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Stealth

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SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
Yes, it's negative news almost everywhere with the NHL's lockout, a deepening malaise during this holiday season: Preemptive legal strikes by the league, possible dissolution of the players association, and an eye-opening read in Tuesday's Globe and Mail by Roy MacGregor, detailing the "quite alarming" damage done to the league's brand. An executive from a branding company told MacGregor that the results were the worst it had seen since polling done regarding BP during the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A month from now, if all goes according to plan in Oklahoma, two convicted murderers will be executed by lethal injection, and without knowing exactly how the killing cocktail was put together or by whom. Without that knowledge, they could well be denied their basic constitutional protection against cruel and unusual punishment. The death penalty, as we've written before, is an indefensible mess of immorality, gamed judicial processes, misapplication based on race and class, and public expense.
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IMAGE
May 2, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Even as consumers slowly climb out of the economic morass of the last few years, the men's luxury watch business — in which a single timepiece can easily sell for five figures or more — is still responding to the turmoil, emphasizing a kind of stealth luxury, a return to classic styles and the notion of brand heritage. Luxury fashion cycles through trends at lightning pace every six months. But the complicated, technical nature of timepieces — which can have as many as 700 moving parts — means changes in the watch market move at a comparatively glacial pace, taking from 11/2 to almost eight years.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien and Walter Hamilton
SAN FRANCISCO - In fewer than 140 characters, or 24 words, Twitter Inc. disclosed that it was planning the highest-profile public stock offering since Facebook Inc. But that was about all it did, leaving stunned investors and analysts scrambling for nearly two weeks to find out more. Sometime this week or next, they may finally get the details as the micro-blogging service is widely expected to make public its secret filing. Twitter's "stealth IPO" has thrown the spotlight on a controversial law passed almost two years ago that rewrote the rule book for start-ups seeking to go public.
NEWS
February 3, 1986 | United Press International
U.S. satellites have spotted in the Soviet Union what some analysts believe is a prototype of a "stealth" type of fighter plane that could elude detection on radar, according to a report to be published today in an industry newsletter. "Sharp-resolution U.S. electronic reconnaissance satellites have discovered . . . an aircraft on the ground that some intelligence analysts believe is a prototype-design 'stealth' fighter," International TechTrends said.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop's sole-source contract on the Stealth bomber will come under attack today when Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Service Committee, will tell the House that he will offer an amendment to require competition in the multibillion-dollar aircraft program.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1987
As reported by The Times last month, an investigation requested by the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on oversight and investigations determined that Northrop's Pico Rivera plant has been unable to locate a large number of documents, but the company already has tightened its security system. A General Accounting Office investigation, requested by the subcommittee, found that out of more than 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1989
So, the B-2 stealth bomber is, in the words of Air Force Secretary Donald B. Rice, "the most efficient option available" to threaten well-defended Soviet targets. ("Capitol Hill Has 'Sticker Shock' Over B-2," Part I, July 13). Which war are we fighting here? This is all old talk. No nation today can afford major war, let alone the nuclear winter a nuclear war would bring. This is just pork-barrel politics the way Americans have always liked it. The entire Western world is in debt up to its eyeballs.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
An unclassified Pentagon document has disclosed the existence of a multibillion-dollar aircraft program called Aurora, but Defense Department officials Friday rebuffed questions about it because they said it is officially classified. The unusual incident fueled speculation that Aurora is one of the Pentagon's secret stealth programs, either the Northrop Corp. stealth bomber or the Lockheed Corp. stealth fighter.
OPINION
October 6, 2006
Re "A Countdown to 300 Million," Oct. 4 Will this happen by stork or stealth? ED SCHLOSSMAN Thousand Oaks
WORLD
March 28, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Two American stealth bombers flew over South Korea in a practice run to drop dummy munitions, the U.S. military announced Thursday. The unusual announcement is expected to further anger North Korea, which issued threats this month over recently completed U.S.-South Korean military exercises. American forces said the B-2 Spirit bombers were sent Thursday to South Korea from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. Their mission “involved flying more than 6,500 miles to the Korean peninsula, dropping inert munitions on the Jik Do Range, and returning to the continental U.S. in a single, continuous mission,” the U.S. Forces Korea said in its statement.
WORLD
March 27, 2013 | Barbara Demick
When a two-engine Chinese turboprop darted over disputed islands in the East China Sea, the first foreign intrusion into Japanese airspace in more than 50 years, the People's Liberation Army was able to truthfully profess its innocence. The tiny turboprop belonged to China Marine Surveillance, a once-obscure cog in the vast bureaucracy that has become a kind of paramilitary force in Asian waters. A host of Chinese agencies with innocuous titles -- the Maritime Safety Administration, the Fisheries Law Enforcement Command, the State Oceanic Administration -- have become stealth warriors in Beijing's campaign to press its territorial claims in Asian waters.
WORLD
January 11, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Chavismo is alive and well in Venezuela, which is more than can be said with confidence about the man who inspired it. President Hugo Chavez remains so ill and incommunicado a month after undergoing cancer surgery in Cuba that he missed his inauguration Thursday, setting off new political disputes over whether he is still the legitimate head of state. Supporters of the once-larger-than-life former paratrooper nevertheless poured into the streets of Caracas to dance and declare their loyalty -- a demonstration, Latin America analysts say, of the enduring legacy of a president whose social welfare programs halved the poverty level and dramatically narrowed the gap between rich and poor.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
Yes, it's negative news almost everywhere with the NHL's lockout, a deepening malaise during this holiday season: Preemptive legal strikes by the league, possible dissolution of the players association, and an eye-opening read in Tuesday's Globe and Mail by Roy MacGregor, detailing the "quite alarming" damage done to the league's brand. An executive from a branding company told MacGregor that the results were the worst it had seen since polling done regarding BP during the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
The Social Security Administration is getting better all the time -- at quietly slashing services to Americans. The agency has closed dozens of field offices and sharply cut back the staff and hours of those still open. The cutbacks threaten to make wait times on its phone lines longer. Rulings on disability applications will take longer too. Put it all together, and client service at the Social Security Administration begins to look more like customer service at your cable company every day. That's bad for the agency, and it's worse for the millions of Americans who pay into the program with every paycheck or depend on its life-sustaining benefits.
SPORTS
January 26, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
Moisture, condensation, fog -- whatever you want to call it -- has made it impossible to peek through two windows on the door of the St. John Bosco wrestling room to see what's happening inside. Then the door opens, and a visitor is blasted with a burst of hot air as if a heater is going full throttle.  It's sauna-like conditions, and yet there's no machine producing the heat. It's coming from more than 20 shirtless, sweating wrestlers circling the room and trying to prove what Coach Omar Delgado means when he says, "Wrestling is a six-minute sprint.
NEWS
October 25, 1987
The Air Force jet that crashed into an airport hotel in Indianapolis, killing nine workers, was part of a unit that has been linked to the secret stealth bomber program, according to a published report. There is some suspicion that the A-7D Corsair II attack jets attached to the unit have been used to test electronic equipment for the stealth program, a source who was not identified told the Indianapolis Star.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990
According to a front-page story in The Times (April 4), the Pentagon could ultimately slip in an extra $6.6 billion on its tax bill to the public by means of Stealth. REX D. FRAZIER Covina
SPORTS
December 31, 2011 | Gary Klein
A photograph of LaMichael James went viral this week, the shot of the Oregon star cowering on a Disneyland thrill ride literally zooming across social media platforms. Reaction to the photo -- and his terror-filled expression -- surprised and amused James. "I guess I'm on a lot of people's minds," he said. It didn't seem that way during the latter half of the college football season. The 2010 Heisman Trophy finalist mostly fell out of discussion for this season's award despite leading the nation in rushing yards per game.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The radar-evading drone that crash-landed over the weekend in Iran was on a mission for the CIA, according to a senior U.S. official, raising fears that the aircraft's sophisticated technology could be exploited by Tehran or shared with other American rivals. It was unclear whether the drone's mission took it over Iran or whether it strayed there accidentally because of technical malfunctions, the official said. Though the drone flight was a CIA operation, U.S. military personnel were involved in flying the aircraft, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the secrecy involved.
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