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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporting recent claims of racial profiling against Ventura County police agencies, a county public defender found last year that 96% of his clients who were pulled over for a minor auto maintenance infraction and then charged with more serious offenses were black or Latino.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prominent Japanese publisher said Friday that Japan's trade surplus with the United States is not as bad as "outmoded" statistical methods by the U.S. government make it seem. Toshiaki Ogasawara, publisher and chairman of the Japan Times, the oldest English-language newspaper in Japan, said about 30% of Japan's exports to the United States are produced by U.S. subsidiaries in Japan, and that the Japanese government has "no control whatsoever over these types of exports."
NEWS
September 4, 1993 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. economy cruised ahead in the fall, lost power in the winter and clicked back into first gear last spring. No, scratch that. The U.S. economy streaked ahead in the fall, slammed on the brakes after New Year's and picked up modestly in the spring. Or did it, perhaps, do something different altogether? Strangely, no one is quite sure.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The 1988 presidential campaign is about to explore a quadrennial question: Is prosperity for Americans just around the corner, or has it slipped farther away in recent years? Democratic presidential candidate Michael S.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Levine knows all the stories. The gray-haired man talking with his wife over in the corner is a mob lawyer from the Midwest. The stout, mustachioed gentleman opposite him is a Mexican drug lord holding court with his extended family, complete with mournful wife, bored-looking daughter and solicitous son-in-law. Scattered about elsewhere in the linoleum-tiled waiting room on visiting day in the U.S.
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | ED HINTON, TRIBUNE MOTOR SPORTS WRITER
About the Project This is the result of six months of research and reporting by Tribune Auto Race Writer Ed Hinton, with help from staffers at other Tribune papers, among them Darin Esper of the Los Angeles Times. It sheds new light on the decline of traditional fatalism among race drivers and the need for more research and action to prevent the violent deaths the sport has come to accept.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1997
Rarely has The Times published commentary as misinformed and confused as Michael Schrage's "U.S. Should Privatize Economic Statistics" (Times Board of Advisors, July 27). In his thoughtless haste to condemn the federal reporting of statistics as a "virtual monopoly" that indulges in the "idiocy of national aggregation," Mr. Schrage wonders why the government continues to have a role in national econometric statistics that perhaps made sense a century ago but that now, in a global economy, seem outmoded and inefficient.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
When it comes to "quality," more American companies are like symphony orchestras whose musicians and conductors can't read music. The people might be talented and the instruments magnificent, but what you're going to end up with is a lot of noise. America is not going to get a quality revolution until its managers and workers have some grasp of probability and statistics--the lingua franca of quality. Unfortunately, corporate statistical literacy is abysmally low.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Opal Rolph considers herself a smart shopper, so she buys meat only "on special" and passes up many costly snack foods and fruits. But as food prices shot upward last month, Rolph, 81, says she finds it harder to keep her food bill under control. "I just don't buy as much," she said Thursday as she loaded her shopping bags into her car at the Vons' Pavilions store in Monrovia. Her sister and shopping companion, Florence Logsdon, 83, agreed. "We're a lot more choosy now."
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
The percentage of Southern children living in poverty is about the same as it was in 1969, even though most states in the region have robust economies and budget surpluses, the Children's Defense Fund said Monday. "Equally disturbing is the fact that the rest of the nation is catching up with the South," said Marian Wright Edelman, president of the defense fund, a Washington-based nonprofit child advocacy group. In 1996, the West matched the South in the percentage of poor children, 22.
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