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NEWS
January 3, 1991 | Associated Press
At least 28 states, including California, are facing shortfalls this year in their already enacted 1991 budgets, thanks to the faltering economy and growing demands for spending, a survey released Wednesday said. The troubled states, whose numbers are expected to grow as the economy worsens, face a combined shortage of $9.6 billion, or 3.2% of their planned expenditures, the report said. "That $9.6 billion is an extremely large number this early in a recession," said Gerald H.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Tim Logan
Three community groups sued Gov. Jerry Brown on Friday, demanding he restore more than $350 million in mortgage settlement funds that were used to plug state budget holes two years ago. The money - from California's slice of the $25 billion national mortgage settlement with banks in 2012 - was supposed to fund housing counseling and foreclosure relief programs. But with the state facing a $16-billion budget deficit that spring, Brown diverted it to the state's general fund and to pay down interest on housing bonds.
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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
If the political cross-fire in the state capitals intensifies any this spring, many of the nation's governors may soon be looking for combat pay. Or other jobs. It's nervous time in the statehouses: While President Bush's public approval rating sails into the clouds, many of the nation's governors are uneasily watching their popularity plummet. Why are the governors sinking while Bush is soaring?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | By Howard Blume
An improving economy and a voter-approved tax increase will pay faster dividends for California schools than expected, resulting in a $10-billion funding boost over last year under the governor's proposed budget . The increase is especially welcome for the Los Angeles Unified School District, the state's largest school system, which will receive a greater share of dollars under a new state funding formula. The state's budget for school districts and community colleges is expected to reach $61.6 billion next year, an increase of $6.3 billion when compared with the funding formula for the current academic year.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In statehouses from Boston to Sacramento, the only commodity more scarce than money this summer is optimism. After a grueling spring slashing programs and raising taxes to balance budgets for the fiscal year that began July 1, many states are expecting more of the same in the months--perhaps years--to come. Even if the economy recovers more rapidly than now appears likely, experts say, states still face a lasting structural imbalance between demands and resources.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last spring, after Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and the state Legislature finally approved a spending plan for the current fiscal year, they boasted that they had cut so deeply that something rare in recent state budgets would happen: No midyear revisions would be needed to make up for any unforeseen shortfalls in revenues. What the governor and the Legislature did not count on, however, was the severity of the nationwide economic recession.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Revenues are pouring into most state government coffers at an unexpectedly high rate, making surpluses likely--but not necessarily tax cuts, a survey found. As legislative sessions open around the nation this month, 30 states say they've taken in more tax collections so far this budget year than they had predicted. Eighteen others say revenues are coming in on target, according to an annual fiscal report of the states done by the National Conference of State Legislatures.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as most people here can remember, Minnesota has prided itself on being one of the nation's most progressive states. A generous safety net of health and welfare programs protects citizens here from cradle to grave. There are dozens of well-kept state parks, and a state-supported college or vocational school within commuting distance for every Minnesotan. "Many people view us as a socialist state," John Gunyou, the state's commissioner of finance, says with a chuckle.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leticia Cruz's worst fear is coming true. This Friday, barring some last-minute reprieve, the 30-year-old dental assistant at a city-run clinic will be out of a job, a victim of New York City's worst fiscal crisis since the mid-1970s. "I've been staying up nights worried about what's going to happen to me," said Cruz, a single mother with two children. "I don't have enough money to see me through." Cruz is not alone.
NEWS
January 9, 1993
With the state economy slow to recover from recession and tax revenues down, Gov. Pete Wilson has proposed spending $51.2 billion in state funds for the 12 months ending June 30, 1994. That is a sharp reduction from the $57.5 billion in spending estimated for the current fiscal year. To balance his budget, the governor is urging the Legislature to cut welfare grants 19% and will call on the federal government to provide $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman has turned his cameras on a mental hospital, dance troupes, a racetrack, the military and a state legislature. His 38th documentary examines education, campus leadership and student protest at UC Berkeley in 2010 during the state budget crisis. Edited from 250 hours' worth of material, his "At Berkeley" is a four-hour, four-minute tour, without narration, of literature classes, robotics labs, football games and the inner sanctums of administrators facing tough decisions on a beautiful campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Hundreds of new full-time faculty would be hired to teach high-demand courses at California State University campuses under a budget plan to be considered by trustees Tuesday. Under the proposal, about $13 million would be used to hire more than 500 full-time faculty members, enabling campuses to increase the number of classes in highly sought subjects such as English, algebra, geography and biology. An additional $8 million would pay for 70 new academic advisors, a crucial component in the system's push to have students meet graduation requirements more quickly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Nearly 20,000 more students and 1,000 more classes would be accommodated next year under a preliminary budget plan that will be presented to California State University trustees Tuesday. The plan seeks an additional $250 million from the state and, in a statement likely to cheer the hearts of students and their families, assumes there will be no increase in tuition for the 2014-15 academic year. More than 430,000 students attend Cal State's 23 campuses, which make up the largest system of higher education in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The former No. 2 administrator at Michigan State and a recent finalist to lead several other public universities across the country has been nominated to be the next chancellor of UC Riverside, officials announced Thursday. Kim A. Wilcox, an expert in speech and hearing disorders who helped lead Michigan State University during a period of state budget cuts, is expected to be confirmed by UC regents as head of the 22,000-student Riverside campus. His salary and other terms of employment will not be publicly released until the regents vote on his nomination during a teleconference Aug. 8. Friends say Wilcox long wanted to be in charge of a campus and saw no short-term chance that Michigan State President Lou Anna K. Simon would retire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Flanked by fellow Democrats and other political allies, Gov. Jerry Brown approved California's new budget Thursday, changing very little of the $96.3-billion spending plan before signing it into law. Brown said California's finances are "in very solid shape" after years of deficits and touted increased spending on schools and healthcare for the poor. "It is a big day for schoolkids. It's a big day for Californians who don't have healthcare," Brown said. "California is the leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown signed the budget at night in his Capitol office with only a few aides and a photographer to keep him company. This year there's going to be a more festive atmosphere - he's holding a news conference Thursday with top Democratic lawmakers. Once Brown signs his name, the $96.3-billion spending plan will take effect Monday.  He is also expected to sign legislation expanding the state's healthcare program for the poor, part of President Obama's national overhaul.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Arts advocates who tried to throw a touchdown bomb in Sacramento this spring were sacked for a loss instead Friday as the California Legislature passed a $234-billion budget that cuts funding for the state's arts grant-making agency 7.6%. The budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year that begins July 1 includes $5.024 million for the California Arts Council -- $412,000 less than its current funding. It's a far cry from the $75 million in guaranteed annual funding that arts advocates had sought in a bill that got tabled last month in the state Assembly's appropriations committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- The California Legislature passed a $96.3-billion budget on Friday, sending it to Gov. Jerry Brown for final approval. The budget will redistribute education funding to help needier school districts, prepare for an expansion of public healthcare coverage, and lay the groundwork for years of spending increases for social services. Brown is expected to sign the budget. It was passed with a party line vote. Lawmakers will spend the rest of the day -- and possibly some of Saturday -- considering a collection of related budget bills.
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