Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStates Federal Aid
IN THE NEWS

States Federal Aid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, supporting the move toward a national minimum drinking age, ruled Tuesday that Congress may reduce federal highway funds to states that refuse to raise their drinking age to 21. The court, stepping into a contentious clash between states' rights and congressional authority, concluded on a 7-2 vote that Congress has broad power to set standards for the spending of federal funds.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Gray Davis declared parts of southern Los Angeles County a disaster area on Friday, while donations and other relief began rolling in for those whose homes and businesses were damaged in Wednesday night's freak rain and hail storm. The disaster designation applies to Watts, South Gate and Compton. It will enable storm victims to apply for low-interest loans and other state and federal assistance.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 1, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Thursday upheld the right of the federal government to impose a 55-m.p.h. speed limit on highways by threatening to withhold highway construction money from states. In a unanimous opinion on the first challenge to the national speed limit, the court spurned claims by the state of Nevada that the federal government was using unfair coercion to get states to comply with the law.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rushing to dress up its resume on gun control before the one-year anniversary of the Columbine High School shootings, the House on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved legislation that would provide $100 million to states that impose mandatory prison terms on gun-toting criminals.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and other states would be free to shed federal controls on school spending in exchange for signing a five-year agreement to improve student achievement under legislation announced Tuesday by Republican leaders in Congress. The plan to create "charter states"--stealing a page from the popular concept of regulation-free charter schools--is the GOP's answer to President Clinton's call earlier this year to reshape the federal role in education.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration has declared more than 1,000 American counties and cities with high unemployment rates to be at least temporarily exempt from one of the first of the welfare reforms enacted by Congress--a cutoff of food stamps to unemployed adults who are able-bodied and childless. As a result, close to 1 million food stamp recipients in California and 40 other states have reprieves from the prospect of losing a significant source of their income.
NEWS
February 6, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the early weeks of the 104th Congress, governors such as Connecticut's John Rowland have formed the principal cheering section for the sweeping initiatives of the new Republican majority on Capitol Hill. Rowland, for six years a Republican congressman himself, roared his approval when his former colleagues placed tough limits on "unfunded federal mandates"--federal programs that require action by the states but give them no money to carry them out.
NEWS
February 2, 1995
Here is how members of the California delegation voted on the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act, which passed the House, 360 to 74.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) proposed a multibillion-dollar plan Friday under which the federal government would fully reimburse states for providing emergency medical care to illegal immigrants. California, which has an estimated half of the nation's illegal immigrants, could receive more than $400 million a year under the plan outlined by Gingrich at an airport news conference. The Speaker said the proposal could cost the federal government up to $6 billion nationwide over seven years.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | DAN MORGAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
There would be sharp differences in the amount of new federal money going to individual states under President Clinton's health care plan, and states that are now the most restrictive in granting medical assistance to the poor generally would be the biggest winners, according to a study released today.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Rewarding states in which welfare recipients found and kept jobs, President Clinton distributed $200 million in bonus money Saturday to 27 states for doing more than simply cutting welfare rolls. California, in large part because of its sheer size, received $45 million of the total. Clinton further refined what it means to succeed in welfare reform, saying that next year's bonuses will also reward states that get medical benefits and food stamps to low-income families.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas Gov. George W. Bush, clarifying comments he made last week, said Wednesday the federal government should reimburse California and other states for the costs they incur from illegal immigration. Although the Republican presidential front-runner said last Thursday that he opposes such reimbursements, Bush's campaign said that he misunderstood a reporter's question and that his answer does not signal a change in his position nor a contradiction of the policies of the state he governs.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and other states would be free to shed federal controls on school spending in exchange for signing a five-year agreement to improve student achievement under legislation announced Tuesday by Republican leaders in Congress. The plan to create "charter states"--stealing a page from the popular concept of regulation-free charter schools--is the GOP's answer to President Clinton's call earlier this year to reshape the federal role in education.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has decided to distribute $1 billion in federal bonuses to states that are most successful in moving welfare recipients into jobs and keeping them there. The guidelines spell out for the first time precisely what the states must do to compete for the coveted "performance bonuses" created by 1996 welfare legislation.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Senate unanimously passed a six-month highway bill late Friday that allows states to continue billions of dollars in road projects. But the measure differed significantly from one passed by the House, and it was unclear whether the two could be resolved before Congress adjourns for the year. Without such a compromise bill for President Clinton to sign, highway and transit construction programs in some states might grind to a halt. "We must do something . . .
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State lawmakers will take up one of the most critical needs in the nation's health care system today when Gov. Pete Wilson rolls out a $478-million plan for expanding medical insurance to children of the working poor. Democratic leaders predict that the governor's outline will trigger a landmark debate aimed at helping hundreds of thousands of children who now risk serious and lifelong disabilities when they acquire many easily treatable maladies.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under increasing pressure from states that are severely affected by illegal immigration, the Clinton Administration asked Congress for $350 million Friday to help California and other states pay the prison costs for illegal immigrants convicted of felonies. The amount the Administration seeks is only a fraction of those costs, but the action is significant because it is the first time the federal government has demonstrated any obligation to reimburse states for such expenses.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State lawmakers will take up one of the most critical needs in the nation's health care system today when Gov. Pete Wilson rolls out a $478-million plan for expanding medical insurance to children of the working poor. Democratic leaders predict that the governor's outline will trigger a landmark debate aimed at helping hundreds of thousands of children who now risk serious and lifelong disabilities when they acquire many easily treatable maladies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1997 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to Mayor Richard Riordan's call for aggressive efforts to protect and help children, his handpicked Commission for Healthy Kids on Tuesday joined a growing statewide debate over how to provide medical insurance to 1.6 million uninsured young people in California.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest expansion of health care for children since Medicaid's creation in 1965, Uncle Sam is about to hand the states $24 billion to cover up to half of America's 10-million uninsured kids. But most states are already a step or two ahead of Washington. Using a variety of approaches, most notably broadening Medicaid eligibility, nearly every state, including California, has extended coverage to children of working but low-income families in recent years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|