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NEWS
January 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Starting today, new state laws impose harsher penalties on drunk drivers, allow certain convicts to serve sentences at home and increase AIDS testing. A new statute in Rhode Island requires AIDS testing of convicts and testing of prostitutes and intravenous drug users who are arrested. The state will also offer voluntary acquired immune deficiency syndrome tests, for example, to hospital patients, marriage license applicants and prenatal-care patients.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State authorities Thursday imposed $40,000 in fines against Sen. Tom Berryhill (R-Modesto) and two GOP committees after finding that the lawmaker laundered that amount of political money into his brother's 2008 Assembly campaign. The state Fair Political Practices Commission voted unanimously to uphold an administrative law judge's ruling that Berryhill committed a "serious and deliberate" violation of California's campaign finance laws. The commissioners decided in a 20-minute closed session to include in the fines the Stanislaus County and San Joaquin County Republican central committees for their role as conduits in passing $40,000 from Berryhill to his brother's successful campaign.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2000
Re "High Court Limits Visitation Rights of Grandparents," June 6. Grandparent visitation is a multifaceted and complex issue. In order to address serious issues such as child abuse and neglect, laws were quickly and often shoddily written. The intent was good, but the results could be disastrous if this Supreme Court decision affects the states' laws. There are cases where grandparents are merely trying to manipulate the parents because they don't like or agree with the way the parents are raising the children.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Even as the United States continues its historic move toward fairness and equity for gay people, antiquated anti-sodomy laws remain on the books in a dozen states. Theoretically, these laws were rendered unenforceable by the Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence vs. Texas, but apparently not everyone has received that message. In the Lawrence case, the court declared that state laws banning consensual same-sex relations were unconstitutional. Yet somehow, between 2011 and 2014, 12 men were arrested in East Baton Rouge Parish in Louisiana under the state's remaining anti-sodomy laws.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're a teenager in Tennessee and have the urge to get, say, your navel pierced this weekend, you'll need to bring along your mom or dad. In Indiana, if you're planning to punch a hole in anything other than your ears, you'll need a note from your parents. You'll need a letter from the parents too if you want to cruise out with your friends in any one of hundreds of American communities after dark this evening.
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Arizonans do not always look fondly on The Greyhound Corp. It has battled unions, sold off its bus lines and 18 other businesses and has been criticized for skimping on charitable contributions. Yet, when John W. Teets, Greyhound's tough-talking chief executive, in July asked the state's lawmakers to enact emergency measures to protect the Phoenix company from takeovers, the Arizona Legislature fairly snapped to attention.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of the death penalty, having failed in a decade-long court challenge to capital punishment, said Wednesday that they will take their pleas back to state legislatures. Organizations that include Amnesty International, the American Civil Liberties Union and the NAACP plan to announce an "abolition" campaign in Washington today, hoping to arouse moral outrage over what they view as the barbaric and outdated practice of executing criminals.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
His sight failing from diabetes, Joseph V. Juliano underwent delicate eye surgery in early 1984 and, like countless other workers covered by group health plans, sent the bills to his employer's insurance company. But the company refused the claim, finding that Juliano's surgery stemmed from a condition that existed before he was covered by the plan. He then brought suit against the insurer and his employer, seeking punitive damages for their "bad-faith" refusal to pay him benefits.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writer
States, emboldened by the Supreme Court's landmark decision Tuesday upholding Indiana's anti-takeover rules, have begun moving quickly to strengthen laws that would stymie hostile raids on corporations. Delaware on Wednesday became the first to follow Indiana's lead, with the state administration declaring that it will ask its Legislature immediately to enact a tougher corporate takeover law.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | Times researchers D'Jamila Salem and Stephanie Grace
Here is how governors and state legislatures stand on abortion, according to the National Abortion Rights Action League, a group favoring the right to abortion. It is based on a review of legislation and on surveys. The National Right to Life Committee does not approve of such assessments, saying the issue is too complicated. But a spokesman for the most part did not dispute their findings. Anti-abortion: Governor and legislature both oppose abortion or want access to abortion restricted.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court next week will consider for the first time whether states may enforce laws that make it a crime to knowingly publish false statements about political candidates. The justices will hear an antiabortion group's free-speech challenge to an Ohio law that was invoked in 2010 by then-Rep. Steve Driehaus, a Democrat. He had voted for President Obama's healthcare law and was facing a tough race for reelection. The antiabortion group Susan B. Anthony List launched a campaign to unseat Driehaus, preparing to run billboard ads saying, "Shame on Steve Driehaus!
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
California victims of alleged foreclosure abuses will get $268 million in relief from a $2.1-billion national settlement with Ocwen Financial Corp., the nation's largest non-bank provider of mortgage customer service. Ocwen broke state law by improperly denying loan modifications, failing to honor modifications granted by prior servicers and charging unauthorized fees, according to the California Department of Business Oversight. "Californians should not lose their homes because of deceptive and poorly executed mortgage servicing practices," Commissioner of Business Oversight Jan Lynn Owen said Monday in a news release.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker and Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer announced Wednesday she would not seek a third term, forgoing a campaign that would have required her to challenge the state's term limits measure. The Republican had left open the option of running this year, despite the overwhelming weight of legal opinion against it. She became governor in 2009 when Democrat Janet Napolitano left office to join President Obama's Cabinet, and Brewer won reelection the following year. The state limits governors to two terms, and most legal experts said her first partial term counted toward the limit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Almost as soon as Matthew Hoff turned 18 and aged out of the mental health programs he'd been enrolled in since childhood, he was out on the streets and in and out of jail. His parents tried to get him back into treatment for bipolar and other brain disorders he suffers, but the young man wasn't cooperative and he wasn't considered dangerous or gravely disabled. So they stood by helplessly as their son faded from their reach. Less than a year later, Hoff walked into a Buena Park bank with a robbery note and left with a handful of cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A panel of California appeals court judges found Friday that state law trumps Orange County's regulations on sex offenders that ban them from parks and beaches. The decision by the 4th District Court of Appeal reverses the conviction of Hugo Godinez, a registered sex offender who was convicted of a misdemeanor for violating the county ordinance after he went to a company picnic at Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley in 2011. Godinez had been convicted of misdemeanor sexual battery in 2010.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In striking down capital punishment laws as unconstitutionally cruel and unusual 18 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the statutes were being arbitrarily and capriciously enforced. As a practical matter, only one in 100 killers was--and still is--being chosen to die. For the late Justice Potter Stewart, figuring out which one was about as easy as predicting who was going to be "struck by lightning."
BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | Associated Press
A coalition including consumer activist Ralph Nader announced it will work to overturn or block "veggie libel" laws like the one Texas cattlemen used to sue Oprah Winfrey. The new Foodspeak Coalition said laws in 13 states and pending in many others are intended to muzzle public debate on food safety and protect food industry and agribusiness profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By David Zahniser
A judge has dealt a serious setback to Los Angeles' efforts to bring larger development to parts of Hollywood, saying a new zoning plan is "fatally flawed" and should be rescinded by the City Council. In a 41-page tentative ruling issued this week, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Allan J. Goodman said city leaders failed to comply with the state's environmental law when they approved an update to the Hollywood Community Plan, which maps out rules for growth and development.
OPINION
November 21, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's disappointing that the Supreme Court denied a request to temporarily block an onerous new abortion law in Texas from taking effect while a federal appellate court determines whether the law is constitutional. The high court's decision could force as many as a third of the abortion clinics in Texas to close, creating a hardship for thousands of women seeking to terminate their pregnancies. The Supreme Court's decision was the wrong one. Now supporters of abortion rights must turn their attention back to the appellate court, which we hope will declare the underlying law unconstitutional.
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