city of Los Angeles should keep control of port land under a trust agreement with the state. The property includes all of the underwater areas around the port and 67% of the dry land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles, in a legal settlement reached Friday, must repay the port $62 million that state officials alleged was improperly diverted to pay for municipal services and projects unrelated to the port. Ending its 1996 lawsuit against the city, the State Lands Commission unanimously approved the settlement after more than 18 months of negotiations between state and port attorneys. The Los Angeles City Council and Mayor Richard Riordan have already signed off on the terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1992 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial plan to allow oil drilling in Hermosa Beach cleared a major hurdle last week when the State Lands Commission found that the project meets the legal guidelines for coastal drilling. The commission, which must still review an environmental report on the project, will consider giving the plan final approval at a meeting scheduled for mid-August. Before the drilling plan becomes a reality, however, it must also win permits from a variety of other government agencies.
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