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State Water Project

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2003 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
The Kern River, dry as bone, meets Interstate 5 on an expanse of land no longer tamed by agriculture. The last stand of cotton was plowed under a decade ago, and now tumbleweeds hide jackrabbits and coyotes. But cotton's white gold has given way to new riches stored deep below the ground. That's where 730,000 acre-feet of water -- a lake worth more than $180 million on the open market -- awaits the pump.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials Friday said that for the first time ever, the State Water Project that helps supply a majority of Californians may be unable to make any deliveries except to maintain public health and safety.  They also said they were cutting releases from large reservoirs in the northern part of the state to preserve supplies in the face of what could be the worst drought in modern California history. “It's about holding back water so we've got it tomorrow,” said Chuck Bonham, director of the Department of Fish and Wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Of the many issues hanging over the proposal to burrow enormous tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and replumb the hub of California's water system, the one most likely to make or break the $25-billion project is money. Just who, exactly, is going to pay for it? The San Joaquin Valley irrigation districts and urban water agencies in Southern California and the San Francisco Bay Area that get water supplies from the delta have promised to pick up most of the tab, with federal and state taxpayers paying the rest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Late spring storms smothered the Sierra in snow. The state's biggest reservoir is nearly full. Precipitation across much of California has been above average. By standard measures, California's three-year drought is over. "From a hydrologic standpoint, for most of California, it is gone," said state hydrologist Maury Roos, who has monitored the ups and downs of the state's water for 50 years. But Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger isn't lifting his drought declaration. Los Angeles isn't ending its watering restrictions and Southern California's major water wholesaler isn't reversing delivery cuts.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Despite water shortages that idled farmland and withered lawns, California's emergency water bank ended up buying about $45 million more in water than it could sell, state and local officials told lawmakers Monday. Bob Potter, deputy director of the state Water Resources Department, said the State Water Project will buy the water for reserves in case the drought continues into a sixth year this winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ventura City Council on Monday hired as project manager for the city's proposed desalination plant a civil engineer who recommended last year hooking up with the State Water Project over desalination. Glenn McPherson of Boyle Engineering Corp., based in Newport Beach, has been chosen to head the construction of the plant, which residents voted for in November over the State Water Project.
SCIENCE
February 21, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Central Valley growers Friday got the grim news they have been expecting for months. Most of them will get no water from the big federal irrigation project that supplies 3 million acres of California farm land. Citing the state's severe drought, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced an initial water allocation of zero for most contractors of the sprawling Central Valley Project. That could change. There is a month of winter left and storms on the Northern California horizon could boost reservoir levels, allowing reclamation to deliver more water.
BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Dean E. Mann
In a 1960 book, economist Jack Hirschleifer declared that the shortage of water in the United States was like the shortage of $500 Cadillacs. When price is kept artificially low, demand will naturally exceed available supply, whether an automobile or water is the object of desire. In two remarkably comprehensive and well-written books, Donald Worster and Marc Reisner consider the role that water--especially artificially cheap water--has played in the development of the West. Both books are concerned primarily with federal water policy, particularly the role of the Bureau of Reclamation in water development, and both take strong issue with the dominant popular view of irrigation agriculture and its meaning for the West and for American society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors approved an agreement Tuesday that allows Santa Clarita Valley water agencies with ample ground-water reserves to sell water to other agencies in the area. The agreement will enable two water companies with ground water to spare--Valencia Water Co. and the Newhall Water District--to sell to the Santa Clarita Water Co., which needs additional water, and the County Waterworks District in Val Verde, which has no wells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The California Department of Water Resources plans to reopen popular Pyramid Lake after a 45-day closure for sediment removal. The state said Wednesday that the lake 60 miles north of downtown Los Angeles will open again Saturday. During the closure, crews lowered the lake about 23 feet and removed 32,000 cubic yards of sediment that accumulated around a U.S. Forest Service dock over several decades. The lake and its dam were completed in 1973 as part of the State Water Project.
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