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OPINION
December 26, 2002
John Balzar ruins an otherwise thoughtful piece by answering his own question ("What's wrong with America?") with meaningless statistical gibberish (Commentary, Dec. 22). He says, "Nearly half of the white population thinks the country is going in the right direction and nearly two-thirds of African Americans see it headed wrong," as if that expressed a meaningful racial dichotomy. Even without discounting for the lack of precision in typical polls, that is "nearly" equivalent to simply saying that between half and two-thirds of both races see the country headed in the wrong direction.
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SPORTS
October 9, 1999
Ross Porter, the Benjamin Franklin of useless statistics, has finally gone off the deep end. During the final Astro-Dodger game of the season, Porter came up with this one: "Larry Dierker will become the first manager in history to reach the playoffs in a season in which he underwent successful brain surgery." Since he has obviously lost it, I thought I'd give Ross some other statistics for him to use next year: Raul Mondesi has become the first player in history to have more public expletives than base hits in a single season.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2007 | Vani Rangachar
When United, US Airways and Northwest flight schedules melted down last month, Joe Brancatelli of JoeSentMe.com (a subscription-only site for business fliers) pointed customers to FlightStats.com, which helps track flights. What's hot: FlightStats aggregates information about flight status and airport delays from hundreds of sources. Historical data can help you to avoid peak delay times when planning a flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.S. Roman Catholicism, the nation's largest religious body that generally has shown steady growth, last year registered the biggest loss ever recorded. But the decline was termed a statistical fluke. It was "caused by different methods of reporting introduced over the last year by some dioceses," said Father Kenneth Doyle, media relations director for the U.S. Catholic Conference in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporting recent claims of racial profiling against Ventura County police agencies, a county public defender found last year that 96% of his clients who were pulled over for a minor auto maintenance infraction and then charged with more serious offenses were black or Latino.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prominent Japanese publisher said Friday that Japan's trade surplus with the United States is not as bad as "outmoded" statistical methods by the U.S. government make it seem. Toshiaki Ogasawara, publisher and chairman of the Japan Times, the oldest English-language newspaper in Japan, said about 30% of Japan's exports to the United States are produced by U.S. subsidiaries in Japan, and that the Japanese government has "no control whatsoever over these types of exports."
NEWS
September 4, 1993 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. economy cruised ahead in the fall, lost power in the winter and clicked back into first gear last spring. No, scratch that. The U.S. economy streaked ahead in the fall, slammed on the brakes after New Year's and picked up modestly in the spring. Or did it, perhaps, do something different altogether? Strangely, no one is quite sure.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The 1988 presidential campaign is about to explore a quadrennial question: Is prosperity for Americans just around the corner, or has it slipped farther away in recent years? Democratic presidential candidate Michael S.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Levine knows all the stories. The gray-haired man talking with his wife over in the corner is a mob lawyer from the Midwest. The stout, mustachioed gentleman opposite him is a Mexican drug lord holding court with his extended family, complete with mournful wife, bored-looking daughter and solicitous son-in-law. Scattered about elsewhere in the linoleum-tiled waiting room on visiting day in the U.S.
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | ED HINTON, TRIBUNE MOTOR SPORTS WRITER
About the Project This is the result of six months of research and reporting by Tribune Auto Race Writer Ed Hinton, with help from staffers at other Tribune papers, among them Darin Esper of the Los Angeles Times. It sheds new light on the decline of traditional fatalism among race drivers and the need for more research and action to prevent the violent deaths the sport has come to accept.
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