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SPORTS
October 21, 1994 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Receivers don't normally lead the county in interceptions in their first year of playing defense. And 5-foot-10 receivers don't normally catch balls intended for players half a foot taller than them. But Canyon quarterback Adam Hoover has been watching Greg Jacobs do the unexpected since their Pop Warner days. And Hoover has come to understand that nothing Jacobs does on the football field is normal. "He has something you can't coach--something that makes up for his size," Hoover said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 24, 2013 | Chris Dufresne
This is the latest offering in an occasional series: "Things that should keep Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott up at night. " If you started a playoff next month using the top four division champions based on Jeff Sagarin's ratings Sunday in USA Today, Arizona State and Stanford would be in the semifinals. The Sun Devils would play Missouri, or South Carolina, and the Cardinal would meet this week's Alabama/Auburn winner. What a cruel twist it was that, on the Saturday that Oregon's second loss effectively eliminated the Pac-12 from this year's national title race, the league was overall No. 1. The conference got to the summit just in time to be knocked back down BCS Mountain.
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NEWS
June 23, 1990 | SHERRY ANGEL, Sherry Angel is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Clayton Olivier once bumped his forehead in a doorway with such force he knocked himself out. Guy Earl used to shave on his knees to avoid back strain from bending over the bathroom sink. Both are well over six feet tall, and they are among many who live rather uncomfortably in a world structured for people of average size who must strain their necks to establish eye contact with the likes of Olivier and Earl.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
An adversary looms larger and stronger if you're incapacitated or off-balance, according to a study by UCLA anthropologists that places the classic “fight, flight or parley” question in an evolutionary context. The study, part of a series that examines how humans assess potential adversaries, showed that young male participants who were restrained on a chair or who struggled to balance on a board consistently underestimated their own stature and overestimated that of an angry-looking male,  compared with a control group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday abolished a requirement that officers stand at least 5 feet tall to join the LAPD. Department officials requested that the minimum height requirement be eliminated, saying they have found no evidence that shorter people were less capable of performing the duties of a police officer. Furthermore, they said such a requirement exposed the department to potential lawsuits from candidates who were rejected solely because of their height.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986
After working with bride Madonna in "Shanghai Surprise," Sean Penn told the Chi Sun-Times' Roger Ebert: "She is one of the major actresses, ever." Just think of her stature when she makes her third film.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | ROSE APODACA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Height matters. At least it does in fashion, where supermodels--5 feet 10 on average--tower over the catwalks. And it matters in basketball, where 6 feet 6 no longer seems incredible against the 7-foot-7 stature of Washington Wizard Gheorghe Muresan, the NBA's tallest player who filled the role opposite Billy Crystal in the aptly named movie "My Giant." It also matters among the almost 500 members who attended the Tall Club International convention last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Pygmies appear to have unusually low levels of an important protein involved in growth, possibly explaining why they are so short and offering clues to shortness in other groups, researchers reported Wednesday. A study involving 20 African Pygmies found they appear to have very low levels of growth hormone-binding protein, which may be why they fail to experience a growth spurt at puberty. "This is very exciting to me," said Dr.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
At age 12, Jake is 4 feet tall. He is in the unfortunate position of having to look up at least eight inches to face the other boys in his class. He has always been the shortest boy--on his team, in his neighborhood. He knows well what it's like to be the butt of jokes. But now, Jake (not his real name) and his parents are hoping for a change.
SPORTS
February 15, 1998
STORYLINE: Sunday's showdown betwen enighboring nations is the latest in an international hockey rivalry that dates to the 1920s in the Olympics. Series gained stature with surprise U.S. victory in World Cup final in 1996. YEAR BY YEAR; U.S.-CANADA IN THE OLYMPICS 1920 U.S.: Silver Canada: Gold 1924 U.S.: Silver Canada: Gold 1928 U.S.: DNQ* Canada: Gold 1932 U.S.: Silver Canada: Gold 1936 U.S.: Bronze Canada: Silver 1948 U.S.: Bronze (tie) Canada: Gold 1952 U.S.: Silver Canada: Gold 1956 U.S.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — Jamie Dimon again proved himself Wall Street's able frontman in Washington, but his testimony on Capitol Hill may not head off tougher banking regulations following JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s risky trading losses. Dimon, JPMorgan's chairman and chief executive, appeared at ease with lawmakers as he fielded questions — some aggressive, but most deferential — at a Senate Banking Committee hearing Wednesday into the bank's trading losses of more than $2 billion. Although the hearing focused on how JPMorgan sustained the embarrassing loss, the two-hour session veered into larger debates over financial regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Kenneth Price, a prolific Los Angeles artist whose work with glazed and painted clay transformed traditional ceramics while also expanding orthodox definitions of American and European sculpture, died early Friday at his home and studio in Taos, N.M. He was 77. Price had struggled with tongue and throat cancer for several years, his food intake restricted to liquids supplied through a feeding tube. Despite his infirmity, he continued to produce challenging new work and to mount critically acclaimed exhibitions at galleries in Los Angeles, New York and Europe.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2011 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
Jon Huntsman Jr. arrived here from Beijing on Friday to mull a White House bid against the man who made him ambassador to China, a matchup that would offer no shortage of personal drama. But before taking on President Obama, Huntsman would face another loaded showdown — against Mitt Romney, a persistent foil with whom he has long competed for influence and stature. Their race would match a popular former Utah governor (Huntsman) against the state's beloved adopted son (Romney)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Season 10 and "American Idol" finally brought in a couple of pros. Whether new judges Steven Tyler and Jennifer Lopez will find and foster an actual pop star or create the ratings-generating buzz of their predecessors remains to be seen. (Wednesday night's opener was the lowest-rated premiere since its first season and was down 13% compared with last year's, but with an audience of 26.2 million, it easily trounced the competition.) But as soon as they took their seats, it was as if the elephant in the room had finally ambled out of view ?
BUSINESS
October 8, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
In the early weeks of the Obama administration, Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner seemed like the ultimate short-timer. There was the rocky confirmation stemming from his failure to pay some personal income taxes. Then after taking office, Geithner's first major speech on the financial crisis was an unmitigated disaster. The markets shuddered at the dearth of details about his plans to stabilize the financial system, and the Dow Jones industrial average plunged 382 points.
OPINION
September 17, 2010
A single mother of three, survivor of prison torture and exile. A pediatrician, linguist and practiced buster of gender barriers as the first female president of Chile. This is the resume that makes Michelle Bachelet an excellent choice to lead the newly created United Nations agency to promote gender equality around the globe, to be called U.N. Women. With her appointment this week, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has brought some badly needed star power to the world organization in general and to women's issues in particular.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
An adversary looms larger and stronger if you're incapacitated or off-balance, according to a study by UCLA anthropologists that places the classic “fight, flight or parley” question in an evolutionary context. The study, part of a series that examines how humans assess potential adversaries, showed that young male participants who were restrained on a chair or who struggled to balance on a board consistently underestimated their own stature and overestimated that of an angry-looking male,  compared with a control group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. James M. Tanner, a British pediatrician who was among the first to study the growth of adolescents, developing charts that are still used by many physicians to define normal growth, died of a stroke Aug. 11 in Wellington in southwestern England. He was 90 and had also been suffering from prostate cancer. Virtually unknown to the lay public, Tanner studied 90 children in an orphanage in Harpenden, north of London, from 1948 to 1971, carefully photographing each child and measuring his or her physical stature and other characteristics every three months to create the first modern growth charts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Woe no more for the Galapagos tortoises at the San Diego Zoo. Although they are the oldest creatures at the zoo, the jumbo-sized reptiles have long been overshadowed by the charismatic vertebrates: pandas, koalas, pachyderms, big cats and even bigger polar bears. But now the tortoises — some of whom have been at the zoo since the 1930s — have a new $1-million upgrade to their enclosure on the zoo's Reptile Mesa. The refurbished digs are meant to be more comfy for the animals, more eye-catching for zoo visitors.
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