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State Water Project

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A court ruling issued Wednesday could throw up obstacles to operation of a Kern County groundwater bank that has helped billionaire Stewart Resnick build a nut empire in the southern San Joaquin Valley. In the latest development in a two-decade legal fight, a Sacramento County Superior Court judge found that the state Department of Water Resources didn't properly analyze the environmental impacts of the Kern Water Bank, which is partly controlled by Resnick's Paramount Farms enterprise.
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NEWS
September 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Harvey O. Banks, an internationally known water engineer who played a key role in developing California's State Water Project, has died of leukemia at age 86. Banks died Sunday in Austin, Texas, where he had lived in recent years. A former director of the California Department of Water Resources, Banks was perhaps best known for his efforts to get the State Water Project built.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Despite water shortages that idled farmland and withered lawns, California's emergency water bank ended up buying about $45 million more in water than it could sell, state and local officials told lawmakers Monday. Bob Potter, deputy director of the state Water Resources Department, said the State Water Project will buy the water for reserves in case the drought continues into a sixth year this winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ventura City Council on Monday hired as project manager for the city's proposed desalination plant a civil engineer who recommended last year hooking up with the State Water Project over desalination. Glenn McPherson of Boyle Engineering Corp., based in Newport Beach, has been chosen to head the construction of the plant, which residents voted for in November over the State Water Project.
BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Dean E. Mann
In a 1960 book, economist Jack Hirschleifer declared that the shortage of water in the United States was like the shortage of $500 Cadillacs. When price is kept artificially low, demand will naturally exceed available supply, whether an automobile or water is the object of desire. In two remarkably comprehensive and well-written books, Donald Worster and Marc Reisner consider the role that water--especially artificially cheap water--has played in the development of the West. Both books are concerned primarily with federal water policy, particularly the role of the Bureau of Reclamation in water development, and both take strong issue with the dominant popular view of irrigation agriculture and its meaning for the West and for American society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors approved an agreement Tuesday that allows Santa Clarita Valley water agencies with ample ground-water reserves to sell water to other agencies in the area. The agreement will enable two water companies with ground water to spare--Valencia Water Co. and the Newhall Water District--to sell to the Santa Clarita Water Co., which needs additional water, and the County Waterworks District in Val Verde, which has no wells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The California Department of Water Resources plans to reopen popular Pyramid Lake after a 45-day closure for sediment removal. The state said Wednesday that the lake 60 miles north of downtown Los Angeles will open again Saturday. During the closure, crews lowered the lake about 23 feet and removed 32,000 cubic yards of sediment that accumulated around a U.S. Forest Service dock over several decades. The lake and its dam were completed in 1973 as part of the State Water Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988
Californians are constantly told that the state Water Project is far from completed as envisioned when voters approved the massive water-transfer program back in 1960. True, but this does not mean that work on the project has come to a halt. Construction has been completed just this month on the $97.7-million, 24-mile-long North Bay Aqueduct that will carry water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to growing areas of Solano and Napa counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1987
The focal point of California water fights is this old saw: The north has the water and the south takes it. But that is a simplistic notion that holds even less water today than it did just a month ago. There is the common belief that state Water Project supplies all flow directly to Kern County farmers and to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
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