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NEWS
January 12, 2000 | By DAVID G. SAVAGE,
The Supreme Court on Tuesday stripped the nation's 5 million state workers--as well as California's teachers and public school employees--of federal protection against age discrimination. On a 5-4 vote, the court ruled that state agencies, including public colleges, are shielded from lawsuits filed by their workers under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
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BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — Three states have joined a lawsuit challenging a key provision of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law enacted in 2010. The attorneys general of Michigan, Oklahoma and South Carolina argued that the federal government's new power to liquidate large, non-bank financial companies that are on the brink of failure is unconstitutional. "Dodd-Frank gives the U.S. secretary of the Treasury essentially unlimited power — with no judicial or Congressional oversight — to pick winners and losers among creditors when these large financial institutions go bankrupt," Michigan Atty.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | From Reuters
Publishers Clearing House said Tuesday it has agreed to pay $34 million to 26 states to settle all remaining allegations it used deceptive sweepstakes promotions to sell magazines. The agreement comes 10 months after the company, one of the largest U.S. magazine subscription agencies, settled with the other 24 states, including California, and the District of Columbia for $18 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's not an earthquake — yet — but California's political landscape is slowly starting to shake. An independent citizens commission is about to sign off on new, honestly drawn legislative and congressional districts. It marks an end to legislative gerrymandering that protected incumbents and the political status quo. Next year, we'll also begin using a "top two" open primary system that should significantly reduce the influence of polarizing and paralytic partisan politics.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN and ROBERT ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The record $206-billion legal settlement announced Monday between the nation's major cigarette makers and state attorneys general has ended the most pivotal phase of a grueling legal war of attrition that began in 1994 with state lawsuits seeking recovery of tax money spent treating sick smokers. If approved by the states, as expected, the 131-page agreement will eliminate the single greatest legal threat facing the $50-billion-a-year industry.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's cash-hungry cities and counties all but embraced Monday's tentative settlement of lawsuits against the tobacco industry and the riches it promises, but state lawmakers took a more cautious approach to the landmark agreement. Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren, whose deputies helped negotiate the deal, hailed the agreement as a "monumental feat," calling it "the best possible settlement for the state of California."
BUSINESS
August 30, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A working group of attorneys general from several of the 14 states that have filed massive lawsuits against the tobacco industry will attempt to refine and win support for a proposed global settlement of tobacco litigation.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Ten more states Tuesday joined California and six other states in lawsuits accusing the nation's largest insurers of conspiring to put together a liability crisis with crippling effects around the nation. The original suits, filed in U.S. District Court and a state court in March, alleged that the companies collaborated in a secret scheme that limited and eliminated coverage on certain types of general liability insurance.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A draft proposal to grant the tobacco industry partial immunity from lawsuits in exchange for billions of dollars in payments to fund anti-smoking programs, compensate sick smokers and reimburse states for smoking-related health-care costs is under discussion by key congressmen, according to officials and lawyers involved in tobacco litigation.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Buoyed by recent court victories and the demise of tough, anti-smoking legislation in Congress, the tobacco industry finds itself in a surprisingly strong position as it seeks to settle three dozen multibillion-dollar lawsuits filed by state attorneys general. Helpful legal developments, ideal timing, and even the composition of the team negotiating for state attorneys general all seem to be working in the industry's favor.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California won a court order reviving a stalled fraud lawsuit against Alfred J.R. Villalobos, a former board member at the California Public Employees' Retirement System accused of plying pension fund officials with luxury trips and gifts to influence investment decisions. A federal judge said the state's action should not have been shelved when Villalobos filed a bankruptcy petition in June 2010. California can use its police powers to "protect the public safety and welfare" even though Villalobos is seeking protection from creditors under bankruptcy laws, said U.S. District Judge Edward C. Reed in Reno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2010 | By Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
A Bell official said Friday that the city had agreed to the appointment of a monitor to oversee day-to-day functions and finances, a move that may delay a civil lawsuit filed by the state attorney general's office. Jamie Casso, Bell's interim city attorney, will file the motion Monday. He said the city could not take on the legal costs of fighting the state's lawsuit. He said it would be better for the city and other investigative agencies to allow the criminal proceedings against eight current and former city leaders to move forward.
OPINION
October 6, 2010 | By Andres Salazar
Americans often tout the great freedoms that U.S. citizenship grants. But lately I have a hard time seeing it that way. Instead, I find myself toying with renouncing my citizenship. When it comes to my ability to spend my life with the person I love, this country has turned its back on me. I am a dual national. I was born in the United States to an American mother and a Spanish father. I grew up in Spain, although my family frequently jetted across the ocean to maintain bonds with family and friends.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
A U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge was skeptical of the California attorney general's efforts Tuesday to keep on track a civil fraud lawsuit against Alfred J.R. Villalobos, a key go-between in arranging investment deals for state public pension fund money. The state, alleging that he violated state securities and unfair-business laws, had sued Villalobos in May seeking up to $95 million in restitution and penalties. But a month later, Villalobos, a Nevada resident, filed for bankruptcy protection, getting the automatic order that halts other courts from proceeding on existing lawsuits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
The state reached a $335,000 settlement on June 29 with a motorist whose vehicle was rear-ended by former state Sen. Carole Migden (D-San Francisco), said aides to Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown. The crash occurred at the end of what witnesses said was an erratic drive by the ex-lawmaker on Interstate 80. In multiple 911 calls on May 18, 2007, witnesses said Migden was talking on her cellphone, weaving across the road, driving more than 80 miles an hour and hitting a guardrail. After exiting the freeway, she reportedly hit a car stopped at a red light, slightly injuring the driver and a 3-year-old passenger.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2009 | Associated Press
California's attorney general has settled a lawsuit against H&R Block Inc. over a widely used loan program that gives the nation's largest tax preparer a chunk of customers' tax refunds. Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown said Friday that the $4.85-million settlement would stop H&R Block from offering high-cost loans it had marketed as early tax refunds. Former Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer sued H&R Block in 2006, adding California to a long list of others that sued over its "refund anticipation loans."
BUSINESS
April 12, 1997 | Myron Levin
White House Deputy Counsel Bruce R. Lindsey said the Clinton administration is willing to facilitate a global settlement of the mushrooming tobacco litigation if the industry and its foes want its help. But neither side seems "ready to put their cards on the table," Lindsey said in an interview in today's issue of National Journal. "There may come a time when we can weigh in and help move the discussions along, but we aren't there yet," Lindsey said.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was an ingenious, if untested, legal theory--hatched by four old law school friends searching for the "master stroke" that might finally beat the tobacco companies in court. For decades, the companies have been sued by smokers who alleged that cigarettes damaged their health, but the firms never had to pay a dime in damages. Their invincible defense: Smokers had exercised "personal choice" and assumed the risk of health dangers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Four food manufacturers have agreed to reduce levels of a cancer-causing chemical in their potato chips and French fries in a settlement with the state of California. The attorney general's office announced the deals Friday with Heinz, Frito-Lay, Kettle Foods and Lance Inc. The lawsuits were filed under a state law that requires companies to post warnings about carcinogens in their products. The attorney general's office sued the manufacturers and several fast food companies in 2005 because their products contained high levels of acrylamide.
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