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NEWS
July 3, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If your travel plans include a stop at this stretch of San Diego County coast any time soon, watch your step. Rusty nails protrude from the shoreline stairs, and the rickety handrail has snapped in two. Visiting the bathrooms can be perilous too. The toilets--installed about 1965--leak, coating the floors with goo. As for that old state park staple--the evening campfire program--make no promises to the kids.
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NEWS
July 3, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If your travel plans include a stop at this stretch of San Diego County coast any time soon, watch your step. Rusty nails protrude from the shoreline stairs, and the rickety handrail has snapped in two. Visiting the bathrooms can be perilous too. The toilets--installed about 1965--leak, coating the floors with goo. As for that old state park staple--the evening campfire program--make no promises to the kids.
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NEWS
April 19, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The saying "You can't get there from here" may not be far from the truth for Picacho--one of the most inaccessible places in the state park system. Picacho (pronounced Pea-kah-show) is in the southeast corner of California, on the west bank of the Colorado River, 25 miles north of the Imperial County town of Winterhaven. But 18 miles of the drive is along a miserable, winding, one-lane dirt road that meanders through the hills, narrow gorges and valleys of the Chocolate Mountains.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's vast park system, once considered one of the finest in the world, is "falling apart" as drastic fee increases have driven away users and years of neglect have forced it to forgo essential maintenance, a blue-ribbon committee finds in a new report. As summer begins, a financial crisis in the system raises the possibility that many parks could close--some as early as July 1, the height of the visitor season--and others could be forced to operate at reduced hours.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's vast park system, once considered one of the finest in the world, is "falling apart" as drastic fee increases have driven away users and years of neglect have forced it to forgo essential maintenance, a blue-ribbon committee finds in a new report. As summer begins, a financial crisis in the system raises the possibility that many parks could close--some as early as July 1, the height of the visitor season--and others could be forced to operate at reduced hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1994 | IRA E. STOLL
Four governmental agencies will help decide what to do with the crumbling oceanside bicycle path near Seaside Park in Ventura, Assistant City Manager Steve Chase said this week. The path has been eaten away by the ocean and tangled in jurisdictional disputes among the city, state parks, California Coastal Commission and the County Fair Board.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Tests done by federal health officials have confirmed that a wildlife biologist at Grand Canyon National Park died of the plague. Eric York, 37, died Nov. 2 in his home at the Grand Canyon. He had done a necropsy on a mountain lion a few days earlier, and tests on the big cat show it too had died of the plague. After suspecting plague in York's death, National Park Service officials began precautionary antibiotic treatment of nearly 50 people. None became ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2003 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
With neither the state nor Los Angeles County stepping forward to pay operating costs, parks officials are reluctantly facing the reality that the popular Castaic Lake State Recreation Area may close indefinitely on Aug. 31 -- the day before the crowded Labor Day holiday.
TRAVEL
April 6, 2003 | John McKinney, Special to The Times
Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park, 6,000 acres of volcanic beauty in Shasta County, may be the most obscure of about 270 state parks in California. That's because of its remote location in the Fall River Valley, about 200 miles north of Sacramento and 65 miles northeast of Redding. Visitors cannot drive to the park; they must rent canoes or kayaks in a nearby town or bring their own boat, then cross an inlet. Fewer than 2,000 people make the trip each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- State finance officials caught accounting discrepancies at the California parks department as far back as 1999, but the issue was not resolved until it mushroomed into an embarrassing scandal last year, according to a new audit released Thursday.  The audit  also described other loose practices at state parks: Parks and Recreation Department officials haven't tracked costs and spending for individual parks, and base operating estimates...
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The saying "You can't get there from here" may not be far from the truth for Picacho--one of the most inaccessible places in the state park system. Picacho (pronounced Pea-kah-show) is in the southeast corner of California, on the west bank of the Colorado River, 25 miles north of the Imperial County town of Winterhaven. But 18 miles of the drive is along a miserable, winding, one-lane dirt road that meanders through the hills, narrow gorges and valleys of the Chocolate Mountains.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1997 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This Independence Day weekend, the Autry Museum of Western Heritage will screen a patriotic movie, complete with soaring anthems on the soundtrack and shots of flags waving proudly. Kids should see it. It's educational, and even has plenty of shoot-em-up stuff--as you'd expect in an American historical epic. And there will be a discussion of the movie at Saturday's screening, led by Dr. Doyce B. Nunis, professor emeritus of history at the University of Southern California.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore stood at the base of the Santa Monica Mountains on Sunday and pledged that, as president, he would spend $2 billion over the next 10 years to create new parklands and preserve open spaces. Promising to "put protection of the environment at the center of my presidency," Gore proposed offering $1 billion in tax cuts to landowners who transfer private land to conservation, and an additional $1 billion to cities and states to create local parks.
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