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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Marshall Tuck, the longtime head of a nonprofit overseeing 15 Los Angeles campuses, will run for state schools superintendent, setting up a challenge to incumbent Tom Torlakson, who has been strongly backed by California's teacher unions, The Times has learned. Tuck confirmed in an interview that he plans to file his candidacy papers Wednesday; the election is next year. The role of state schools chief, Tuck said, is "to ensure that we're leading fundamental change in our schools, making sure we're shaking up an education bureaucracy from one that often blocks innovation to one that's facilitating and supporting it. " In challenging Torlakson, Tuck, 40, is taking on not only an incumbent, but almost certainly one of the state's most powerful interest groups as well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Marshall Tuck, the longtime head of a nonprofit overseeing 15 Los Angeles campuses, will run for state schools superintendent, setting up a challenge to incumbent Tom Torlakson, who has been strongly backed by California's teacher unions, The Times has learned. Tuck confirmed in an interview that he plans to file his candidacy papers Wednesday; the election is next year. The role of state schools chief, Tuck said, is "to ensure that we're leading fundamental change in our schools, making sure we're shaking up an education bureaucracy from one that often blocks innovation to one that's facilitating and supporting it. " In challenging Torlakson, Tuck, 40, is taking on not only an incumbent, but almost certainly one of the state's most powerful interest groups as well.
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NEWS
May 12, 1988
Huntington Beach elementary school teachers staged a one-day strike to underline their anger about threatened budget cuts and lack of agreement on a pay raise. At least 180 of the 220 teachers in the district carried signs and chanted in front of eight elementary schools. Some of their catcalls were directed at Bill Honig, state Supt. of Public Instruction, who had denounced plans for the strike, saying the teachers were being misled about finances by "renegade" union officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2009 | Seema Mehta and Howard Blume
As California received billions of dollars Friday to stave off widespread teacher layoffs, the state's highest elected education official pledged to reform schools, aligning academic standards with other states, rewarding teachers who work in the most challenging classrooms and improving student assessments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1997
Please know that many of the students in the Los Angeles Unified School District are much more disadvantaged than "Budget Deal Adds Day to School Year" (Aug. 11) reflects. The current law requires students to attend school for 180 days each year. Many overcrowded year-round schools are on a Concept 6 calendar designed to accommodate one-third more students; children on these schedules attend school for only 163 days per year. The 17 fewer days of attendance are supposedly adjusted for with 25 additional minutes of daily classroom instruction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991
In 1986 the main branch of the Los Angeles Public Library was the victim of an extensive fire which forced its closing. It will not really be open for "business as usual" until 1993. That will make it seven years--the proverbial seven years of bad luck--seven long years of denying the public access to its community's main store of learning and literary pleasure. Arson is a criminal offense. Monetary loss resulting from arson can be figured, if one wants to assess damages. Denial of usage loss, however, cannot be measured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Corina Knoll
Five educators have been named California Teachers of the Year, the state Department of Education announced Thursday. Chosen from among 60 applicants, the honorees are: Alastair Inman, a science teacher at Lexington Junior High School in Orange County; Alex Kajitani, a math teacher at Mission Middle School in San Diego County; Jose L. Navarro IV, a social studies and history teacher at Sylmar High School in Los Angeles; Mark Teeters, a music teacher...
OPINION
May 31, 1987
You would have to live on another planet not to be aware of the continuing feud between State Supt. of Education Bill Honig and Gov. George Deukmejian. It boggles the mind that two intelligent men can threaten the educational future of our children because of this silly feud. Both men say that education is their No. 1 priority, so why don't they shut up, shake hands, and prove it? Last fall the governor said he couldn't give the schools more money because it simply wasn't there.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig on Thursday issued a negative report card for Channel One, a controversial, satellite-delivered television show that introduced commercials to the classroom. "Our students' minds aren't for sale," Honig said in Anaheim as he announced that public schools would not be allowed to collect state money for the time that students spend watching the commercial television program. In March, Tennessee-based Whittle Communications introduced Channel One's pilot project at five high schools and one junior high school across the nation, including Gahr High School in Cerritos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Asserting that "when California educators set goals, they deliver," State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said that many of the state's elementary and middle schools have met "accountability targets" set by the state for performance on the California Assessment Program (CAP) test. However, schools in the Los Angeles area did not perform as well on the whole as those in the rest of the state. "I'm obviously disappointed," Honig said of Los Angeles area schools. "Two-thirds of the schools in our state are doing what we asked them to do," Honig said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Corina Knoll
Five educators have been named California Teachers of the Year, the state Department of Education announced Thursday. Chosen from among 60 applicants, the honorees are: Alastair Inman, a science teacher at Lexington Junior High School in Orange County; Alex Kajitani, a math teacher at Mission Middle School in San Diego County; Jose L. Navarro IV, a social studies and history teacher at Sylmar High School in Los Angeles; Mark Teeters, a music teacher...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell on Wednesday urged schools across California to work closely with local health officials to prepare for a potential pandemic flu. O'Connell unveiled a new checklist advising schools how to plan for a pandemic. Tips include supplying each room with soap, water and paper towels or hand sanitizer and establishing a backup chain of command in case employees fall ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1997
Please know that many of the students in the Los Angeles Unified School District are much more disadvantaged than "Budget Deal Adds Day to School Year" (Aug. 11) reflects. The current law requires students to attend school for 180 days each year. Many overcrowded year-round schools are on a Concept 6 calendar designed to accommodate one-third more students; children on these schedules attend school for only 163 days per year. The 17 fewer days of attendance are supposedly adjusted for with 25 additional minutes of daily classroom instruction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
State Supt. of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin plans to address community college leaders today at the Westin South Coast Plaza hotel in Costa Mesa. Eastin, the top education officer in the state, is meeting with the California Community Colleges Academic Senate at 1 p.m. Her remarks will address school reform, basic skills for adults and the role of two-year colleges, said spokesman Doug Stone.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In a bold reform effort that bypasses the California Legislature and Gov. Pete Wilson, state Supt. of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin said Thursday that she plans to use powers delegated to her under state law to free school districts from virtually every rule in the education code, in return for a commitment from the districts to meet higher standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
I'm still incredulous over your support of Delaine Eastin for state superintendent of public instruction, especially after you acknowledged one of her major flaws--her obligations to the California Teachers Assn.! You have high praise for Maureen DiMarco, yet you did not recommend her. I strongly request that the editorial board reconsider its endorsement. DiMarco has been an advocate for students and quality education long before her public service began. Ten years ago she started working at the state level first as the special consultant to the California Department of Education, then as executive consultant to the superintendent of public schools, and finally as the governor's cabinet secretary for child development and education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
State Supt. of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin plans to address community college leaders today at the Westin South Coast Plaza hotel in Costa Mesa. Eastin, the top education officer in the state, is meeting with the California Community Colleges Academic Senate at 1 p.m. Her remarks will address school reform, basic skills for adults and the role of two-year colleges, said spokesman Doug Stone.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Significantly higher numbers of California high school seniors are passing the demanding Advanced Placement examinations for college credits, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Wednesday. In addition, more than 31% of the state's public high school seniors--up from 25.4% in 1985--are completing the series of courses required for admission to the University of California system. "More of California students from all backgrounds are performing at higher levels than ever before. . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991
In 1986 the main branch of the Los Angeles Public Library was the victim of an extensive fire which forced its closing. It will not really be open for "business as usual" until 1993. That will make it seven years--the proverbial seven years of bad luck--seven long years of denying the public access to its community's main store of learning and literary pleasure. Arson is a criminal offense. Monetary loss resulting from arson can be figured, if one wants to assess damages. Denial of usage loss, however, cannot be measured.
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