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State Water Project

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
As 2013 draws to a close, it is headed for the record books as the driest year in downtown Los Angeles since 1877, when official measurements began. Only 3.60 inches have fallen at the National Weather Service station at USC since Jan. 1, about half an inch less than was recorded in 1953 and 1947, which until now had tied for the lowest rainfall. With sun, sun and more sun in the forecast for the remaining few days of the year, meteorologists say there is virtually no chance of wet weather to undo the new record.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Of the many issues hanging over the proposal to burrow enormous tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and replumb the hub of California's water system, the one most likely to make or break the $25-billion project is money. Just who, exactly, is going to pay for it? The San Joaquin Valley irrigation districts and urban water agencies in Southern California and the San Francisco Bay Area that get water supplies from the delta have promised to pick up most of the tab, with federal and state taxpayers paying the rest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A court ruling issued Wednesday could throw up obstacles to operation of a Kern County groundwater bank that has helped billionaire Stewart Resnick build a nut empire in the southern San Joaquin Valley. In the latest development in a two-decade legal fight, a Sacramento County Superior Court judge found that the state Department of Water Resources didn't properly analyze the environmental impacts of the Kern Water Bank, which is partly controlled by Resnick's Paramount Farms enterprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2003 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
The Kern River, dry as bone, meets Interstate 5 on an expanse of land no longer tamed by agriculture. The last stand of cotton was plowed under a decade ago, and now tumbleweeds hide jackrabbits and coyotes. But cotton's white gold has given way to new riches stored deep below the ground. That's where 730,000 acre-feet of water -- a lake worth more than $180 million on the open market -- awaits the pump.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Students of California's history of gold and oil rushes know it's filled with examples of profiteering, conspiracy, influence-peddling and other chicanery. So there's no reason the story should be any different with that liquid gold of the 21st century, water. That's the theme of a lawsuit filed a few weeks ago alleging there's something smelly about how a group of private interests — notably a huge agribusiness owned by the wealthy Southern California couple Stewart and Lynda Resnick — got control of an underground water storage project the state had already spent $75 million to develop.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | Associated Press
Despite water shortages that idled farmland and withered lawns, California's emergency water bank ended up buying about $45 million more in water than it could sell, state and local officials told lawmakers Monday. Bob Potter, deputy director of the state Water Resources Department, said the State Water Project will buy the water for reserves in case the drought continues into a sixth year this winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ventura City Council on Monday hired as project manager for the city's proposed desalination plant a civil engineer who recommended last year hooking up with the State Water Project over desalination. Glenn McPherson of Boyle Engineering Corp., based in Newport Beach, has been chosen to head the construction of the plant, which residents voted for in November over the State Water Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors approved an agreement Tuesday that allows Santa Clarita Valley water agencies with ample ground-water reserves to sell water to other agencies in the area. The agreement will enable two water companies with ground water to spare--Valencia Water Co. and the Newhall Water District--to sell to the Santa Clarita Water Co., which needs additional water, and the County Waterworks District in Val Verde, which has no wells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The California Department of Water Resources plans to reopen popular Pyramid Lake after a 45-day closure for sediment removal. The state said Wednesday that the lake 60 miles north of downtown Los Angeles will open again Saturday. During the closure, crews lowered the lake about 23 feet and removed 32,000 cubic yards of sediment that accumulated around a U.S. Forest Service dock over several decades. The lake and its dam were completed in 1973 as part of the State Water Project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988
Californians are constantly told that the state Water Project is far from completed as envisioned when voters approved the massive water-transfer program back in 1960. True, but this does not mean that work on the project has come to a halt. Construction has been completed just this month on the $97.7-million, 24-mile-long North Bay Aqueduct that will carry water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to growing areas of Solano and Napa counties.
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