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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel and Adolfo Flores
The Orange County district attorney's office will ask the state Supreme Court to review the recent decisions of an appellate court that found that state law trumps local regulations banning sex offenders from parks and beaches. In 2011 and 2012, Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas and his staff successfully lobbied the county and more than a dozen cities to adopt the restrictions against sex offenders. But the rules, which required sex offenders to obtain written permission from a law enforcement official in order to be exempted, soon faced legal challenges and local law enforcement stopped enforcing them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court appeared to be headed toward a ruling Tuesday in favor of requiring police agencies to make public the names of officers involved in shootings. During a hearing, members of the state high court suggested that the California Public Records Act favors disclosure and questioned how police could justify secrecy when officers shoot people on the job. The court is considering a case in which the city of Long Beach and the Long Beach Police Officers Assn.
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NEWS
December 5, 1995
The state Supreme Court upheld the death sentence Monday of a Stanislaus County man for allegedly planning a drug-related revenge murder in which the killer was paid with a small amount of drugs. Alfredo Alvarado Padilla "is not the most heinous murderer nor is his crime the most abominable," the court said, noting Padilla's limited, and hotly disputed, role in the murder plot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel and Adolfo Flores
The Orange County district attorney's office will ask the state Supreme Court to review the recent decisions of an appellate court that found that state law trumps local regulations banning sex offenders from parks and beaches. In 2011 and 2012, Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas and his staff successfully lobbied the county and more than a dozen cities to adopt the restrictions against sex offenders. But the rules, which required sex offenders to obtain written permission from a law enforcement official in order to be exempted, soon faced legal challenges and local law enforcement stopped enforcing them.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | Associated Press
The state Supreme Court refused Tuesday to block Horace Kelly's execution next week or to review a jury's conclusion that he is sane enough to be put to death for three Southern California murders. By a 5-2 vote, without comment, the court denied a hearing on claims by Kelly's lawyer of numerous legal errors and irregularities in the sanity trial, the first proceeding in a California court since 1950 to consider whether a prisoner was too insane to be executed.
NATIONAL
October 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Georgia Supreme Court unanimously struck down the state's hate crimes law, saying the measure was so broadly worded that it could be used to prosecute a rabid sports fan for picking on somebody wearing a rival team's cap. The 7-0 ruling came in the case of a white man and a white woman who were convicted of beating two black men in Atlanta.
NEWS
June 20, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In another legal win for financially ailing California, the state Supreme Court has turned down a challenge to $2.8 billion in taxes imposed on domestic-based multinational firms. The justices unanimously refused to hear an appeal by the Colgate-Palmolive Co. and other multinational firms of a lower court ruling upholding the state's unitary tax--a since-revised method of taxing a share of firms' worldwide income.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The California Supreme Court has decided not to transfer to a lower court the suit by Rep. Daniel E. Lungren over his confirmation as state treasurer but will not decide for several weeks whether to dismiss the case, a court spokeswoman said Tuesday. The Long Beach Republican has sued state officials, claiming that he is entitled to be sworn in as treasurer because the state Assembly approved his nomination last month.
OPINION
April 28, 1996 | Charles L. Lindner, Charles L. Lindner is former president of the Los Angeles County Criminal Bar Assn
Sometimes, government "checks and balances" fail. The impending confirmation of state Supreme Court nominee Janice Rogers Brown may be one of those times. According to a news report in The Times, Gov. Pete Wilson misrepresented an evaluation of Brown by the Commission on Judicial Nominees Evaluation when he said the commission's sole objection to his nominee was her "insufficient judicial experience."
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court has dismissed a case testing the validity of a libel suit brought by leaders of a defunct psychological therapy program against a prominent UCLA professor who called the controversial group a cult. The justices cleared the way for trial of a suit against Dr. Louis J.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A Kansas man was smacked in the eye by a hot dog at a Royals baseball game, and his lawsuit has gone all the way to the state Supreme Court. Good thing it wasn't a baseball -- for more than the obvious reasons.  If it's a foul ball or a broken bat, the "baseball rule" dictates that the team is protected from having to pay out, as the Associated Press explains. The fan is assuming that risk when he enters the stadium.  The waiver of liability...
OPINION
August 16, 2013
Re "Justices deal new setback to Prop. 8," Aug. 15 It is amusing how the proponents of Proposition 8 will not follow court rulings and argue that the state and the courts have silenced the voices of millions of voters. A federal District Court judge said that Proposition 8 violated the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution; the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said it took away a right from a minority group for no good reason, making it unconstitutional. In 1964, Proposition 14 was passed in California with the objective of keeping African Americans out of certain white neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court once again is delving into the heated battle over gay marriage as it considers a request filed Friday by the backers of Proposition 8 to stop same-sex weddings. ProtectMarriage, the sponsors of the 2008 ballot measure, asked the state high court to stop the weddings immediately on the grounds that Gov. Jerry Brown lacked the authority to order county clerks to issue same-sex marriage licenses. In a 50-page petition, ProtectMarriage contended that Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker's 2010 federal injunction against Proposition 8 did not apply statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that digital mapping files known as geographic information systems must be released under the state's public records law. The decision could make it easier for media organizations, advocacy groups and others to obtain government GIS databases, rich collections of data that can be used to display and analyze multiple layers of geographical information. The case stems from a 2007 letter the Sierra Club wrote to the Orange County assessor requesting copies of its OC Landbase, a GIS database of information on more than 640,000 land parcels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By Joe Eckdahl
Richard Ramirez - the infamous serial killer who died Friday - was named the "Night Stalker" during an editorial "rump session" at the now defunct Los Angeles Herald Examiner. The informal gathering occurred after authorities revealed the string of killings were tied to a single suspect. Many names were bandied about at the meeting - among them "The Walk-in Killer" and "The Screen-Door Intruder," each referencing the ease with which the killer accessed the victims' homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - A new California judicial ethics committee has issued its first formal opinion, deciding that judges may solicit attorneys to lobby for funding for the courts. The Committee on Judicial Ethics Opinions, responding to a request from an undisclosed person, said Friday that judges may ask lawyers to write op-ed pieces and lobby the community and the Legislature about court budget cuts as long as the request is not coercive. "In presenting information and requesting assistance, a judge may not hint of retribution or bias against an attorney or firm for not acquiescing in the request or otherwise place pressure on an attorney to assist," the written opinion said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
The California Supreme Court upheld state sentencing guidelines Monday amid challenges that judges were unconstitutionally justifying steeper sentences based on elements not considered by juries. Leaving the guidelines intact avoided what might have been the resentencing of thousands of prisoners. The decision was the third this year by California's justices interpreting new precedents established by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court was asked Friday by the state attorney general to reconsider a ruling issued Jan. 2 reversing the death sentence imposed in a grisly 1981 torture-murder case in San Bernardino. In a wave of final actions by the court under Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird, the justices held 4 to 3 that Melvin Meffery Wade is entitled to a new penalty trial in the killing of his 10-year-old stepdaughter.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Internet retailers of music and other downloadable products may seek personal identifying information from consumers that ordinary stores in California are barred from asking for, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday. By a 4-3 vote, the state high court said Apple Inc., which sells music on its iTunes site, and similar retailers were not covered by a consumer law that prevents California businesses from collecting personal information from credit card users. "While it is clear that the Legislature enacted the Credit Card Act to protect consumer privacy, it is also clear that the Legislature did not intend to achieve privacy protection without regard to exposing consumers and retailers to undue risk of fraud," Justice Goodwin Liu wrote for the majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2012 | By Chris Megerian and Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - An Arizona group was scrambling late Sunday to keep secret the individuals behind its $11-million donation to a California campaign fund after California's Supreme Court, in a rare and dramatic weekend action, ordered it to turn over records that could identify the donors. The order followed days of frenzied legal battles between California regulators, who have tried to get documents related to the anonymous contribution before election day, and attorneys for the Arizona nonprofit who have resisted delivering them.
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