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Stealth Bomber

NEWS
August 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
The military's bomber force gets a significant lift from the $263.8-billion compromise defense bill approved Thursday by House and Senate negotiators. Details of the plan show lawmakers anxious to protect the fleet from cuts and to keep alive the possibility of building more B-2 Stealth bombers. The legislation requires final votes in the House and Senate and President Clinton's signature before becoming law. Lawmakers said they hoped Congress could send the measure to Clinton next week.
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NEWS
November 23, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Corp. pulled open its doors and towed the B-2 stealth bomber out of a top-secret hangar at a formal ceremony in Palmdale on Tuesday, finally taking the wraps off an eerie-looking aircraft intended to fly undetected by radar. The bomber, flanked by attack dogs, drew wild cheers from about 2,000 Air Force officers, industry executives and factory workers who attended the invitation-only event.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Northrop Corp. cannot find 780 classified documents from its stealth bomber program, according to a draft congressional report made public today. The report said some of the documents may have been destroyed without required "destruction certificates" being prepared. Out of more than 2.7 million classified documents kept at Northrop's plant in Pico Rivera, Calif.
NEWS
February 25, 1986 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
As part of a continuing federal investigation of Southern California's defense industry, a former Northrop Corp. engineer and the chief executive of a Glendale company were accused Monday of fraud in unrelated cases involving subcontracting work on the Air Force's top-secret stealth bomber. The fraud complaints were filed by the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles against William Reinke, 56, a former engineer with Northrop's Advanced Systems Division in Pico Rivera, and Charles F.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
The B-2 stealth bomber moved under its own power for the first time today, emerging from its super-secret research hangar and rolling out onto a desert runway. The sleek, bat-like bomber, the most advanced in the Pentagon's arsenal and capable of penetrating enemy radar defenses without being detected, taxied onto the runway shortly after sunrise and began a series of engine tests at various power settings. As the tests began, the engines changed in pitch from an eerie whistle to a low roar.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The B-2 stealth bomber underwent two high-speed taxi tests for the first time Thursday afternoon, the last milestone before the aircraft attempts to make its first flight, the Air Force said. The bomber accelerated to about 132 miles per hour and lifted its nose gear off the runway at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, where it was assembled by Northrop. A previous taxi test Thursday was done at a slower speed and the nose gear did not lift off, Air Force officials said.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | From United Press International
The controversial B-2 Stealth bomber was forced to cut short its fourth and fifth test flights because of low oil pressure and high winds, the Pentagon announced Tuesday. "The plane will not be flown again for at least five weeks while planned modifications are done to the plane and while there are some ground vibration tests done to the B-2," Defense Department spokesman Pete Williams said.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Air Force Wednesday lifted some of the secrecy surrounding its exotic new stealth bomber, releasing a rough artist's rendering revealing the plane to be a modern version of a "flying wing" design tried out and abandoned in the early 1950s. With the picture came the announcement that the controversial plane will make its first flight next fall--a short hop from its assembly facility at Palmdale to the Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop will begin hiring and transferring employees in early 1986 to a new Palmdale factory that is believed to be the future production site of the Stealth bomber, marking a significant step forward in the secret aircraft program. Northrop spokesman Tony Cantafio said Monday that the Los Angeles-based firm expects to have 400 to 600 employees at the Palmdale plant by mid-1986 and 1,000 to 1,500 employees by mid-1987.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | Times Wire Services
The revolutionary Stealth bomber, a "flying wing" built to strike deep into the Soviet Union while avoiding radar detection, will be unveiled for the first time in November in California, the Pentagon said today. The Defense Department also announced the dimensions of the super-secret nuclear bomber, officially designated the B-2, and said it will carry a crew of only two--a pilot and an electronics officer.
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