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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988
Manhattan Beach Mayor Bob Holmes did not violate any state laws by using the city letterhead for a newsletter in which he stated his opposition to a ballot initiative, according to City Atty. Carl Newton. Proponents of the measure, which would limit building height to a maximum of 26 feet and restrict commercial parking in residential zones, had asked for an investigation into whether Holmes had improperly used the city letterhead to express his views.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State authorities Thursday imposed $40,000 in fines against Sen. Tom Berryhill (R-Modesto) and two GOP committees after finding that the lawmaker laundered that amount of political money into his brother's 2008 Assembly campaign. The state Fair Political Practices Commission voted unanimously to uphold an administrative law judge's ruling that Berryhill committed a "serious and deliberate" violation of California's campaign finance laws. The commissioners decided in a 20-minute closed session to include in the fines the Stanislaus County and San Joaquin County Republican central committees for their role as conduits in passing $40,000 from Berryhill to his brother's successful campaign.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A Los Angeles appeals court said Thursday that Morgan Stanley's Discover Bank unit could require customers to arbitrate disputes, bypassing a California law that prohibits credit card contracts that bar some customer lawsuits. The 2nd District Court of Appeal ruling came in a nationwide class-action lawsuit on behalf of as many as 25 million customers who say they were charged late fees when they paid their bills on time.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Even as the United States continues its historic move toward fairness and equity for gay people, antiquated anti-sodomy laws remain on the books in a dozen states. Theoretically, these laws were rendered unenforceable by the Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence vs. Texas, but apparently not everyone has received that message. In the Lawrence case, the court declared that state laws banning consensual same-sex relations were unconstitutional. Yet somehow, between 2011 and 2014, 12 men were arrested in East Baton Rouge Parish in Louisiana under the state's remaining anti-sodomy laws.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN
Artists and art collectors alike should be interested in a relatively obscure California law that gives artists a percentage of the sometimes skyrocketing value of their original creations. The law (Section 986 of the California Civil Code) is simple and straightforward, with few loopholes or exceptions: If you resell a work of fine art in California for more than $1,000, you have to find the artist and pay him or her a 5% royalty.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN and LOUIS M. BROWN
Leases don't always mean what they say. That's because there might be a state law that supersedes what is said in a lease--or in any contract, for that matter. This basic legal principle is best illustrated in the landlord-tenant situation. By explaining it, we'll reveal a little-known legal secret. For many years, it was customary for a lease to provide for attorney fees when the landlord sued the tenant and won. It probably still is a common provision in some standard leases.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Philadelphia threw out a state law requiring Internet service providers to block Web sites containing child pornography, saying the tools to do so also caused "massive suppression" of constitutionally protected material. The 2002 law was aimed at forcing companies like America Online to block customers from viewing Web sites with sexually explicit images of children. U.S. District Judge Jan E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2004 | From Staff and Wire Reports
COUNTYWIDE The board of the Orange County Transportation Authority will expand to 18 members from 10 under a bill Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed into law Saturday. The board's new makeup will better represent Orange County's cities, said Assemblyman Lou Correa (D-Anaheim), who sponsored the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1996 | NICK GREEN
Gov. Pete Wilson has signed into law a bill that enables the Port of Hueneme to take a more active role in the two large transportation projects that would help the tiny harbor grow--the proposed Rice Avenue extension and a commercial airport at nearby Point Mugu. "This bill goes a long way toward leveling the playing field between Hueneme and other Pacific Rim ports," Oxnard Harbor District Commissioner Mike Plisky said.
SPORTS
January 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Running the Phoenix Grand Prix March 9-11 this year instead of in midsummer as last year makes the cars subject to a state law requiring that autos operated on Phoenix city streets use oxygenated fuels. Unless changed, that could halt the downtown race, but lawmakers are already moving toward a solution. The law requires the use of fuels containing 6.5% to 11% oxygen from Oct. 1 through March 31 annually. Formula One racing regulations bar more than 2% oxygen in its fuel.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court next week will consider for the first time whether states may enforce laws that make it a crime to knowingly publish false statements about political candidates. The justices will hear an antiabortion group's free-speech challenge to an Ohio law that was invoked in 2010 by then-Rep. Steve Driehaus, a Democrat. He had voted for President Obama's healthcare law and was facing a tough race for reelection. The antiabortion group Susan B. Anthony List launched a campaign to unseat Driehaus, preparing to run billboard ads saying, "Shame on Steve Driehaus!
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
California victims of alleged foreclosure abuses will get $268 million in relief from a $2.1-billion national settlement with Ocwen Financial Corp., the nation's largest non-bank provider of mortgage customer service. Ocwen broke state law by improperly denying loan modifications, failing to honor modifications granted by prior servicers and charging unauthorized fees, according to the California Department of Business Oversight. "Californians should not lose their homes because of deceptive and poorly executed mortgage servicing practices," Commissioner of Business Oversight Jan Lynn Owen said Monday in a news release.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker and Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer announced Wednesday she would not seek a third term, forgoing a campaign that would have required her to challenge the state's term limits measure. The Republican had left open the option of running this year, despite the overwhelming weight of legal opinion against it. She became governor in 2009 when Democrat Janet Napolitano left office to join President Obama's Cabinet, and Brewer won reelection the following year. The state limits governors to two terms, and most legal experts said her first partial term counted toward the limit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Almost as soon as Matthew Hoff turned 18 and aged out of the mental health programs he'd been enrolled in since childhood, he was out on the streets and in and out of jail. His parents tried to get him back into treatment for bipolar and other brain disorders he suffers, but the young man wasn't cooperative and he wasn't considered dangerous or gravely disabled. So they stood by helplessly as their son faded from their reach. Less than a year later, Hoff walked into a Buena Park bank with a robbery note and left with a handful of cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A panel of California appeals court judges found Friday that state law trumps Orange County's regulations on sex offenders that ban them from parks and beaches. The decision by the 4th District Court of Appeal reverses the conviction of Hugo Godinez, a registered sex offender who was convicted of a misdemeanor for violating the county ordinance after he went to a company picnic at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley in 2011. Godinez had been convicted of misdemeanor sexual battery in 2010.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
OPINION
January 23, 2000 | Jock O'Connell, Jock O'Connell, an international business consultant, was an analyst for the California Commission for Economic Development from 1983 to 1989
Sometime soon, members of the Legislature might want to ponder how many of the laws they enact this year could be overturned not by state or federal courts but by tribunals administered by foreigners, meeting in secret and rendering decisions that cannot be appealed. To many politicians, such challenges to state laws, not to mention local ordinances, are instinctively interpreted as an undesirable byproduct of the continuing efforts to liberalize global commerce.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | From Associated Press
California's law requiring candidates to identify themselves in mailings to voters is unconstitutional, a state appeals court ruled Friday. With apparent reluctance, the 4th District Court of Appeal said the law violates the historic right to speak and write anonymously. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1995 that an Ohio law requiring all campaign literature to contain the name and address of the person responsible violated freedom of speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By David Zahniser
A judge has dealt a serious setback to Los Angeles' efforts to bring larger development to parts of Hollywood, saying a new zoning plan is "fatally flawed" and should be rescinded by the City Council. In a 41-page tentative ruling issued this week, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Allan J. Goodman said city leaders failed to comply with the state's environmental law when they approved an update to the Hollywood Community Plan, which maps out rules for growth and development.
OPINION
November 21, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's disappointing that the Supreme Court denied a request to temporarily block an onerous new abortion law in Texas from taking effect while a federal appellate court determines whether the law is constitutional. The high court's decision could force as many as a third of the abortion clinics in Texas to close, creating a hardship for thousands of women seeking to terminate their pregnancies. The Supreme Court's decision was the wrong one. Now supporters of abortion rights must turn their attention back to the appellate court, which we hope will declare the underlying law unconstitutional.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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