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State Of The Union

NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Saying it's the "defining project of our generation," President Obama will call on Americans on Tuesday night to try to bridge the gap between rich and poor in a State of the Union speech that will focus on restoring the promise of upward mobility and economic opportunity.  "Today, after four years of economic growth, corporate profits and stock prices have rarely been higher, and those at the top have never done better.  But average...
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NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Republicans took multiple tries to deliver their reaction to President Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday night. In addition to the officially sanctioned Republican Party response by Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and a Spanish-language version by Florida Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the Tea Party Express faction continued its practice of delivering a separate speech, this year by Sen. Mike Lee of Utah. And Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, who had delivered the Tea Party Express response last year, staked out his own turf this year with a YouTube address.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Evan Halper
In his State of the Union address, President Obama unveiled policies he can implement by executive order, as well as several needing congressional approval. Among them: Executive actions: • Create a retirement savings program for lower-income workers. The “starter” investment plan would be made available to millions of private-sector employees who do not currently have access to a 401(k) or pension. • Boost the minimum wage for workers hired by firms with federal contracts to $10.10 per hour.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
President Obama will stand before members of Congress and a national television audience tonight to deliver his sixth annual State of the Union address. It's pretty safe to assume it will include the following: Paeans to the American dream, from the particular vantage of the middle class. Support for energy independence, education and changes in immigration laws. A short nod to international affairs, the winding down of wars abroad and the continued pursuit of terrorists. A laundry list of desires that the president knows will probably never see the light of day, even if all sides genuflect to the everyday Americans arrayed in the House chamber as witnesses, a theatrical touch of guilt-mongering employed since the era of President Reagan.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee and Evan Halper
WASHINGTON -- President Obama's discussion of energy and environmental issues in his State of the Union address was notable not just for what he said, but for what he didn't say. The president largely stuck to issues he had discussed before, such as how a good portion of the country's economic recovery, including the limited revival of manufacturing jobs, stems from the domestic fossil fuel boom, especially in natural gas. But he remained silent...
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Republicans accused of waging a "war on women" attempted to send a message to the nation with the selection of Washington state Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the top woman in GOP leadership and a mother of three, to deliver the party's response Tuesday night to President Obama's State of the Union address. The House GOP, though, will send another message just hours before the president visits the House chamber -- voting on a bill called the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortions Act, which seeks to expand a prohibition on the use of federal dollars to pay for abortions.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON - President Obama's sixth speech on the state of the union will spotlight many issues, but more than anything may illuminate the vast gap between his policy ambitions and the tools he has to achieve them. The president made the ambition clear last month, when he referred to a “dangerous and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility” in the United States  as the “the defining challenge of our time.” His overriding goal, he has said in speeches and interviews, is to reverse the trend in which incomes for most Americans have stagnated since the late 1970s while the share going to the wealthiest has soared.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- President Obama urged Congress in his State of the Union speech to “fix our broken immigration system,” saying both political parties stood to gain by helping millions of undocumented immigrants get a legal foothold in America. “Independent economists say immigration reform will grow our economy and shrink our deficits by almost $1 trillion in the next two decades,” he said. “And for good reason: When people come here to fulfill their dreams - to study, invent and contribute to our culture - they make our country a more attractive place for businesses to locate and create jobs for everyone.” But Obama, aware that House Republicans won't appreciate any hectoring from him, didn't set out any legislative markers, including requiring a pathway to legal status and ultimately citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the country illegally.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Hoping to leave a bruising year in the rearview mirror, President Obama vowed Tuesday to work with Congress when possible but around it when necessary to push ahead with a series of mostly modest steps aimed at helping low- and middle-income families share in the economic recovery. In his State of the Union address, Obama shook off his earlier recession-era rhetoric to envision an increasingly robust economy. He warned Congress not to impede that progress, and swore he would work to shrink the gap between rich and poor left by the years of job losses and depressed wages.
OPINION
January 28, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The rap against President Obama's State of the Union address on Tuesday was that his agenda, once ambitious and transformational, has suddenly turned modest. Instead of grand bargains and sweeping change, the president proposed holding a summit meeting on working families and extracting a promise from colleges to admit more low-income students - not exactly sweeping solutions to middle-class stagnation and college debt. What happened to the visionary politician who promised that his inauguration would mark the moment the rise of the oceans began to slow?
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