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April 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Two leaders of ethnic Indian groups opposed to Nicaragua's Sandinista regime will return to Managua from Honduras to take part in elections scheduled for February, 1990, a spokesman for the group said Saturday. Steadman Fagoth and Brooklyn Rivera head the Yatama Indian group, made up of Miskitos, Sumos and Ramas who fought the Sandinista government along Nicaragua's Caribbean coast. The spokesman, Kendy Medina, said by telephone the two will return to Managua in August.
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NEWS
April 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Two leaders of ethnic Indian groups opposed to Nicaragua's Sandinista regime will return to Managua from Honduras to take part in elections scheduled for February, 1990, a spokesman for the group said Saturday. Steadman Fagoth and Brooklyn Rivera head the Yatama Indian group, made up of Miskitos, Sumos and Ramas who fought the Sandinista government along Nicaragua's Caribbean coast. The spokesman, Kendy Medina, said by telephone the two will return to Managua in August.
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NEWS
January 6, 1985
Honduran police have arrested an Indian leader of U.S.-backed rebels opposed to the leftist government of neighboring Nicaragua and may deport him soon, Honduran officials said. Steadman Fagoth Muller, who commands an Indian rebel group known as the Misura, violated the law by "getting involved in politics," the officials said. Foreign Minister Edgardo Paz Barnica said Nicaraguan rebels should be "booted out" of his country.
NEWS
January 7, 1985
Honduras said it will deport Steadman Fagoth Muller, a leader of Nicaraguan Indian rebels, and send him to Miami sometime this week, a government spokesman said. The spokesman, demanding anonymity, also threatened to "deport all leaders of armed clandestine organizations that are harassing Nicaragua or any other Central American nation from our territory . . . " He included those from the Misura Indian coalition and the Nicaraguan Democratic Force, the major U.S.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | From Reuters
The Sandinista government Tuesday reached a preliminary cease-fire agreement with a rebel force fighting for the independence of the country's eastern Atlantic coast. A statement released after peace talks here between the government and members of a Nicaraguan resistance group called Yatama said both sides agreed to "desist from military actions" while negotiations continue. Yatama is composed of Indian tribes and Creoles.
NEWS
March 7, 1985 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Two Nicaraguan anti-Communist rebels made their debut at Los Angeles' first fund-raiser for their cause at the Beverly Wilshire on Wednesday night, drawing about 100 supporters inside and more than 1,500 demonstrators outside the hotel on Wilshire Boulevard.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Indian rebel leaders said Wednesday they will send a 10-member delegation to Managua soon to begin cease-fire negotiations with the Sandinista government under a Central American peace plan. Miskito Indian leader Brooklyn Rivera said in a telephone interview from Costa Rica that he expects the talks to begin within the next week and to include Interior Minister Tomas Borge, who directs government policy toward the Indians.
NEWS
January 5, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Foreign Minister Edgardo Paz Barnica has called for the expulsion of Nicaraguan Indian rebels who have been using Honduran territory as a base for launching attacks against Nicaragua's Sandinista government. He made the expulsion threat after reports circulated of a Thursday news conference held in the Honduran capital by Steadman Fagoth, leader of a coalition of eastern Nicaraguan Indian tribes called Misura--the Miskito, Sumo and Rama.
NEWS
June 15, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The Sandinista government has signed a cease-fire agreement with two Miskito Indian leaders that is expected to lead to the return of hundreds of displaced Indians to their homes in northeastern Nicaragua, Miskito spokesmen and sources close to the negotiations said Friday. The accord is a step toward resolving a nagging political and military problem for the government with Nicaragua's Indian tribes. It also reflects disarray among Indian leaders who have been allied with U.S.
NEWS
January 23, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Brooklyn Rivera, a leader of Nicaragua's Indian rebels, is scheduled to head a 10-member delegation to Managua today for peace talks with the Sandinista government. Rivera said the delegates expect to negotiate with members of the nine-member Sandinista National Directorate during their weeklong stay. They also plan, he said, to visit the isolated Atlantic coast region, where the Indians have been fighting since 1981.
NEWS
February 4, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Rightist Nicaraguan rebels, hoping to attract more international support and get new U.S. financing for their war against Managua's Sandinista government, are renewing efforts to forge a broad political front with other anti-Communist leaders. Unity, however, remains elusive. On Sunday, a gathering in Miami billed as a meeting to forge a common front attracted only two rebel leaders.
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