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BUSINESS
April 6, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A sign of things to come. When Los Angeles County borrowed money last October by issuing short-term taxable notes, one of the underwriters--pledging to efficiently handle the sale of $150 million worth of notes to investors--was Nomura Securities, the Tokyo-based brokerage firm. The presence of Nomura's U.S. branch among the securities firms involved in the county's financing was no coincidence, but part of a long-range plan to build a market among Japanese investors for the bonds of U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State authorities Thursday imposed $40,000 in fines against Sen. Tom Berryhill (R-Modesto) and two GOP committees after finding that the lawmaker laundered that amount of political money into his brother's 2008 Assembly campaign. The state Fair Political Practices Commission voted unanimously to uphold an administrative law judge's ruling that Berryhill committed a "serious and deliberate" violation of California's campaign finance laws. The commissioners decided in a 20-minute closed session to include in the fines the Stanislaus County and San Joaquin County Republican central committees for their role as conduits in passing $40,000 from Berryhill to his brother's successful campaign.
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NEWS
November 11, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Negotiators for cigarette makers and state attorneys general are working out the final details of a $200-billion agreement to settle 36 state lawsuits against the tobacco industry, according to several sources close to the talks. California would receive about $23 billion over 25 years as its share of what would be the largest civil settlement in U.S. history. The proposed deal may be announced to the public as early as Monday at a news conference in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
The state's political ethics watchdog has opened an investigation into the finances of a political action committee founded by gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly, according to a report published Friday evening by the Sacramento Bee.‎ The California Patriots PAC, designed to promote conservative candidates, has not filed financial disclosure statements since October 2012, according to the Fair Political Practices Commission. Donnelly disputes this, telling the Bee that the reports were filed and new copies were sent to the FPPC on Thursday.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House and congressional Democrats are waging a last-minute fight against Republicans and state lawmakers to ensure that states spend some of the billions of dollars they are scheduled to get from cigarette manufacturers on smoking prevention and other social programs. Some Republicans are proposing that a provision be added to a federal spending bill that would give the states a blank check to spend the tobacco money as they see fit.
NEWS
June 24, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Against the awesome profile of the Tetons, one of America's natural treasures, attorneys general from all 50 states Monday began considering how to divvy up an extraordinary treasure of a different kind: the roughly $300 billion that cigarette makers would pay in legal settlements to the states under the sweeping tobacco accord. The annual meeting of the National Assn.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's governors, meeting in Washington, expressed bipartisan concern Saturday about cutbacks in benefits for legal immigrants under last year's welfare reform legislation, but Republicans immediately began backing away from efforts to push Congress hard to change the law. GOP governors participating in a four-day meeting of the National Governors' Assn. later passed a resolution opposing any major changes in the welfare reform law.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
California Moves Up in States Survey: California is now the 42nd-best managed state in the nation, up from the worst in 1993, according to the latest rankings from Financial World magazine. The publication said Utah is the best-run and that New York ranks last. The magazine graded the 50 states on a scale of A through F in three categories: financial management, managing for results, and infrastructure maintenance.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Call it "reform" or simply "cutbacks," but when two governors from opposite sides of the country and the political world sit across the table from each other and agree that welfare needs an overhaul, it is evidence that a national trend may be developing. Republican Gov. Pete Wilson of California and Democratic Gov. James J. Florio of New Jersey did just that at the annual winter conference of governors, which ended Tuesday.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1992
Kemper Securities has ranked California 51st in its quarterly analysis of 50 states and the District of Columbia. The survey looked at economic growth, home sales, mortgage delinquencies, mortgage foreclosures and jobless rates. Scores range from a possible low of -100 to a high of 100. Overall, the survey confirmed a "modest recovery" based on the confusing messages of the U.S. economy.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jon Healey
California Secretary of State Debra Bowen is resisting a push by activists and journalists for better disclosure of campaign finance data, arguing in essence that it would cost too much to comply. It's a surprising stance from Bowen, whose office has fought to make more information about donors available to California voters. It also strains credulity. At issue is a request by MapLight California, California Common Cause and 10 others, including this newspaper, for a downloadable version of the campaign finance data that the secretary of state collects.
OPINION
January 13, 2013
Two months ago, the state's legislative analyst delivered a familiar warning: The budget that the Legislature had approved in June, which was supposed to include a $948-million surplus, was actually heading toward a $1-billion shortfall because of lower-than-expected revenue and higher costs. It was the same kind of message the Legislative Analyst's Office has delivered midway through every fiscal year since the housing market collapsed in 2007 - a sure sign that budgets held together by chewing gum and baling wire were coming apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation Monday to bar protests near funerals, prevent future accounting scandals and provide some legal amnesty to people seeking medical help for drug overdoses. The measure protecting funerals says protesters on public property must be at least 300 feet from the burial site. Violators could be fined $1,000 or jailed for six months. The restrictions are a response to protests by the Kansas-based Westboro Baptist Church, whose members have picketed military funerals to say the death of soldiers is punishment for the country's tolerance of homosexuality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Gov. Jerry Brown is testy. He's defensive. He's very frustrated. He's only human, after all - not a demigod, not the all-wise, powerful supergov he portrayed himself to be when running for the office. It's hard to know who believed that portrayal the most: the voters, the Sacramento insiders or the candidate himself. Regardless, it hasn't panned out the way most people had hoped, and certainly not the way Brown had envisioned. So on Monday, he was in the governor's press conference room - built by his father, incidentally - trying to explain why the state budget hole had grown 71% deeper since January, expanding from $9.2 billion to $15.7 billion.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2011 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
  President Obama and the nation's governors will meet Monday at the White House amid worries by state executives that Washington's budget battles could damage a fragile U.S. economic recovery. Financially strapped state governments are heading off a cliff this year when more than $150 billion in federal stimulus money runs out, said Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire, chairman of the National Governors Assn. States have used most of the money to keep teachers on the job, fund healthcare for the poor and balance their budgets over the last two years.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Mindy Benham knows how to pinch a penny. That's why the Costa Mesa resident does a lot of her shopping on the Internet. She particularly favors Amazon.com Inc. because the giant e-retailer doesn't collect California state sales taxes on her purchases. "There's something about Milwaukee, where I'm from, that people take pride in how little they pay for something," said Benham, a magazine art director, who recently bought a pair of eyeglasses and a sofa online. "I don't want to pay taxes on something if I don't have to pay taxes.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | From United Press International
A General Accounting Office official said Friday that a more equitable formula for distributing federal Medicaid dollars to states would result in 30 states losing money but 19 needier states receiving more funds. The funding formula for Medicaid, the government's health insurance plan for the poor, is unfair because it is based on states' per capita income, Janet Shikles of the GAO told a House Government Operations subcommittee.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Bush claimed progress Monday in the war on drugs and asked a group of state attorneys general for suggestions on how to do better. Some suggested that he send more money. Bush agreed that there is a need for additional federal support but blamed Congress for dragging its feet on his anti-crime and anti-drug efforts. "We've gotten some of what we've asked for--new agents, new prosecutors, new prison space. . . . But I must confess to a certain frustration," he said.
OPINION
August 21, 2010
State Treasurer Bill Lockyer has been grumbling all year about Wall Street sharpies betting billions that California will default on its bonds. His concern is that the burgeoning market for credit default swaps tied to California's debt will make investors less bullish on California's future, forcing the state to offer its bonds at higher interest rates. Higher rates mean higher cost, which the state can scarcely afford. Wall Street is an easy target. A harder truth, though, is that the demand for credit default swaps is just a symptom of the state's sorry finances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
California voters went to the polls Tuesday and recast future elections in the state by passing a ballot measure that creates open primaries, one of five propositions on the ballot. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who championed the open-primary measure called its passage a "historic change" that "sends a clear message that Californians are tired of partisan gridlock and dysfunction." At the same time, voters rejected an experiment in state-financed political campaigns, while tax breaks for buildings retrofitted for earthquake safety passed by a wide margin.
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