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Stayhealthy Com

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BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stayhealthy.com, a health-related Web site based in Monrovia, will announce today that it will acquire fledgling Idealab start-up MyLife.com. Idealab, the Pasadena-based Internet incubator that launched EToys and Goto.com, will receive a "significant equity position" as a result of the cash and stock deal, the companies said. The value of the deal was not disclosed. Stayhealthy.com sells devices that allow individuals to track their blood pressure, cholesterol, body fat and other measurements.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stayhealthy.com, a health-related Web site based in Monrovia, will announce today that it will acquire fledgling Idealab start-up MyLife.com. Idealab, the Pasadena-based Internet incubator that launched EToys and Goto.com, will receive a "significant equity position" as a result of the cash and stock deal, the companies said. The value of the deal was not disclosed. Stayhealthy.com sells devices that allow individuals to track their blood pressure, cholesterol, body fat and other measurements.
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NEWS
August 27, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
James F. Sallis concedes there's a nice paradox in trying to get people up and active by using the Internet, which requires them to sit and look. "The reason people are sedentary in the first place is, we have so much technology," said Sallis of San Diego State University. So Sallis, other researchers and some Web entrepreneurs are seeing if the Internet's ability to deliver individually tailored advice and encouragement can provide the coaching needed to turn people on to physical activity.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
James F. Sallis concedes there's a nice paradox in trying to get people up and active by using the Internet, which requires them to sit and look. "The reason people are sedentary in the first place is, we have so much technology," said Sallis of San Diego State University. So Sallis, other researchers and some Web entrepreneurs are seeing if the Internet's ability to deliver individually tailored advice and encouragement can provide the coaching needed to turn people on to physical activity.
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