Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStatistician
IN THE NEWS

Statistician

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
November 7, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
RENTON, Wash. - A decade ago, Todd Nielson worked part time for the Green Bay Packers at $6 an hour. Now, he's quietly invaluable to the Seattle Seahawks. Nielson gathers and crunches numbers, studies probabilities, looks for any sliver of data concerning the Seahawks or opposing teams that could give Seattle an edge. That includes drawing up statistical reports for Coach Pete Carroll and his assistants, documenting plays and coverages during games, and even analyzing officiating crews for their specific tendencies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 28, 2013
Re "Blurring reality stokes fears," Perspective, Nov. 26 False allegations of widespread anti-white racism are intended to make people indifferent to anti-minority racism. It's a formula. Racists accuse others of racism. High-paid shills for coal or oil accuse scientists of lying for grant money. It looks like "he said, she said. " People give up. The data can help. The black-on-white scaremonger in this article says: "If you use statistics, which I don't, people say you are stereotyping.
Advertisement
OPINION
November 6, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
In the last week or so, an intense kerfuffle broke out over the poll-prognosticator Nate Silver and his blog at the New York Times, FiveThirtyEight . Silver, a statistician, has been predicting a decisive Obama victory for a very long time, based on his very complicated statistical model, which very, very few of his fans or detractors understand. On any given day, Silver might announce that - given the new polling data - "the model" now finds that the president has an 86.3% chance of winning.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
President Obama triumphed on Tuesday. But the biggest winner may have been math. After decades of relying on predictions from political pundits and wildly gyrating polls, Americans saw a small band of number crunchers redefine the business of election forecasting. Armed with computer simulations and confidence in cold hard data, these self-described geeks called the presidential race and a slew of smaller contests with stunning accuracy. Their foresight proved astonishing and provided the political class endless talking points to debate in the weeks leadng up to election day. In the process, these statisticians may have fundamentally changed the way that political campaigns are watched and conducted in America.
SPORTS
June 21, 1986
I am not too familiar with proper business ethics encouraged by the Better Business Bureau, but isn't the Dodger organization being unfaithful to the public when it allows Vin Scully and his two statistician co-workers to end their commercials with "Dodger baseball, the best buy in town!"? I have attended three losing Dodger travesties and I am ready to sue. FRED P. COMES Los Angeles
BUSINESS
June 26, 1988
Boy, have times changed. The romance of the sea and the adventure of the rugged frontier are now just distant, faded memories. In fact, according to "The Jobs Rated Almanac," seaman and cowboy, occupations that were once the backbone of our nation, rank near the bottom of the list in terms of job satisfaction and desirability. ("Book Rates Actuary as No. 1 Job," May 19.) On the other hand, jobs such as actuary, computer programmer and statistician rank at or near the top of the list.
OPINION
January 11, 2006
Re "Dr. Bush's flu flim-flam," Current, Jan. 8 Is a flu pandemic a real danger? Absolutely. Is it inevitable and overdue? Not at all. This is the twisted logic of the ill-informed all-night gambler perched on a stool at the roulette wheel. He tells himself that because double-zero hasn't materialized in the last eight hours, its appearance is now "inevitable and overdue," and he bets accordingly. Nuclear war hasn't occurred since the first atomic bomb went off in 1945. Is it overdue?
OPINION
November 28, 2013
Re "Blurring reality stokes fears," Perspective, Nov. 26 False allegations of widespread anti-white racism are intended to make people indifferent to anti-minority racism. It's a formula. Racists accuse others of racism. High-paid shills for coal or oil accuse scientists of lying for grant money. It looks like "he said, she said. " People give up. The data can help. The black-on-white scaremonger in this article says: "If you use statistics, which I don't, people say you are stereotyping.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By James Rainey
  Sen. Daniel P. Moynihan famously said that people were entitled to their own opinions but not to their own facts. With the news that unemployment slipped under 8% for the first time in about four years, some right-wing ideologues are flailing about for their own facts. In the process, they don't mind slandering the people who produce the nation's jobs numbers. The 7.8% unemployment number doesn't exactly signal a bonanza for Americans, but it's enough of an improvement that supporters of Mitt Romney obviously worry some voters may think that President Obama's stewardship of the economy is finally paying small dividends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
University of Michigan statistician Leslie Kish, who pioneered what is now called margin of error in surveys, died Oct. 7 in Ann Arbor, Mich. He was 90. Kish introduced the idea that non-responses must be counted to produce the most accurate probability sample. His technique was validated in 1948 when he and his colleagues, using a small national sample of fewer than 1,000 U.S. households, found President Harry Truman running slightly ahead of Republican challenger Thomas Dewey.
SPORTS
November 7, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
RENTON, Wash. - A decade ago, Todd Nielson worked part time for the Green Bay Packers at $6 an hour. Now, he's quietly invaluable to the Seattle Seahawks. Nielson gathers and crunches numbers, studies probabilities, looks for any sliver of data concerning the Seahawks or opposing teams that could give Seattle an edge. That includes drawing up statistical reports for Coach Pete Carroll and his assistants, documenting plays and coverages during games, and even analyzing officiating crews for their specific tendencies.
OPINION
November 6, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
In the last week or so, an intense kerfuffle broke out over the poll-prognosticator Nate Silver and his blog at the New York Times, FiveThirtyEight . Silver, a statistician, has been predicting a decisive Obama victory for a very long time, based on his very complicated statistical model, which very, very few of his fans or detractors understand. On any given day, Silver might announce that - given the new polling data - "the model" now finds that the president has an 86.3% chance of winning.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By James Rainey
  Sen. Daniel P. Moynihan famously said that people were entitled to their own opinions but not to their own facts. With the news that unemployment slipped under 8% for the first time in about four years, some right-wing ideologues are flailing about for their own facts. In the process, they don't mind slandering the people who produce the nation's jobs numbers. The 7.8% unemployment number doesn't exactly signal a bonanza for Americans, but it's enough of an improvement that supporters of Mitt Romney obviously worry some voters may think that President Obama's stewardship of the economy is finally paying small dividends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2011 | By Jessica Tobacman, Special to Tribune Newspapers
Paul Meier influenced the field of statistics in two major ways: as a proponent of a method that helped eliminate bias in determining the effectiveness of treatments in clinical trials, and by introducing a system used to estimate survival rates for patients undergoing different treatments in trials. A longtime professor at the University of Chicago, Meier, 87, died Aug. 7 at his home in New York, said his daughter Joan Meier. He had suffered a major stroke more than 10 years ago and had been beset by a series of strokes more recently, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011 | By David Kipen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bill James has revolutionized the way baseball mavens think about the game, but his first love has always been death. Since high school, in addition to demolishing conventional wisdom with his annual "Baseball Abstract," James has apparently been inhaling true-crime books like, well, a maniac. The result, dressed up with the defensively cerebral title "Popular Crime: Reflections on the Celebration of Violence," may just be the hastiest book it ever took a man 20 years to write. "Reflections" is putting matters generously.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
In another indication that recovery from the recession is struggling, U.S. economic growth for the final three months of last year has been revised downward to 2.8% by government statisticians. This amid concerns that turmoil in the Middle East will cause further problems. The Commerce Department had previously estimated that the nation's economic output, or gross domestic product, for the fourth quarter of 2010 had been 3.2%. That figure was a significant improvement over the 2.6% annualized growth rate in the third quarter of the year.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | BURT A. FOLKART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Krier, the venerable follower of films whose figures bespoke box office triumphs and failures and whose personal prognostications could mean life or death in the wildly competitive movie rental market, has died. Krier died Saturday night at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of the complications of age. He was 89. Krier was a veteran leader in an industry in which even expensive productions often fail while low-budget, seemingly hopeless celluloid atrocities stay atop the heap for weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001 | JOHN ORTEGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don H. Potts, one of the world's foremost track and field statisticians and historians, has died. He was 79. Potts died of pneumonia Nov. 1 at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara. He was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in April and had suffered a heart attack in the last few months. Potts, a Seattle native, had an undergraduate degree in physics and a doctorate in mathematics from Caltech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Lawrence Garfinkel, the statistician who overcame his lack of a doctoral degree and training in oncology to become one of the driving forces in demonstrating that smoking causes lung cancer, died Jan. 21 in Seattle. He was 88. The cause of death was cardiovascular disease, according to his son Martin. Garfinkel oversaw the training of thousands of volunteers for the American Cancer Society and helped conduct two of the largest epidemiological studies ever, enrolling more than 2.2 million men and women.
OPINION
January 11, 2006
Re "Dr. Bush's flu flim-flam," Current, Jan. 8 Is a flu pandemic a real danger? Absolutely. Is it inevitable and overdue? Not at all. This is the twisted logic of the ill-informed all-night gambler perched on a stool at the roulette wheel. He tells himself that because double-zero hasn't materialized in the last eight hours, its appearance is now "inevitable and overdue," and he bets accordingly. Nuclear war hasn't occurred since the first atomic bomb went off in 1945. Is it overdue?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|