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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Herb Semmel, a longtime civil rights attorney who filed the first successful administrative complaint under the Americans With Disabilities Act, died Thursday at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles after a yearlong battle with cancer. He was 73.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 1994 | DAVID E. KALISH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gambling with $5 million was just about the last thing on Jon Elam's mind. So the administrator of Maple Grove, Minn., seeking to invest the money until it was needed for street repairs, chose what seemed like a safe bet: a top-rated mutual fund that held only government-backed securities and that was pitched as ideal for everyone from municipalities to retirees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications. and
On one of those newly released Nixon tapes, which give one the feeling of gazing up a rat's nostril, we find the President fretting that government officials were insufficiently zealous in combatting security leaks. Nixon: "You remember the meeting we had here when I told that group of clowns that we had around here, Renchler and that group? What was his name?" Aide: "Rehnquist." Nixon: "Oh, Rehnquist." That exchange occurred on July 24, 1971.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators said Tuesday that the residential real estate market is improving in most of the nation but the slump in commercial property is worsening in some areas, suggesting that there could be more bank and thrift failures as more loans go bad.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with $1 million in federal research money, a group of UC Riverside scientists will begin this month to tackle a curious but bedeviling problem for national monuments, parks and wilderness areas across the West: smog. Seen as an urban problem, pockets of smog and haze also plague remote, otherwise scenic spots that are protected by the federal government, from Joshua Tree National Park and the Grand Canyon to Yosemite's stark and breathtaking Half Dome.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica A. Levinson
Thank you, Supreme Court. Before your decision Wednesday in McCutcheon vs. FEC, Americans were confined to giving a measly total of $48,600 in campaign contributions to federal candidates (enough for about nine candidates) and a total of $74,600 to political action committees. That means individuals were subject to aggregate contributions limits totaling a mere $123,200. Of course, individuals could, and still can, give unlimited sums to independent groups, such as so-called super PACs and other nonprofit corporations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Easy-to-use cameras and passenger train travel were born at the same time. Around the middle of the 19th century, these modern inventions compelled people to live a little faster and go a little farther than they used to. Traveling three times the speed of horses and buggies, early steam-driven trains caused the distances between cities to shrink. Likewise, photographs brought faraway places into people's homes. They also defied time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1986 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
"Get the Constitution in the background," Lynne V. Cheney suggested with a smile to the photographer. The petite blond chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, who wields a rapier-sharp sense of humor, pointed to the framed parchment above her desk. A trio of parchments came with the office. They were there before her arrival five months ago, before her presidential appointment and congressional approval. "I certainly would never take them down," Cheney added with reverence, ". .
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Mint, by sparking a boom in coin collecting, is making a mint. Thanks largely to the popularity of the Mint's state-themed quarter program--adding tens of millions of Americans into coin collecting--the government agency posted a $2.6-billion profit in fiscal 2000. That money goes to fund government programs and reduce the national debt.
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