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Stealth Bombers

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NEWS
April 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Six B-2 stealth bombers now are available for nuclear as well as conventional attack missions, including dropping earth-penetrating nuclear weapons that can burrow several hundred feet underground. The B-2s formally become part of the Pentagon's "nuclear war plan" today, said a senior military officer who spoke on condition of anonymity. That means the aircraft, its crew, weapons and support systems have all passed numerous tests and are available for potential duty.
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WORLD
March 28, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Two American stealth bombers flew over South Korea in a practice run to drop dummy munitions, the U.S. military announced Thursday. The unusual announcement is expected to further anger North Korea, which issued threats this month over recently completed U.S.-South Korean military exercises. American forces said the B-2 Spirit bombers were sent Thursday to South Korea from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. Their mission “involved flying more than 6,500 miles to the Korean peninsula, dropping inert munitions on the Jik Do Range, and returning to the continental U.S. in a single, continuous mission,” the U.S. Forces Korea said in its statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1992
The invincibility of the B-2 Stealth bomber was unquestionably verified when one considers how Senate approval of President Bush's request for 20 of these $2.2-billion-per-aircraft bargains didn't cause even the slightest blip on the nation's political radar screen. The openness of this Stealth deal underlines the state of our national economic insanity. It stuns one to contemplate what would be done with the money, if just one less B-2 were bought: -- Retraining of laid-off defense workers; loans to help start new small businesses; development grants to advance technology--job and wealth creation!
BUSINESS
May 22, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Deep in the Mojave Desert, surrounded by tiers of barbed-wire fence, the nation's largest defense contractors work in secrecy designing and building the latest military aircraft at Air Force Plant 42. The military's top weapons buyer quietly visited the Palmdale facility this month to talk with leading aerospace executives about plans to build a fleet of radar-evading bombers that the military hopes to have ready for action by the mid-2020s....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997
Robert Scheer's hope ("Let's Hope It Rains on the B-2's Parade," Column Left, Aug. 26) that the Congress doesn't stick us with nine more B-2 Stealth bombers is certainly justified. Whether you accept his figure of $27 billion for the nine planes or the Defense Department's figure of $14 billion to $20 billion, the cost per unit is mind-boggling. That the bombers degrade in many temperature conditions, that they've never proved they're completely stealthy, that they have no mission, that the Pentagon doesn't want them, only makes clear the fact that they're purest pork and nothing but. What's actually stealthy is their removal of public funds from programs that would truly benefit the taxpayer.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
The military's bomber force gets a significant lift from the $263.8-billion compromise defense bill approved Thursday by House and Senate negotiators. Details of the plan show lawmakers anxious to protect the fleet from cuts and to keep alive the possibility of building more B-2 Stealth bombers. The legislation requires final votes in the House and Senate and President Clinton's signature before becoming law. Lawmakers said they hoped Congress could send the measure to Clinton next week.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | From Reuters
Bowing to budget constraints and a diminished Soviet threat, the Bush Administration is backing away from its goal of buying 75 B-2 Stealth bombers, a newspaper reported today. Quoting unidentified Pentagon and congressional sources, the New York Times said the Administration's new aim, the purchase of perhaps 35 Stealth planes, may be in jeopardy.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | SARA FRITZ and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
Super-secret Stealth bombers are going to cost nearly $600 million each--more than twice the cost of the B-1 bomber and substantially higher than Pentagon estimates, Rep. Mike Synar (D-Okla.) predicted Wednesday. Synar is the first member of Congress to publicly discuss the costs of Stealth, which are held as classified information by the Pentagon.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending a long struggle over Northrop Corp.'s B-2 bomber, the Senate on Friday approved President Bush's request for a fleet of 20 of the Stealth aircraft. Because more planes were not approved, Northrop will phase out B-2 production by around 1997, and the company will eliminate thousands of jobs in Southern California as the program winds down. Opponents of the bomber had been fighting to keep the number of the $2.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | Associated Press
Five of the Air Force's B-2 "stealth" bombers have been cleared to resume test flights after being inspected for cracks in a tailpipe clamp, officials said Tuesday. Five other B-2s are having some of their clamps replaced and are not yet cleared to fly, said Senior Airman Scott Ficinus, a spokesman at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo.
SPORTS
March 31, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Kansas City, Mo. If you listen to Angels catcher Bobby Wilson , there are few experiences in baseball that can match putting on a big league uniform on opening day. "This is the best," he said. "The big American flag in center field. The flyover. The goose bumps when that plane goes over. The first pitch of the season. It's awesome. There's nothing like it. " Thursday's festivities in Kansas City featured a flyover by a B-2 bomber. And for outfielder Peter Bourjos , who had a pair of hits and scored a run, that was the most memorable part of his first major leaguer opener.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Hunched over, her eyes fixed downward, Tanya Hart inches across the vast wing of the B-2 stealth bomber one small step at a time, looking for any nicks or hairline scratches in the freshly repainted surface. Even a tiny blemish could make the B-2 as visible on radar screens as a giant flying tin can. Hart, 50, is the last line of defense for what may be the world's most expensive paint job. "This isn't a job where you can afford to mess up," said Hart, a "surface technician" for Northrop Grumman Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2008 | Dan Weikel
A B-2 stealth bomber from the 509th Bomber Wing performed a ceremonial flyover Sunday during services for Verne Orr, a former secretary of the U.S. Air Force who died last week at age 92. Lt. Col. Todd Copeland said the B-2 Spirit bomber from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri flew over the First United Methodist Church on East Colorado Boulevard. Orr was Air Force secretary from 1981 to 85 under Reagan. He restarted the B-1 bomber program and oversaw the inception of the B-2 program.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Air Force was investigating the first crash of a costly B-2 stealth bomber after one plunged to the ground Saturday shortly after beginning the last flight of a four-month deployment. Both pilots ejected safely, though one was being transferred to Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu to be treated for spinal compression, said Tech. Sgt. Tom Czerwinski of the Pacific Air Force's public affairs office in Hawaii.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2004 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
The B-2 stealth bomber, with its boomerang shape and rubber-like skin, is a marvel of high-tech engineering, capable of sneaking undetected across hostile territories. And the special coating that makes the $2.1-billion aircraft nearly invisible to radar is a big maintenance headache: It takes technicians days to gingerly reapply the coating each time a body panel is removed to allow access to the jet's innards.
OPINION
January 5, 2003
Re "114th Tournament of Roses," Jan. 2: By what convoluted path of reasoning did the Rose Parade committee arrive at the decision to include stealth bombers--machines designed to carry weapons of mass destruction, which are the source of death, mutilation and terror to many children of the world--in an event supposedly celebrating "Children's Dreams, Wishes and Imagination"? Joyce Parkhurst Long Beach
OPINION
January 5, 2003
Re "114th Tournament of Roses," Jan. 2: By what convoluted path of reasoning did the Rose Parade committee arrive at the decision to include stealth bombers--machines designed to carry weapons of mass destruction, which are the source of death, mutilation and terror to many children of the world--in an event supposedly celebrating "Children's Dreams, Wishes and Imagination"? Joyce Parkhurst Long Beach
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER
Tailed by controversy through much of its existence, the B-2 stealth bomber is flying into a new political cross-fire in California. With the state's presidential primary fast approaching, the campaign of Texas Gov. George W. Bush is dropping tantalizing hints that if he is elected, he may order more of the $2.2-billion-a-copy, radar-evading bombers, the most expensive warplane ever built. Reopening Northrop Grumman Corp.'
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a clear sign of a warming trend in U.S.-China relations, Washington and Beijing have agreed to resume military-to-military contacts at the highest level. In response to an invitation from China, the Clinton administration will send Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and the commander in chief of the U.S. Pacific Command, Adm. Dennis Cutler Blair, to Beijing in coming months. The invitation was extended during 14 hours of talks in Washington this week between top Pentagon policymakers and Lt.
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