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NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
State courts should deal with abortion protesters who block access to clinics, Bush Administration officials told the Supreme Court on Wednesday, but a lawyer for clinic owners said protests in Wichita, Kan., showed that "states need federal help." The high court has a Virginia case under study, but lawyer John Schafer offered a reminder of the upheaval in Wichita caused when Operation Rescue targeted abortion clinics in that city. Hundreds of the anti-abortion group's members were arrested.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
The Los Angeles Unified School District does not need to release the names of teachers in connection with their performance ratings, according to a tentative court ruling issued Thursday. A three-judge state appellate court panel tentatively found a stronger public interest in keeping the names confidential than in publicly releasing them. Disclosure would not serve the public interest in monitoring the district's performance as much as it would affect the recruitment and retention of good instructors and other issues, the ruling said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1990
"State Study Says Courts Are Rife With Sex Bias," reported in The Times on March 24th! It took this special committee three years to discover widespread sex discrimination in California courts? Is there anywhere on earth that is not dominated by men? Racism is a terrible problem but sexism is the greatest problem on earth. If and when brotherhood of all races reigns worldwide will they then address the issue of sexism and concede their ignominy against females? Ever since savage and envious men destroyed people's beliefs in goddesses, honor of their queens and motherhood and murdered creative femininity's rightful roles on earth, every evil and destruction has ruled in its stead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as head of California's political ethics agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Jodi Remke, presiding judge of the State Bar Court of California, is Brown's choice for chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. Her appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel moved to the Federal Elections Commission. Good-government activists including Robert Stern, a former general counsel for the California agency and a coauthor of the state Political Reform Act, said they knew nothing about Remke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1994
Tom Hayden is absolutely correct (Column Left, Dec. 30). "An increasingly angry public will not be stilled." Politicians, employing technical legalisms, have won this round and deprived us of our vote in favor of campaign finance reform. It's only business as usual when politicians make themselves look ridiculous, but this time the joke also impugns the once-prestigious California Supreme Court. Since the court's reputation for fair-mindedness is the very basis of its authority, suddenly the question of money's effect on the judicial process has become urgent.
NEWS
September 12, 1988
A court-imposed freeze on a strike that would halt Bay Area Rapid Transit commuter trains between San Francisco and the East Bay will expire Tuesday with little progress reported in talks. But leaders of two unions poised to strike have indicated a willingness to keep talking for another week rather than walk out and cut service for 200,000 daily passengers.
NEWS
July 3, 1989
A settlement has been reached in a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's program to kill ravens in an effort to protect the desert tortoise, a threatened species. The decline of the tortoise has been hastened by ravens who prey upon thin-shelled juveniles and have multiplied because food sources in the desert have increased. In May, the BLM began killing ravens near Twentynine Palms and in the Desert Tortoise Natural Area preserve near California City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
An employer can be held liable for injuries to a passenger in a company vehicle even though the employer may have warned the driver against carrying riders, the state Supreme Court ruled Monday. The court by a 6-1 vote said an employer can be held responsible if its workers' conduct could be reasonably anticipated, even if that conduct is a technical violation of company rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawsuits accusing El Paso Corp. and Sempra Energy of conspiring to eliminate competition and raise prices in California's natural gas market will be returned to state courts, a federal judge ruled. The suits claim Southern California Gas and San Diego Gas--now Sempra--met secretly in 1996 with El Paso Natural Gas, agreeing not to compete in the Southern California and Baja California, Mexico, markets.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will the tobacco industry face a tsunami of lawsuits in California, and the risk of billions of dollars in liability? Or will high court rulings eliminate the threat, making the hostility of jurors irrelevant? Three consecutive mega-verdicts against cigarette makers have put California in the forefront of the legal war over smoking. The first of them--a $26.5-million damages award against Philip Morris Inc.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration on Friday delayed a decision on the construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, citing a Nebraska state court decision that invalidated part of the project's route. The latest hold-up in the unusually lengthy review of the $5.3-billion oil pipeline almost certainly will push any decision until after the November midterm election, getting President Obama off a political hook. The White House has been pressed on one side by environmentalists who have turned opposition to the pipeline into a touchstone issue and on the other by conservative Democrats from energy-producing states who say approving Keystone XL would show the administration's commitment to job creation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- The California Supreme Court appeared inclined during a hearing Tuesday to favor a ruling that the public has the right to know the names of police officers involved in shootings. During oral arguments, most members of the state high court seemed skeptical of contentions by police agencies that officer names must be kept secret because disclosure could jeopardize officer safety and involve protected police personnel matters. Chief Justice Tani Cantil - Sakauye , whose husband is a retired police lieutenant, suggested that the California Public Records Act contains a presumption in favor of disclosure and does not provide for blanket exemptions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court appeared to be headed toward a ruling Tuesday in favor of requiring police agencies to make public the names of officers involved in shootings. During a hearing, members of the state high court suggested that the California Public Records Act favors disclosure and questioned how police could justify secrecy when officers shoot people on the job. The court is considering a case in which the city of Long Beach and the Long Beach Police Officers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Jessica Manosa was 20 when she decided to throw a party at an unoccupied rental home her parents owned - without their permission. Word of the bash in Diamond Bar spread by text message, and many who showed up did not even know Manosa, according to court records. They drank liquor, danced and got drunk. One of the partygoers was asked to leave after he began dropping his pants while dancing. As he drove away, he ran over another inebriated guest, a 19-year-old student, killing him. Now the grieving family wants to hold Manosa - via her parents and their homeowners insurance - liable for his death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Justice Joyce L. Kennard, a Republican appointee who forged a largely liberal path on the California Supreme Court, announced Tuesday she will retire April 5, giving Gov. Jerry Brown another chance to put his mark on the state's highest court. Kennard, 72, is the court's longest-serving justice, with a 25-year tenure. She has been regarded as a highly independent judge, often siding with the underdog. Though she owed her place on the top court to former Gov. George Deukmejian, a law-and-order conservative, she bucked expectations and sided so often with the late liberal Justice Stanley Mosk that the pair was dubbed "the odd couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A former journalist who fabricated magazine articles lost a years-long bid to become a lawyer Monday in a court ruling that faulted his character and a failure to atone for his prior misconduct. In a unanimous decision, the California Supreme Court said Stephen R. Glass must be denied a law license not only because he deceived readers and editors as a journalist but because he failed to be completely candid in later years about his transgressions. Glass' deceit was "motivated by professional ambition, betrayed a vicious, mean spirit and a complete lack of compassion for others, along with arrogance and prejudice against various ethnic groups," the court said in an unsigned ruling.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Independent distributors filed a lawsuit in California state court accusing Usana Health Sciences Inc. of fraud and deception, the latest public relations blow for the marketer of vitamins and nutritional supplements. The lawsuit, which seeks class-action status, was filed on behalf of hundreds of low-level distributors in California, which has tough multilevel marketing laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Gov. Jerry Brown's administration Friday asked the California Supreme Court to block two trial court rulings that could indefinitely delay construction of a high-speed rail line linking Los Angeles and San Francisco. The California High-Speed Rail Authority asked the state high court to block by March 1 two rulings by Sacramento Superior Court Judge Michael Kenny that would impede the state's ability to finance the bullet train in the near future. Unless the state Supreme Court intervenes, "the future of the rail system may effectively be determined by two Superior Court rulings untethered from the law approved by the Legislature and the voters to build it," lawyers for the state wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel and Adolfo Flores
The Orange County district attorney's office will ask the state Supreme Court to review the recent decisions of an appellate court that found that state law trumps local regulations banning sex offenders from parks and beaches. In 2011 and 2012, Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas and his staff successfully lobbied the county and more than a dozen cities to adopt the restrictions against sex offenders. But the rules, which required sex offenders to obtain written permission from a law enforcement official in order to be exempted, soon faced legal challenges and local law enforcement stopped enforcing them.
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