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NEWS
October 17, 1988
Doctors at a New York university kept the heart of a dead man beating to test a new drug designed to prevent blood clots that can lead to heart attacks or strokes, a medical journal reported. An editorial accompanying the article in the Annals of Internal Medicine called the experiment "ethically questionable." Researchers at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Centocor, a pharmaceutical firm in Malvern, Pa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Physicist John H. Marburger III, who served as President George W. Bush's science advisor at a time when most researchers considered science to be under attack by the government, died July 28 at his home in Port Jefferson, N.Y. He was 70 and had non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He also served as dean of USC's College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, as president of State University of New York at Stony Brook and as head of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island. "Jack Marburger was a superb advocate for science, a visionary leader, and a highly skilled administrator who successfully led three vital institutions," said Dr. Samuel L. Stanley Jr., the current president of Stony Brook.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Physicist John H. Marburger III, who served as President George W. Bush's science advisor at a time when most researchers considered science to be under attack by the government, died July 28 at his home in Port Jefferson, N.Y. He was 70 and had non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He also served as dean of USC's College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, as president of State University of New York at Stony Brook and as head of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island. "Jack Marburger was a superb advocate for science, a visionary leader, and a highly skilled administrator who successfully led three vital institutions," said Dr. Samuel L. Stanley Jr., the current president of Stony Brook.
NEWS
October 17, 1988
Doctors at a New York university kept the heart of a dead man beating to test a new drug designed to prevent blood clots that can lead to heart attacks or strokes, a medical journal reported. An editorial accompanying the article in the Annals of Internal Medicine called the experiment "ethically questionable." Researchers at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Centocor, a pharmaceutical firm in Malvern, Pa.
NEWS
July 31, 1993
Lauren V. Ackerman, 88, a cancer pathologist and author of medical textbooks. Ackerman had been a professor of pathology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook since 1973. He taught at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis from 1948 to 1973. His books include "Surgical Pathology," published in 1953, and "Cancer: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prognosis," written with Dr. Juan del Regado. In New York City on Tuesday of cancer.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hospital meals may be loaded with fat, cholesterol and salt, according to a study to be published in the New England Journal of Medicine. A survey of 57 teaching hospitals found only 1 in 14 routinely offers meals to patients that meet the latest guidelines for promoting health and reducing heart disease. Led by Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Fossils of small mammals once thought to be unique to South America have been found in India and Madagascar, providing new evidence that those areas were linked in the massive supercontinent of Gondwana as recently as 65 million years ago. The fossils are from the Late Cretaceous period, about 65 million to 70 million years ago, when some researchers believe the continents had already gone their separate ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1988
More than half of all doctors' orders for diagnostic tests are altered by hospital clerks or lab technicians, but the tests actually performed are usually more appropriate than the ones the doctor ordered, a study indicated last week. On average, the study of two New York hospitals found that clerical alterations or laboratory "interpretations" of doctors' orders decreased the amount of inappropriate testing from 37% to 25%. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999
Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have peered 13 billion years back into time, almost to the dawn of creation, to find the oldest, most distant object ever detected: a galaxy fizzing with stars that were new when the light was emitted from the galaxy. It lies near the edge of the universe, 13 billion light-years from Earth, where its presence was detected by its faint ultraviolet light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1987
Calculus, dreadnought of the college curriculum, has failed to keep pace with the computer age and is in dire need of change, leaders of a mathematics symposium at the National Academy of Sciences said last week. Of the 600,000 college students who took calculus last year, a third or more are believed to have failed or withdrawn. Calculus, invented in the 17th Century by Isaac Newton and Gottfried Liebnitz, is the branch of mathematics that deals with continuously changing quantities.
WORLD
September 22, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Ghanaian poet Kofi Awoonor, one of Africa's most distinguished literary figures, was among the scores of people killed by Al Qaeda-aligned terrorists who attacked a busy shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, over the weekend. Awoonor, 78, was killed Saturday when members of Al Shabab, a Somali-based militia, seized the Westgate Shopping Mall in a hail of bullets in Kenya's worst terrorist attack in years. "I am shocked to hear the death of professor Kofi Awoonor in the Nairobi mall terrorist attack.
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