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NATIONAL
December 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An 11th victim of the Staten Island Ferry crash died of her injuries, two months after the vessel smashed into a pier. Debra Castro, 39, lost one leg and part of the other, and also suffered a broken arm, a severed ear and pelvic injuries. She had been hospitalized and heavily sedated since the Oct. 15 wreck. Castro was returning home from a doctor's appointment when the ferry smashed into a concrete pier in Staten Island after crossing New York Harbor from Manhattan.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The former director of the Staten Island ferry pleaded guilty to manslaughter and lying to federal investigators in the October 2003 crash that killed 11 passengers. Patrick Ryan, who expressed remorse at federal court in Brooklyn for neglecting to implement safety rules requiring two pilots in the wheel house during operation of the ferry, faces six months to a year in prison. The ferry crashed after pilot Richard Smith blacked out and there was no backup to take over the steering.
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NATIONAL
August 6, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New York City's director of ferries pleaded not guilty to 11 counts of manslaughter in the October wreck of a Staten Island ferry. Patrick Ryan left the federal courthouse without speaking to reporters. His attorney, Tom Fitzpatrick, said he and Ryan were taken aback by the harshness of the charges. Eleven people died and dozens were hurt when the ferry's pilot blacked out and the craft slammed into a maintenance pier.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The National Transportation Safety Board sharply criticized New York City and the Coast Guard in the 2003 Staten Island Ferry crash that killed 11 passengers, saying tougher medical screening of ferry captains and safer operating procedures were needed. The board said the city's oversight was partly to blame for the crash, but stopped short of saying the Coast Guard's current system directly caused the deadly Oct. 15, 2003, accident.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
The captain of the Staten Island ferry that crashed into a pier last month, killing 10 people, finally met with investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board on Thursday, but would give only his name and age. NTSB head Ellen G. Engleman said that Michael Gansas exercised his 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination and refused to answer questions about the Oct. 15 accident. "We hope we will be able to talk to Capt. Gansas in the future," Engleman said in a statement.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The National Transportation Safety Board sharply criticized New York City and the Coast Guard in the 2003 Staten Island Ferry crash that killed 11 passengers, saying tougher medical screening of ferry captains and safer operating procedures were needed. The board said the city's oversight was partly to blame for the crash, but stopped short of saying the Coast Guard's current system directly caused the deadly Oct. 15, 2003, accident.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2003 | From Newsday
The captain of the Staten Island ferry that crashed last month has been fired by the city's Department of Transportation. In a brief statement Thursday night, department spokesman Tom Cocola said Michael Gansas "will not be on the Department of Transportation's payroll" today. The department suspended Gansas without pay Oct. 22 for refusing to cooperate with investigators probing the Oct. 15 crash that killed 10 passengers and injured dozens of others.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
There was no evidence that the pilot at the controls of a ferry that crashed into a Staten Island pier last month had taken prescription drugs, a city official said a day after federal prosecutors took over the investigation. Assistant Capt. Richard Smith said he had taken blood pressure medication earlier in the day and slumped over the controls, but the city official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said blood tests showed the pilot had not taken prescription drugs before the crash Oct.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal prosecutors announced a criminal investigation into the crash of a Staten Island commuter ferry on Oct. 15 that killed 10 people and injured dozens of others. Roslynn Mauskopf, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, said her office would try to determine if there was criminal liability and, if so, hold those involved accountable. Michael Gansas, the captain of the ferry that crashed into a pier, has been ordered to appear before the federal court in Brooklyn on Nov. 5.
NEWS
December 16, 1989
How about this for the next Super(boring) Fight: Michael Nunn vs. Sugar Ray Leonard. Promoted by Dance Fever. Special judges: Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor and Denny Terrio. The fight could be held in France and called "The Last Tango in Paris." DANNY EROWITZ, Sherman Oaks
NATIONAL
June 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Two crew members on the Staten Island Ferry were suspended for allegedly violating safety rules, which were revised after a fatal crash last year. The Department of Transportation said the two crewmen repeatedly neglected to take up their assigned lookout positions. City inspectors, who routinely ride the ferry to monitor ship operations, reported the violations. Mate Steven P. Lupo and deckhand Richard M.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An 11th victim of the Staten Island Ferry crash died of her injuries, two months after the vessel smashed into a pier. Debra Castro, 39, lost one leg and part of the other, and also suffered a broken arm, a severed ear and pelvic injuries. She had been hospitalized and heavily sedated since the Oct. 15 wreck. Castro was returning home from a doctor's appointment when the ferry smashed into a concrete pier in Staten Island after crossing New York Harbor from Manhattan.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2003 | From Associated Press
Six weeks after losing both legs in the Staten Island ferry crash, Paul Esposito remains on five different painkillers. On Thursday, he received the best medicine yet: his release from the hospital. "Friends and family are the best painkiller of all," Esposito said as he left Staten Island University Hospital. Doctors there saved his life after the horrific Oct. 15 crash, which killed 10 people and injured more than 60.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2003 | From Newsday
The captain of the Staten Island ferry that crashed last month has been fired by the city's Department of Transportation. In a brief statement Thursday night, department spokesman Tom Cocola said Michael Gansas "will not be on the Department of Transportation's payroll" today. The department suspended Gansas without pay Oct. 22 for refusing to cooperate with investigators probing the Oct. 15 crash that killed 10 passengers and injured dozens of others.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
There was no evidence that the pilot at the controls of a ferry that crashed into a Staten Island pier last month had taken prescription drugs, a city official said a day after federal prosecutors took over the investigation. Assistant Capt. Richard Smith said he had taken blood pressure medication earlier in the day and slumped over the controls, but the city official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said blood tests showed the pilot had not taken prescription drugs before the crash Oct.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
The captain of the Staten Island ferry that crashed into a pier last month, killing 10 people, finally met with investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board on Thursday, but would give only his name and age. NTSB head Ellen G. Engleman said that Michael Gansas exercised his 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination and refused to answer questions about the Oct. 15 accident. "We hope we will be able to talk to Capt. Gansas in the future," Engleman said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The state Senate has approved a bill to let Staten Island residents vote on whether to secede from New York City. The proposal was introduced after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in March that the makeup of the city's powerful Board of Estimate, which rules on spending and projects, violated the principle of one man, one vote. Staten Island, the city's smallest borough with about 400,000 residents, has an equal presence on the board with the other four boroughs, including Brooklyn, which has 2.2 million people.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Facing a possible contempt citation, the captain of the Staten Island ferry that crashed into a pier last month, killing 10 people, agreed Wednesday to meet with investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board. But the degree of his willingness to cooperate remains uncertain. After notifying a federal judge during a brief court session that Michael Gansas would honor an NTSB subpoena today, one of his lawyers added a clarification: Catherine Foti corrected U.S.
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