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October 8, 1993 | Reuters
The 7 1/2-ton Statue of Freedom will be airlifted back on top of the U.S. Capitol dome on Oct. 23, nearly six months after it was removed for repairs, the Architect of the Capitol's office announced Thursday. The 19 1/2-foot-tall statue of a woman holding a sword and shield was lifted off the dome by helicopter May 9 and placed in a plaza in front of the Capitol for restoration.
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NEWS
October 8, 1993 | Reuters
The 7 1/2-ton Statue of Freedom will be airlifted back on top of the U.S. Capitol dome on Oct. 23, nearly six months after it was removed for repairs, the Architect of the Capitol's office announced Thursday. The 19 1/2-foot-tall statue of a woman holding a sword and shield was lifted off the dome by helicopter May 9 and placed in a plaza in front of the Capitol for restoration.
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NEWS
May 10, 1993 | From Associated Press
When the Statue of Freedom touched down on the Capitol Plaza shortly after dawn Sunday, a worker climbed a ladder, unhitched a web of protective straps and kissed the bronze goddess on the cheek. A crowd of hundreds cheered as a helicopter crew plucked the statue from the U.S. Capitol dome where it has stood guard for 130 years. Bringing the seven-ton, 19-foot 6-inch statue down from its perch 268 feet above the ground took months of planning.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | From Associated Press
When the Statue of Freedom touched down on the Capitol Plaza shortly after dawn Sunday, a worker climbed a ladder, unhitched a web of protective straps and kissed the bronze goddess on the cheek. A crowd of hundreds cheered as a helicopter crew plucked the statue from the U.S. Capitol dome where it has stood guard for 130 years. Bringing the seven-ton, 19-foot 6-inch statue down from its perch 268 feet above the ground took months of planning.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1993 | Associated Press
The National Guard has lost a battle for air supremacy over the Capitol Dome. The Defense Department announced Tuesday that Guard helicopters will not be allowed to lower the Statue of Freedom from its perch atop the dome on May 9. The decision ends a battle between the Guard and a private helicopter company over who will remove the 7 1/2-ton statue, which is to be cleaned and restored for the first time in 130 years.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | DON ALPERT
Commemorative coins continue in the numismatic spotlight with the issuance of a new series honoring the Bicentennial of Congress (1789-1989). The coins (pictured) include a $5 gold piece featuring the Capitol dome; a silver $1 featuring the Statue of Freedom, which sits atop the dome, and a half dollar featuring a bust of the Statue of Freedom. Mintages are limited to a maximum of 1 million $5 gold coins, 3 million $1 silver coins and 4 million half dollars. Other recent U.S. Mint commemoratives include the 1982 coins marking the 250th birthday of George Washington; 1983 and '84 Olympic coins; 1986 Statue of Liberty coins; 1987 Constitutional Bicentennial, and the 1988 Olympic coins.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | Associated Press
A restoration team has completed work on the statue of Armed Freedom that was removed from the dome of the Capitol in May. The seven-ton bronze female warrior has been cleaned and restored and will be returned by helicopter to its regular perch on Oct. 23, said George White, architect of the Capitol. He said the scaffolding that has surrounded the 19-foot, 6-inch statue for the last 3 1/2 months will come down so the public can view it up close before it goes aloft again.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | from Associated Press
Cannon thundered and politicians made speeches as the U.S. Capitol celebrated its bicentennial on Saturday with the return of the statue of Freedom to its place on top of the dome. "Here in sunshine, the emblem of freedom is again in her place," said historian David McCullough at ceremonies marking the laying of the Capitol cornerstone in 1793 and the return of the newly restored, 130-year-old bronze statue.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2007 | Theo Milonopoulos, Times Staff Writer
When Sarah Jean Davidson came to the nation's capital as a teenager at the height of the 1960s civil rights movement, she was unmoved by the historic buildings around her. "When I looked at the Capitol, I had no connection," said Davidson, now the president of a black history group in Arkansas. Little did she know that an ancestor, enslaved in Virginia, may have helped build it. The slaves who helped build the U.S.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | HOWARD LIBIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It takes a lot to get the nation's capital out of bed early on a Sunday morning. But many Washingtonians are expected to arise before sunup this weekend for a chance to witness a spectacular aerial feat, with a dollop of history mixed in. Starting at 6 a.m. Sunday, a huge helicopter is to hover over the Capitol, pluck the Civil War-era statue from atop the dome and, with luck, gingerly deliver it into the hands of a restoration crew.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Statue of Liberty's actual 100th anniversary was celebrated Tuesday with a ceremony designating it a landmark of the world. The simple, one-hour gathering stood in sharp contrast to the Fourth of July extravaganza that was staged in honor of France's gift to America. The four-day bash in July featured a tall ships parade and a fireworks display that drew millions of visitors to New York. Just one brass band played Tuesday on Liberty Island, and Interior Secretary Donald P.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Capitol, one of the nation's most cherished monuments to democracy, could become a symbol of the sorry state of Uncle Sam's checkbook. So warn architect and engineering groups in response to proposed budget cuts for the Capitol's maintenance, including the first major face-lift of the iconic dome in more than 50 years. "The U.S. Capitol is not merely Congress' work space; it is also an attraction for millions of visitors from around the world, a shining example of American architecture - and home to priceless works of art - and a potential target for those who wish to do us harm," the American Institute of Architects, American Society of Civil Engineers and other groups said in a letter this week to congressional leaders.
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