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NEWS
February 7, 1995 | KELLY OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Jeffrey Bell, a conservative author and activist, public schools are places that shut out parents and are ruled by bureaucrats who enforce mediocrity, undermine parental guidance and probe into children's home lives. So he and like-minded parents have joined in a Virginia-based organization to push for adoption of a "parental-rights amendment" to state constitutions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
To the relief of families who dread annual tuition increases, a growing number of public and private colleges are moving to freeze those bills so that students pay the same amount in their freshman through senior years. The idea is to give students and parents some financial stability at a time of other economic worries and mounting student debt. The predictability pleases Joshua Deal, 19, of San Diego. He is a junior at Northern Arizona University, one of the estimated 40 schools in the nation that offer such guarantees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1995
Your editorial of April 25, "Monumental Show Hits the Road," was welcomed by those of us who are trying to publicize the importance of this issue. The California Constitution directly imposes regulations on us long after they are appropriate, and it requires a vote of the people to modify or remove them. For example, Article XV limits the interest rate to 7% per annum. Then it continues to list various exemptions that were approved in 1909, 1917 and 1927. We have seen a shift from a goods-based economy to a service-based economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
The landscape will be shifting at the state Capitol. Political dynamics are in transition. And the first unmistakable sign may be the Legislature's meeting its budget deadline for the first time in a generation. The California Constitution says flat-out that "The Legislature shall pass the budget bill by midnight on June 15…. " Yet, the lawmakers haven't completed their budget work on time since 1986. Who cares? Teachers sweating layoff notices, not knowing whether there'll be enough money to fund their jobs in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1992
It's easy to understand the affection that many San Diegans feel for the graceful simplicity of the 43-foot white cross that has topped Mt. Soledad in La Jolla for almost 50 years. For many Christians, it's the site of inspiring Easter services; for others, just the familiarity is a sort of spiritual comfort; still others revere it as a veterans memorial, which is its stated purpose.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN and LOUIS M. BROWN, Klein is an attorney and president of The Times Valley and Ventura County editions. Brown is professor of law emeritus at USC and chairman of the board for the National Center for Preventive Law
You'll often hear commentators, lawyers or journalists talking about protecting your constitutional rights. But what are your constitutional rights, anyway? Most people understand that the U.S. Constitution is at the core of the rights we enjoy in this country. Many of the fundamental rights--free speech, freedom of religion, the right to bear arms--arise from the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights.
OPINION
February 28, 2010
What might've been Re "Status quo 1, reform 0," Editorial, Feb. 21 Three cheers for The Times' editorial mourning the likely demise of a constitutional convention for California. Until a few weeks ago, I resisted the impulse to support a constitutional convention. Today, I say: "Why not?" At least it would signify some form of positive movement. Ballot-box voting is no different from voting each week, statewide, on any given issue of the day. California is too great, too complex and too important to live and function the way it currently does.
OPINION
May 21, 2009
California is stuck. Schools are about to lay off teachers. Prisons are about to release inmates. Historic assets are on the block. Initiatives confuse. Revolts fail. No amount of electing and reelecting people who promise to fix things seems able to move us forward. It's time to reboot. There have been calls for months now to convene a state constitutional convention and, in essence, start over. It's a good idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1995 | BRUCE HERSCHENSOHN, Bruce Herschensohn is a political commentator. He ran against Sen. Barbara Boxer in 1992
I don't want Pete Wilson to run for the office of the presidency in 1996 because he said he wouldn't. It's that simple. Until last November, while Wilson was running for reelection as governor, he pledged to fulfill a full term should he win. Most Californians took him at his word. I did; I campaigned for him. We now discover that we made a serious error in judgment in assuming that he would keep his word. I have known and have respected Pete Wilson for decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992
During the Republican convention, what troubled many about the party's militant proclamation of "family values" was the suggestion that the power of government was soon to be extended into the home. What sort of family counts as a real family? What sorts of sexual relations are permitted and forbidden? Americans have not been accustomed to hearing these private matters debated by presidential candidates as if they were political matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2010 | By Hector Becerra and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors next week will consider pursuing legislation that would drastically reduce Vernon's historic control over who gets to live and vote in the tiny city, marking the latest effort by outsiders to bring change to the industrial enclave south of downtown L.A. The proposal, introduced by Supervisor Gloria Molina, calls for an amendment to the California Constitution that would direct that no more than 10% of the housing owned...
BUSINESS
August 18, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Students of California's history of gold and oil rushes know it's filled with examples of profiteering, conspiracy, influence-peddling and other chicanery. So there's no reason the story should be any different with that liquid gold of the 21st century, water. That's the theme of a lawsuit filed a few weeks ago alleging there's something smelly about how a group of private interests — notably a huge agribusiness owned by the wealthy Southern California couple Stewart and Lynda Resnick — got control of an underground water storage project the state had already spent $75 million to develop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that Proposition 209, the ballot measure that banned affirmative action by government, did not violate the federal Constitution. In a 6-1 ruling, the majority rejected a defense argued by San Francisco after it was sued over a program that gave women and minorities an advantage in obtaining city contracts. The court said the affirmative action program may continue only if the city shows it was narrowly tailored to address intentional discrimination by the city against businesses owned by women and minorities and that preferences were necessary to rectify the discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2010 | By Maura Dolan and Dan Weikel
Los Angeles and other California cities and counties may bar the Hare Krishnas and other groups from panhandling at airports, the California Supreme Court unanimously ruled Thursday. The state high court, reviving a 1997 Los Angeles ordinance aimed at LAX, ruled that bans on soliciting at airports do not violate state constitutional guarantees of free speech. Lawyers for Los Angeles said that about 100 individuals representing at least 15 groups solicit money regularly at LAX. Thursday's ruling is expected to lead other airports to consider ordinances similar to L.A.'s law, which would ban solicitations in the interior terminals, parking lots and adjacent sidewalks.
OPINION
February 28, 2010
What might've been Re "Status quo 1, reform 0," Editorial, Feb. 21 Three cheers for The Times' editorial mourning the likely demise of a constitutional convention for California. Until a few weeks ago, I resisted the impulse to support a constitutional convention. Today, I say: "Why not?" At least it would signify some form of positive movement. Ballot-box voting is no different from voting each week, statewide, on any given issue of the day. California is too great, too complex and too important to live and function the way it currently does.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2009 | By David Zucchino
When Cecil Bothwell took the oath of office as a city councilman this month, he did not swear to uphold the U.S. and North Carolina constitutions "so help me God." He merely affirmed that he would, without mentioning the Almighty. Nor did the political newcomer place his hand on a Bible. He simply kept it at his side. Bothwell, you see, is an atheist -- or as he often describes himself, a "post-theist." And that has outraged some in this picturesque mountain resort who say Bothwell violated an obscure clause in the state constitution that disqualifies from elected office "any person who shall deny the being of Almighty God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1995 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The California Constitution Revision Commission began the gritty business of trying to make state government work better Thursday by endorsing an overhaul of the budget process--the most glaring example of official gridlock and dysfunction in recent years. Taking its first action on a broad spectrum of proposed constitutional changes, the commission gave preliminary approval to a 12-point package of budget reforms that included a mandate that California have a balanced budget. The plan also allows passage of a budget by majority vote of each house of the Legislature rather than a two-thirds majority.
OPINION
October 28, 2009
More than a year ago, a group of business leaders called the Bay Area Council became so fed up with dysfunction in Sacramento that it called on California to start over. At the time, its plan struck many as a bit extreme. Sure, the state had some problems governing itself. But a constitutional convention? It sounded like a circus in the making. As the months rolled by, and party ideologues vilified lawmakers who dared to compromise, and budget deadlines passed unheeded, and the government issued IOUs, and elected officials unraveled the fabric of human services meant to protect people in need in just such hard times, and California's remarkable achievements began to look like ancient history, it became clear that the sad circus was already in progress.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
It is one of the enduring questions of religion and science, and lately of American politics: When does a fertilized egg become a person? Abortion foes, tired of a profusion of laws that limit but do not abolish abortion, are trying to answer the question in a way that they hope could put an end to legalized abortion. Across the country, they have revived efforts to amend state constitutions to declare that personhood -- and all rights accorded human beings -- begins at conception.
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