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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed ballot measure to permit casino-type gambling in California, provided it stays within 10 miles of the Nevada border, was introduced Thursday by a Los Angeles assemblyman who said the California treasury would be the big winner. Similar plans to legalize slot machines, blackjack, craps, roulette and other casino games of chance have been talked about in the Capitol in the past, but never approved.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
California lawmakers are growing more frustrated over revelations that state agencies are hiding funds by not depositing them in the state treasury, but one legislative panel has stopped short of imposing a financial penalty against one of the departments involved. A Senate budget subcommittee balked Thursday at a staff recommendation that it reduce funding for the Department of Fish and Wildlife by $1 million until the agency management comes up with specific proposals to halt what lawmakers call the misappropriation of funds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
California's budget crisis has eased a bit, thanks to a South Carolina man grateful to the state for helping him 46 years ago. Dennis R. Ferguson wrote a check for $10,000 to the state treasury Nov. 23 as "repayment for what California did for me" when he was laid off from his aerospace engineering job in 1964. Ferguson, a 74-year-old retired computer programmer who lives in the Atlantic coastal community of Fripp Island, S.C., said the four months' worth of unemployment benefits he collected after losing his job with Douglas Aircraft allowed him to re-train for a new career in computers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
California's budget crisis has eased a bit, thanks to a South Carolina man grateful to the state for helping him 46 years ago. Dennis R. Ferguson wrote a check for $10,000 to the state treasury Nov. 23 as "repayment for what California did for me" when he was laid off from his aerospace engineering job in 1964. Ferguson, a 74-year-old retired computer programmer who lives in the Atlantic coastal community of Fripp Island, S.C., said the four months' worth of unemployment benefits he collected after losing his job with Douglas Aircraft allowed him to re-train for a new career in computers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
California lawmakers are growing more frustrated over revelations that state agencies are hiding funds by not depositing them in the state treasury, but one legislative panel has stopped short of imposing a financial penalty against one of the departments involved. A Senate budget subcommittee balked Thursday at a staff recommendation that it reduce funding for the Department of Fish and Wildlife by $1 million until the agency management comes up with specific proposals to halt what lawmakers call the misappropriation of funds.
NEWS
December 4, 1986
A poll of Californians entitled to refunds for purchases of Levi jeans in the 1970s indicates that they overwhelmingly favor using an expected $5 million in unclaimed funds for consumer education and litigation, lawyers for consumer groups said in San Francisco. Under a court-approved settlement of a price-fixing case brought by the state against Levi Strauss, the company did not admit wrongdoing but did agree to provide an estimated $17 million in rebates to 1.
NEWS
November 28, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
California's participation in the upcoming world exposition in Vancouver, Canada, has been assured by the collection of more than $1.7 million in private contributions, Gov. George Deukmejian announced Thursday. The contributions, along with $1.5 million appropriated under legislation written by Assemblywoman Lucy Killea (D-San Diego), will finance "a first-rate California exhibit" at Expo '86, Deukmejian said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1985 | KENNETH F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
California may not have a pavilion at Expo 86, next year's world exposition in Vancouver, Canada, unless $700,000 in private contributions is raised in a matter of days. The specter of falling short is upsetting to Democratic Assemblywoman Lucy Killea of San Diego. "I did my part. Now, I can't be the administrator too," said Killea, who authored legislation that required the Cabinet-level Secretary of Business, Transportation and Housing to collect $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996
This pertains to elderly and disabled people who are on Social Security and who get SSI as well. At one time, the state of California raised SSI every time the federal government raised Social Security and by the same percentage. Then, one year, the state did not raise SSI. Since that time, the state has decreased SSI every year until the state's portion is about $120 less per month than it was in 1990. The reason given for this has been that the government must live within its income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1995
Robert Oliphant's argument for having all lower-division teaching concentrated in the community colleges ("Eliminating the Lower Divisions," March 19) does have one serious flaw. His proposal might indeed benefit students and taxpayers alike were it not for the fact that the same financial pressures which handicap the faculty teaching at four-year schools are even more intense at the community college level. What has been keeping those of us who do teach transfer courses in the community colleges honest is the idea that we must try to offer at least as good a preparation for our upper-division work as would be available in other segments of California higher education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Jerry Brown messed up as governor 32 years ago in implementing Proposition 13, the insurgent property-tax slasher. Now he'll have a second chance to get it right. The Legislature screwed up too. In fact, it led the way. Those lawmakers are long gone from the Capitol. But Brown is back, trying to piece together a new administration and craft a state budget to address a seemingly bottomless deficit pit. If he knew in 1978 what he knows today, Brown presumably would have responded differently to Prop.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2009 | Richard Simon and Evan Halper
The $789-billion economic stimulus bill headed toward congressional approval is expected to pour $26 billion into California -- building roads, upgrading schools and launching other projects intended to create or save jobs. The expectation is that the federal government will funnel at least $9.2 billion directly to the state treasury, mostly for education and healthcare, in the next 18 months. Millions of Californians will get a tax cut aimed at promoting consumer spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2007 | George Skelton
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger recently vetoed a dozen bills that the California Chamber of Commerce alleged were anti-business "job-killers." In the chamber's view, the governor's action will create jobs. Fine. How is this deficit-plagued state going to pay for the jobs? Yes, of course, they're private-enterprise jobs, not government. But who's going to pay for the roads and transit to get these people to work? To educate their kids? To provide police protection?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's plan to turn the state lottery over to a private firm has put the Democrats who dominate the Legislature in a bind: Despite their long-standing distaste for privatization schemes, the proposal offers an influx of cash that could prove too tempting to turn down. In the plan, laid out in documents obtained by The Times this week, the state would lease the lottery to a private operator for up to 40 years in return for as much as $37 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
State Controller Steve Westly reaffirmed Friday that he plans to borrow the maximum amount allowable -- $9 billion to $11 billion -- to keep state government afloat as lawmakers struggle to solve the budget crisis. He described it as the largest such borrowing in state history, but said even that won't buy much time: If a budget is not passed by the end of summer, the state will run out of cash and be forced to give workers promises instead of paychecks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a summer of delays, California regulators and legislators are aiming in one final week to resolve issues crucial to millions of electricity customers and the financial stability of the state and its utilities. The energy crisis that caused blackouts early this year has receded, but it has left behind a potential fiscal crisis. The state needs to recoup more than $8 billion that it has spent on power, and it has signed $43 billion in long-term electricity contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001
California faces two critical money problems as the air conditioning season sets in: the outrageous cost of electric power and the plundering of the state budget to pay for it. Only Washington has the authority to regulate wholesale power prices, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission struggled for hours Wednesday before coming up with a dubious control plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
State Controller Steve Westly reaffirmed Friday that he plans to borrow the maximum amount allowable -- $9 billion to $11 billion -- to keep state government afloat as lawmakers struggle to solve the budget crisis. He described it as the largest such borrowing in state history, but said even that won't buy much time: If a budget is not passed by the end of summer, the state will run out of cash and be forced to give workers promises instead of paychecks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001
California faces two critical money problems as the air conditioning season sets in: the outrageous cost of electric power and the plundering of the state budget to pay for it. Only Washington has the authority to regulate wholesale power prices, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission struggled for hours Wednesday before coming up with a dubious control plan.
OPINION
March 26, 2000
Whether consumer and business purchases over the Internet should pay the same sales tax assessed in stores started as a simple question of fairness, of treating all buyers and sellers alike. It has turned into a broader battle involving the electronic industry, anti-tax members of Congress and state and local authorities, all defending their own interests.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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