Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStates Politics
IN THE NEWS

States Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No freshman senator arrived on Capitol Hill in 1993 more obsessed than Dirk Kempthorne. No matter what the issue, the Idaho Republican had but one mantra: Return power to the states. That's precisely what the GOP-controlled Congress has been doing on an array of matters. And now a small but growing number of senators and representatives are seriously eyeing the prospect of returning home to run for governor in 1998, with Kempthorne leading the charge.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as head of California's political ethics agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Jodi Remke, presiding judge of the State Bar Court of California, is Brown's choice for chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. Her appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel moved to the Federal Elections Commission. Good-government activists including Robert Stern, a former general counsel for the California agency and a coauthor of the state Political Reform Act, said they knew nothing about Remke.
Advertisement
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "Sacramento's sickness," Editorial, March 28 Banning state lawmakers from raising money during the Legislature's session is a Band-Aid that would create an uneven playing field, where opponents could raise unlimited funds while an incumbent's hands were tied. It would also make matters worse by driving special interests to fund independent expenditure committees to work on behalf of legislators who were prohibited from accepting contributions. It also is unworkable: A legislator who wanted to run for another office would be unable to amass the funds to do so. And perhaps the worst effect: It would force incumbents into a month of frantic fundraising before ballots are mailed, exactly when they should be attending candidate debates and interacting with voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Raising the stakes in his campaign to strengthen California's finances, Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday called a special session of the state Legislature for next week to consider a new plan to save money and pay off state debt, an election-year pitch that he must make to lawmakers without the benefit of a Democratic supermajority. Brown's proposal is aimed at cushioning the state against recessions and calming its turbulent fiscal waters. It would require Sacramento to capture spikes in revenue and either save the money to prevent budget cuts during a downturn or pay off debt and cover long-term liabilities such as public pensions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
The 1998 campaign for governor of California finally took on some focus Wednesday as the four major candidates came together for the first time to discuss critical issues facing the state. At last, the three Democrats and one Republican left their cocoons--the totally controlled paid television commercials that have dominated the campaign up to now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1986
I'm beginning to wonder whether Deukmejian is running against Bradley or against Rose Bird. S. DELL SCOTT Sherman Oaks
NEWS
April 21, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal investigators tracing the movement of hundreds of thousands of dollars from mainland China into California banks suspect the money came directly from the Communist government and went partially to the campaigns of California politicians, Newsweek magazine reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy
Ed Roski Jr., the L.A. County billionaire who got state legislators to exempt his proposed NFL stadium from environmental laws, has showered the lawmakers with tens of thousands of dollars in campaign cash. The money is part of $505,000 that Roski put into California political campaigns during the second half of 2009, including $300,000 toward a proposed ballot measure that would change term limits for future legislators. The contributions are significantly higher than in the previous six months, when Roski doled out $49,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The indictments against state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon and former Assemblyman Tom Calderon struck a severe blow to a political family that has held sway from the Capitol to the San Gabriel Valley for three decades - and hoped to extend its influence with this year's elections. The Calderon name has been strong currency in Sacramento since the 1982 election of Charles Calderon, the brother of the indicted siblings, to the state Assembly. He rose to become Senate Majority Leader in the 1990s and has a son in the Legislature now: Assemblyman Ian Calderon (D-Whittier)
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "Sacramento's sickness," Editorial, March 28 Banning state lawmakers from raising money during the Legislature's session is a Band-Aid that would create an uneven playing field, where opponents could raise unlimited funds while an incumbent's hands were tied. It would also make matters worse by driving special interests to fund independent expenditure committees to work on behalf of legislators who were prohibited from accepting contributions. It also is unworkable: A legislator who wanted to run for another office would be unable to amass the funds to do so. And perhaps the worst effect: It would force incumbents into a month of frantic fundraising before ballots are mailed, exactly when they should be attending candidate debates and interacting with voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Santa Ana's longtime mayor is under investigation for his relationship with an auto parts business owner, to whom the mayor sold a piece of downtown property and then voted in favor of giving the auto parts store an exclusive city contract. As part of his real estate transaction, Mayor Miguel Pulido also purchased a Westminster home from the auto parts business owner for about $230,000 below fair market value, according to property records. Pulido later sold the home for a $197,000 profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The indictments against state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon and former Assemblyman Tom Calderon struck a severe blow to a political family that has held sway from the Capitol to the San Gabriel Valley for three decades - and hoped to extend its influence with this year's elections. The Calderon name has been strong currency in Sacramento since the 1982 election of Charles Calderon, the brother of the indicted siblings, to the state Assembly. He rose to become Senate Majority Leader in the 1990s and has a son in the Legislature now: Assemblyman Ian Calderon (D-Whittier)
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California's minimum wage is pegged to go up $1 an hour to $9 on July 1 and by another buck in 2016. But that isn't high enough or fast enough for Ron Unz, a Silicon Valley software entrepreneur who has dabbled in state politics over the years. The 52-year-old multimillionaire hopes to put a measure on the November ballot raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour March 1, 2015, and to $12 a year later. Unz said he's confident he will get the needed signatures of 504,760 registered voters by the June deadline.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
Hillary Rodham Clinton returns to California on Friday for a round of speeches and events that underscore the state's significance to her family's political fortunes and the potential presidential campaign she is pondering. From the time four decades ago when she lived in Berkeley with then-boyfriend Bill to the resounding victory in the 2008 California primary that revived her first presidential effort, California has provided support, solace and tens of millions of dollars in campaign cash for the family's pursuits.
OPINION
October 29, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When the sky became the limit for most political spending after the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, the skywatchers like Ann Ravel had to readjust their telescopes. As head of California's Fair Political Practices Commission, she policed the money spent on candidates and initiatives, like a last-minute $11 million that showed up late in the game in 2012 from a shadowy Arizona nonprofit. Last week, the FPPC levied $16 million in penalties on "dark money" players - including that Arizona group - that circumvented state reporting rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - The new look of congressional politics in California is playing out in a district that covers most of San Diego and the suburbs of Poway and Coronado - not normally a region considered a political trend-setter. The 52nd Congressional District race, pitting incumbent Republican Brian Bilbray and Democrat Scott Peters, is competitive, high-spending, and, as a notable San Diegan, the late singer/songwriter Jim Croce, once intoned in a different context, "meaner than a junkyard dog. " The race is competitive because California voters in 2010 stripped the Legislature of the power to draw congressional district lines and gave it to a bipartisan commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - The campaign committee for Proposition 8, a 2008 ballot measure that banned same-sex marriage in California, faces $49,000 in fines for failing to properly report and handle political contributions it received. The fines are proposed by the enforcement staff of the state Fair Political Practices Commission against the campaign committee ProtectMarriage.com - Yes on 8. The staff found that the group had failed to properly file public reports disclosing late contributions and contributions of more than $5,000, as well as for not properly disclosing an anonymous $10,000 contribution.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|