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OPINION
August 24, 2012
Re "Circumcision's decline could be costly," Aug. 21 How does it make sense to remove a healthy erotogenic organ from a baby boy to avoid the possibility of contracting sexually transmitted diseases in the future? By that reasoning, why not remove one testicle from every boy to avoid future costs of testicular cancer? No wonder the medical establishments throughout Europe and most of the medically advanced world reject this nonsense. Marc E. Angelucci Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: A bad bag ban Letters: Abortion, rape and politics Letters: Promise, peril of scrap yards
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Jon Healey
One key to launching a successful business is finding the right problem to solve. That's why so many entrepreneurs are inspired by problems they encounter themselves or that stymie their family and friends. The trick is not confusing an anecdote for a trend. For example, consider Ramin Bastani, founder and chief executive officer of Los Angeles-based Qpid.me . The company's website is designed to help people deal with one of life's great mysteries: namely, is it safe to have sex with someone I just met in a bar?
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NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Jon Healey
One key to launching a successful business is finding the right problem to solve. That's why so many entrepreneurs are inspired by problems they encounter themselves or that stymie their family and friends. The trick is not confusing an anecdote for a trend. For example, consider Ramin Bastani, founder and chief executive officer of Los Angeles-based Qpid.me . The company's website is designed to help people deal with one of life's great mysteries: namely, is it safe to have sex with someone I just met in a bar?
OPINION
August 24, 2012
Re "Illegal scrap yards heaping up," Aug. 22 Illegal scrap yard operators are actually some of America's true entrepreneurs. They add value to materials that often would be buried in our landfills. Our elected officials must make recycling easier and our citizens must vote to allow the officials the money to do so. About $11 billion worth of our resources was bulldozed into the ground in 2010, according the nonprofit group As You Sow, which promotes environmental and social corporate responsibility.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
The benefits of erectile dysfunction drugs are well- documented. They may be double-edged as well. In a study published Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers analyzed pharmacy data for men over 40 who had received a prescription for an erectile dysfunction drug. We'll let them sum it up: "Men who use ED drugs have higher rates of STDs, particularly HIV infection, both in the year before and after use of these drugs." Here's the abstract from the STD study, the journal's information for patients and the pertinent-facts WebMD story: Men on ED Drugs Get More STDs.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
About 1 in 4 teenage girls in the United States -- and nearly half of black girls -- has at least one sexually transmitted disease, according to a new study. Those numbers translate into an estimated 3.2 million adolescent females infected with one of the four most common STDs -- many of whom may not even know they have a disease or that they are passing it to their sex partners. "What we found is alarming," said Dr. Sara Forhan, a researcher with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and the study's lead author.
OPINION
November 6, 1994
Shari Roan's excellent Column One report (Oct. 26) on the alarming growth of sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents sadly mirrors the findings of Planned Parenthood in working with teens. Last year in our clinics, we saw nearly 15,000 teens, some of whom made the decision to have sex without condoms for such reasons as "I'm on the pill," or "He worked for (a local company), so he must be clean," or "You can't get AIDS from a woman." In the classroom, we urged more than 37,000 teens to act responsibly--either postpone sexuality or heed the dangers of unprotected sex. Should we be surprised that our educational efforts aren't more successful?
NATIONAL
June 4, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Half of all U.S. women who are sexually assaulted are not given recommended treatments to prevent pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases, researchers said. Writing in this month's issue of the Annals of Emergency Medicine, the Johns Hopkins University team said they found 20% of women who went to emergency rooms after being raped were given emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy and 58% were either screened for STDs or given drugs to prevent infection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Syphilis cases in California jumped 18% from 2010 to 2011, according to new data released by the state Department of Public Health. The data also show a 5% rise in chlamydia cases and 1.5% increase in gonorrhea cases. Public health officials said they were concerned about the rise of all three sexually transmitted diseases because they can lead to even more serious health problems, like infertility and an increased risk of HIV. "The longer people have these infections without being treated the more likely it is they are going to develop a complication that will have both health and financial costs," said Heidi Bauer, chief of the Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Branch for the state public health agency.
HEALTH
March 15, 2004 | Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
Teens who make a one-time pledge to remain virgins until marriage catch sexually transmitted diseases about as often as those who don't pledge abstinence, according to a study of the sex lives of 12,000 adolescents. Those who make a public pledge to delay sex also wind up having fewer sex partners and get married earlier, the research shows. But the two groups' STD rates were statistically similar.
OPINION
August 24, 2012
Re "Circumcision's decline could be costly," Aug. 21 How does it make sense to remove a healthy erotogenic organ from a baby boy to avoid the possibility of contracting sexually transmitted diseases in the future? By that reasoning, why not remove one testicle from every boy to avoid future costs of testicular cancer? No wonder the medical establishments throughout Europe and most of the medically advanced world reject this nonsense. Marc E. Angelucci Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: A bad bag ban Letters: Abortion, rape and politics Letters: Promise, peril of scrap yards
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Central Valley teenager Taylor Ghimenti learned in her 9th grade sex education class that HIV-AIDS could be spread by kissing — a medically inaccurate statement. In the 2009 class, her mother said, Taylor was taught only about abstinence as protection against sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancies and given no information about condoms or contraception. That launched a quest by her mother, Mica Ghimenti, to change the Clovis Unified School District's high school sex education curriculum.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Declining rates of circumcision among infants will translate into billions of dollars of unnecessary medical costs in the U.S. as these boys grow up and become sexually active men, researchers at Johns Hopkins University warned. In a study published Monday in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, a team of economists and epidemiologists estimated that every circumcision not performed would lead to significant increases in lifetime medical expenses to treat sexually transmitted diseases and related cancers - increases that far surpass the costs associated with the procedure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Syphilis cases in California jumped 18% from 2010 to 2011, according to new data released by the state Department of Public Health. The data also show a 5% rise in chlamydia cases and 1.5% increase in gonorrhea cases. Public health officials said they were concerned about the rise of all three sexually transmitted diseases because they can lead to even more serious health problems, like infertility and an increased risk of HIV. "The longer people have these infections without being treated the more likely it is they are going to develop a complication that will have both health and financial costs," said Heidi Bauer, chief of the Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Branch for the state public health agency.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some girls may be more likely to overestimate the protection they receive from the HPV vaccine, new research shows. Human papillomaviris, the most common sexually transmitted infection, can infect the genital areas of men and women, cause genital warts and raise the risk of cervical cancer. The new study, published this week by the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, looked at the perception of HPV risk among a population of 339 girls between age 13 and 21. At an average age of 16.8 years, 57.5% of these girls were sexually experienced, and most of them reported "continued need" to practice safe sex. However, a good 23.6% appeared to believe mistakenly that their risk of other sexually transmitted diseases was also lower -- even though the HPV vaccine does not protect against the rest of the pantheon of such diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, gonorrhea and syphilis.
OPINION
December 22, 2011
The way Trent Arsenault touts himself, he's a tall, healthy and educated altruist who helps others by donating his sperm (sans sexual intercourse) on a fairly large scale. The way the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sees it, he operates a sperm bank, albeit an informal and unpaid one, that fails to meet federal regulations. From our perspective, the FDA is overreaching. Arsenault, an electronics company engineer in the Bay Area, promotes his service through the Internet to women who want to get pregnant without paying the $400 to $600 fee that a commercial sperm bank would charge.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | ANDREA HEIMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sex in the '90s is certainly not simple. Not that sex has ever been simple. But combine the fear of AIDS with the epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the changing cultural roles of men and women, and you end up with a confused and weary society of singles. What, exactly, are contemporary attitudes about sex and dating? One study reports that the AIDS epidemic has had a chilling effect on the sex lives of singles.
HEALTH
April 27, 1998
Facts About STDs Sexually transmitted diseases are contracted from having vaginal, oral or anal sex with someone who has an STD. Many people with STDs have no symptoms at all. STDs can still be passed even if there are no apparent symptoms. If not treated, STDs can cause serious health problems, even death. Some STDs can cause sterility. In pregnant women, STDs can harm or even kill the fetus. Most STDs can be cured. But some remain in the body indefinitely and have symptoms that may recur.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
OK, Halloween checklist: No eye color-changing lenses, because they can infect your cornea. Check. No black licorice for days at a time, as it lowers potassium and can cause heart arrythmias. Check. Don't go overboard on the chocolate, which contains caffeine; do brush your teeth after eating gummy candy; and plan an extra half-hour on the elliptical for the rest of this week. Check, check and check. Oh, and no unprotected sex with vampires: they might tell you you can't get pregnant, but just ask Bella: You can. He might tell you he doesn't have any sexually transmitted diseases, but can you imagine how many partners a 700-year old guy might have racked up (especially if he looks like Robert Pattinson or Stephen Moyer)
NEWS
January 3, 2011 | Tami Dennis / Tribune Health
Sexually transmitted diseases -- so easy to get, so difficult to remember how or when. That's not quite the conclusion of a new study published Monday in Pediatrics, but suffice to say: Don't take a young adult's claim of abstinence as proof he or she is disease-free. (The same may well hold true for older adults, but this study was limited to the young variety.) Researchers at  Emory University analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and tested 14,012 of the respondents (with their permission)
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