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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
State schools Supt. Bill Honig today delivered a negative report card for Channel 1, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduced commercials into the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for the time that students spent watching the commercial television. Whittle Communications had introduced a pilot program into five schools nationwide, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
I'm still incredulous over your support of Delaine Eastin for state superintendent of public instruction, especially after you acknowledged one of her major flaws--her obligations to the California Teachers Assn.! You have high praise for Maureen DiMarco, yet you did not recommend her. I strongly request that the editorial board reconsider its endorsement. DiMarco has been an advocate for students and quality education long before her public service began. Ten years ago she started working at the state level first as the special consultant to the California Department of Education, then as executive consultant to the superintendent of public schools, and finally as the governor's cabinet secretary for child development and education.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1989
With the continuing decline in the educational achievement levels of America's young students, the recent article about the extraordinary performance of South Bay Union Elementary School District came as a pleasant surprise ("No Easy A's in Top South Bay Schools," Nov. 26). With a student population of 68% nonwhite and 57% working poor, the superintendent and his staff observe that their students acquire basic skills in reading and math similar to districts servicing the economically advantaged.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Significantly higher numbers of California high school seniors are passing the demanding Advanced Placement examinations for college credits, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Wednesday. In addition, more than 31% of the state's public high school seniors--up from 25.4% in 1985--are completing the series of courses required for admission to the University of California system. "More of California students from all backgrounds are performing at higher levels than ever before. . .
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The state Senate on Monday approved legislation to provide an additional $50 million to continue English and civics classes for those seeking citizenship under the 1986 amnesty program. A 32-4 vote sent the bill by Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) to the Assembly for further consideration. One of the requirements imposed on the amnesty program by Congress is that those people seeking citizenship successfully complete a minimum of 40 hours of instruction in English and civics.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN Times staff writer
State schools Supt. Bill Honig issued a negative report card last week to Channel One, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduces commercials to the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for time that students spend watching the program. In March, Tennessee-based Whittle Communications introduced Channel One's pilot project in five high schools and one junior high throughout the nation, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
State schools Supt. Bill Honig issued a negative report card Thursday for Channel One, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduces commercials to the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for the time that students spend watching the program. In March, Tennessee-based Whittle Communications introduced Channel One's pilot project in five high schools and one junior high across the nation, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
I'm still incredulous over your support of Delaine Eastin for state superintendent of public instruction, especially after you acknowledged one of her major flaws--her obligations to the California Teachers Assn.! You have high praise for Maureen DiMarco, yet you did not recommend her. I strongly request that the editorial board reconsider its endorsement. DiMarco has been an advocate for students and quality education long before her public service began. Ten years ago she started working at the state level first as the special consultant to the California Department of Education, then as executive consultant to the superintendent of public schools, and finally as the governor's cabinet secretary for child development and education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Student protesters called off demonstrations at two South Bay high schools Thursday after they said school board members told them the board is committed to investigating claims of racism in the district. Meanwhile, State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig announced that he will send a representative to the Centinela Valley Union High School District today at the request of Supt. McKinley Nash to look into allegations of racism made by students, teachers and administrators.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Significantly higher numbers of California high school seniors are passing the demanding Advanced Placement examinations for college credits, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Wednesday. In addition, more than 31% of the state's public high school seniors--up from 25.4% in 1985--are completing the series of courses required for admission to the University of California system. "More of California students from all backgrounds are performing at higher levels than ever before. . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Student protesters called off demonstrations at two South Bay high schools Thursday after they said school board members told them the board is committed to investigating claims of racism in the district. Meanwhile, State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig announced that he will send a representative to the Centinela Valley Union High School District today at the request of Supt. McKinley Nash to look into allegations of racism made by students, teachers and administrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1989
With the continuing decline in the educational achievement levels of America's young students, the recent article about the extraordinary performance of South Bay Union Elementary School District came as a pleasant surprise ("No Easy A's in Top South Bay Schools," Nov. 26). With a student population of 68% nonwhite and 57% working poor, the superintendent and his staff observe that their students acquire basic skills in reading and math similar to districts servicing the economically advantaged.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN Times staff writer
State schools Supt. Bill Honig issued a negative report card last week to Channel One, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduces commercials to the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for time that students spend watching the program. In March, Tennessee-based Whittle Communications introduced Channel One's pilot project in five high schools and one junior high throughout the nation, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
State schools Supt. Bill Honig issued a negative report card Thursday for Channel One, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduces commercials to the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for the time that students spend watching the program. In March, Tennessee-based Whittle Communications introduced Channel One's pilot project in five high schools and one junior high across the nation, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
State schools Supt. Bill Honig today delivered a negative report card for Channel 1, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduced commercials into the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for the time that students spent watching the commercial television. Whittle Communications had introduced a pilot program into five schools nationwide, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The state Senate on Monday approved legislation to provide an additional $50 million to continue English and civics classes for those seeking citizenship under the 1986 amnesty program. A 32-4 vote sent the bill by Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) to the Assembly for further consideration. One of the requirements imposed on the amnesty program by Congress is that those people seeking citizenship successfully complete a minimum of 40 hours of instruction in English and civics.
NEWS
January 8, 1987
Venice High School has received a 1986 California School Recognition Program Award for ranking in the top 5% of schools with seniors completing three or more years of foreign language courses. The award from the California Department of Education was presented to schools scoring highly in the second year of state schools Supt. Bill Honig's educational reform program.
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