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State Of The Union

NEWS
January 24, 1995
Foreign affairs will take a back seat to domestic issues and partisan politics when President Clinton delivers his second annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress today. Clinton will probably claim credit for restoring Haiti's democratically elected president to office, for halting North Korea's nuclear weapons program and for keeping U.S. troops out of Bosnia. He may also urge greater cooperation on international crime.
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NEWS
January 28, 1987 | United Press International
Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) called President Reagan's State of the Union message "excellent," and Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) said he was pleased that the President appeared to be in good health but added that his speech failed to touch crucial issues. "It was an excellent State of the Union message," Wilson said. "The President was both conciliatory to Congress and challenging. It was an ambitious speech with a broad pallet.
NEWS
January 24, 1996
Key topics touched on by President Clinton in his State of the Union address and by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas in the Republican response: CLINTON Education: "I challenge parents to be their children's first teachers. Turn off the TV. See that the homework gets done. Visit your children's classroom." Budget: "Our responsibility here begins with balancing the budget in a way that is fair to all Americans." Families: "We need a tax credit for working families with children. . . .
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | Associated Press
Following is the prepared text of President Reagan's farewell address to the nation Wednesday night: My fellow Americans, this is the 34th time I'll speak to you from the Oval Office, and the last. We have been together eight years now, and soon it will be time for me to go. But before I do, I wanted to share some thoughts, some of which I have been saving for a long time. It has been the honor of my life to be your President.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2004 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Congressional Democrats, responding to President Bush's State of the Union address Tuesday night, assailed the White House for leading the United States into a war against Iraq based on "unproven assertions" and pursuing a "go-it-alone foreign policy" that has left the U.S. with most of the casualties and cost of the military operation.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his State of the Union address tonight, President Clinton will propose achieving most of his social goals, including school construction and long-term care for the elderly, through targeted tax breaks rather than the traditional Democratic reliance on spending programs. Driving the strategy is Clinton's extraordinary predicament: delivering his State of the Union address even as his congressional adversaries seek to expel him from office over the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An increasingly worried White House appealed Thursday to every Cabinet department to whip up public support for next week's State of the Union address in a new effort to help pull President Bush from his political malaise. At a meeting Thursday, Chief of Staff Samuel K. Skinner called on top government officials to help create the maximum impact for the address, which Bush's chief speechwriter has called "the biggest speech of the next five years."
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nine decades, beginning with Woodrow Wilson, presidents have spent one evening early in the year presenting their annual legislative agenda by delivering a formal State of the Union address to Congress. But in 1998, stung by criticism that he had already become a lame duck in the first year of his second term, Bill Clinton decided to stretch the traditional State of the Union address into a month's worth of major announcements. On Sunday it was Social Security reform.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2006 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
Recognizing individual accomplishments in a State of the Union address is a modern presidential tradition. Usually, the honorees are human. On Tuesday night, however, among the 24 presidential guests invited to the ornate House gallery was Rex, a bomb-sniffing German shepherd who occupied a prime aisle seat alongside his handler, Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jamie Dana. Both were injured -- Dana severely, Rex slightly -- in Iraq last June when a bomb exploded under their vehicle.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Their fingers crossed in hope, those who covet George Bush's job offered a thumbs-down assessment Tuesday night of the President's State of the Union address. Reams of rhetoric boiled down to this: From Bush, it was too little, too late, they said. "His State of the Union could only have come from a person who is totally out of touch with America," harrumphed Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin, echoing the sentiments of the four other major Democrats seeking the presidency.
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