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State Of The State

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2004 | Peter Nicholas, Joe Mathews and Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger spent much of the day Monday refining his first State of the State speech, a 20-minute address that will call for revamping California's troubled workers' compensation system and creating jobs as a recipe for reviving the economy, according to people who have seen the speech.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - So the state of the state's governor is static - at least until he is safely reelected. Until the election year blows over, Gov. Jerry Brown is stationary - in a crouch, protecting himself politically, satisfied with the status quo. In his 30th year in elective office - 12th as governor, after failing in three bids for the presidency and one for the U.S. Senate, and growing up watching his politician father - Brown is instinctively cautious...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unless Los Angeles-area viewers understood Mandarin Chinese or were willing to stay up past 2 a.m., they missed seeing Gov. Pete Wilson's State of the State address on television Wednesday. "It is the only statewide speech the governor makes each year and, gavel-to-gavel, no one took it in the second-largest television market in the second largest city in America," said James Lee, Wilson's deputy press secretary. "Naturally, we were disappointed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - With the state's finances in the black and a probable reelection bid to come, Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State address Wednesday is expected to hew to a familiar theme: Stay the course. As with the budget blueprint that Brown introduced recently, his address to a joint session of the Legislature is likely to highlight the state's improving financial health and his accomplishments of the last three years. "That's his reelection message: progress," predicted Bill Whalen, a fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution who was a speechwriter for former Republican Gov. Pete Wilson.
NEWS
January 5, 1994
Gov. Pete Wilson's State of the State address will be broadcast live at 5 tonight on KNBC-TV Channel 4 and on radio stations KABC-AM (790), KFI-AM (640) and KNX-AM (1070). KNBC-TV decided to televise the speech late Tuesday afternoon, after the deadline for a story in today's Calendar section reporting that no local TV station would be carrying the address.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's State of the State address will be broadcast live over at least three Los Angeles TV stations and one radio outlet at 5 p.m. today, but as of Tuesday afternoon, none of the three network owned-and-operated television stations were among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1993 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unlike a year ago, when no Los Angeles-area television station provided live coverage of Gov. Pete Wilson's State of the State address, KCAL-TV Channel 9 will preempt an "I Dream of Jeannie" rerun to show the embattled governor's only statewide speech of the year at 5 p.m. today. Radio stations KFI-AM (640), KABC-AM (790) and KNX-AM (1070) also plan live coverage of the 20- to 25-minute speech, in which Wilson is expected to emphasize his plans for economic growth and job development.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | DAN MORAIN and BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson used his fifth State of the State speech to cement his conservative remake Monday, replacing most moderate talk of years past with hard-line calls for tax cuts and pushing his views on welfare reform further than ever before. The Pete Wilson who spoke Monday made only passing mention of spending to care for children with emotional problems and on prenatal care for poor pregnant women.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | DAN MORAIN and BILL STALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson used his fifth State of the State speech to cement his conservative remake Monday, replacing most moderate talk of years past with hard-line calls for tax cuts and pushing his views on welfare reform further than ever before. The Pete Wilson who spoke Monday made only passing mention of spending to care for children with emotional problems and on prenatal care for poor pregnant women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1993 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a public relations offensive that is expected to last a month or more, Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday distributed a videotaped message urging Californians to "pull together" to turn around the state's economy one job at a time. Wilson, after a year in which he sought but failed to wrest control of the state Assembly from the Democrats, called for an end to "partisan finger-pointing" and "politics as usual."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown spoke only two sentences about streamlining environmental regulations in his State of the State address. But they inspired reformers to cheer. Could have fooled me. I was ready to pounce on him last week for scanty treatment, for kissing off the subject with only a brief reference, a throwaway line. But I'd have been wrong, say some experts, people who specialize in semantics and nuances. "The fact he mentioned it at all was a home run with the bases loaded," says Carl Guardino, president and CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a trade association.
OPINION
January 24, 2013
When a young Jerry Brown was elected governor of California nearly 40 years ago, he ushered in an era of both optimism and limits. His message to Californians was that they could have more, do more, be more - but only if they proceeded with wisdom and made smart choices. It fell to Brown and his constituents to nurture and build upon the promised land that the postwar generation had built: unparalleled networks of roadways, water delivery, higher education, parklands; new opportunities for the previously marginalized and neglected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2013 | By Anthony York and Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Seeking to reclaim the state's identity as an innovator and engine of growth, Gov. Jerry Brown declared in a sweeping State of the State address that "California did the impossible" in emerging from financial crisis poised to lead again. Brown outlined a vision for the state Thursday in remarks that were equal parts history lesson, lecture and rhetorical flourish. It includes major investment in water and rail systems, more robust trade and an education structure free of regulations that crush creativity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown will deliver a State of the State address Thursday morning that lays out an ambitious and optimistic policy agenda for a state he says is on the rebound. After persuading voters to erase much of California's budget deficit with billions of dollars in new taxes, Brown is free to shift his focus from patching holes in the government's finances to a longer-term vision. He is expected to expand on his plans for shaking up public universities, shoring up water systems and boosting the state's international trade.
OPINION
January 20, 2012
Fix the little things Re "Brown puts focus on big projects," Jan. 19 California has cities with transit systems that are underfunded, unreliable and little used; we have the Amtrak rail system that, in the words of author James Kunstler, "the Bulgarians would be ashamed of"; and we have cities that are essentially unwalkable and unbikeable because they were designed exclusively for the private automobile. The streets and roads we do have are falling apart and are jammed day and night because there are no viable alternatives to driving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Deviating sharply from education reform policies championed by President Obama, California Gov. Jerry Brown is calling for limits on standardized testing and reduced roles for federal and state government in local schools. Brown's positions, outlined in Wednesday's State of the State address, align closely with the state's two major teachers unions, but also embody Brown's independent streak. The governor's call for a reduction in standardized testing comes at a time when such tests are gaining influence across the nation, due in part to heavy federal support.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The two Democratic contenders for Gov. Pete Wilson's job in 1994 accused the Republican chief executive Wednesday of failing to provide California with the vision, leadership and broad scope of solutions needed to make the state safe and prosperous.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | GEORGE SKELTON
The main message Gov. Pete Wilson was trying to send Californians in his State of the State speech Wednesday was that he neither is a "nattering nabob of negativism" nor--in the opposite extreme--a George Bush. A nattering nabob of negativism, in this instance, is a governor who runs around bad-mouthing his own state, complaining that it is "a bad product."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
This is a first for Gov. Jerry Brown. And it puts California ahead of the game. It's the first time Brown has ever been governor during a presidential election year that he's not darting off across the country on a quixotic race for the White House. In fact, when Brown was governor the first time (1975-83), he was running for something in every election: twice for president, once for reelection and once for the U.S. Senate. He batted 1-for-4. During Brown II, he'll most likely jump into only one political race, for reelection in 2014.
OPINION
January 19, 2012
The gist of Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State address — that California is recovering — is hard to absorb, given the continuing high levels of unemployment, the year-to-year multibillion-dollar shortfalls in the state budget, the shuttering of state parks, the looming cuts to schools and the dismantling of human services programs. Yet the numbers, while hardly overwhelming, show that California has slowly, tentatively, turned a corner. What now? Brown lays out a plan that is controversial yet simple: Get the rest of the way over the hump with deeper cuts and with a temporary tax increase; shift more authority for incarceration and education from Sacramento to counties and school districts; fix coming budget problems, most notably public pensions, before they actually become problems; and keep the state on the cutting edge of environmental policy, transportation leadership and statewide opportunity.
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